No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Also teacher grades, school choices, and other findings from the 2014 EdNext poll. Full results also available at education next.org/edfacts

Inside Successful District-Charter Compacts

Teachers and administrators collaborate to share best practices

Beyond the Factory Model

Oakland teachers learn how to blend

Civil Rights Enforcement Gone Haywire

The federal government’s new school-discipline policy

More from Ednext

Expand Your Reach

New-world role combines coaching teachers and teaching students

Reporting Opinion, Shaping an Agenda

A review of ‘Teachers Versus the Public,’ by Paul E. Peterson, Michael Henderson and Martin R. West

Catholic School Closures and the Decline of Urban Neighborhoods

A review of ‘Lost Classroom, Lost Community’ by Margaret F. Brinig and Nicole Stelle Garnett

Learning in the Digital Age

Better educational apps are coming

Charters Should Be Expected to Serve All Kinds of Students

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?



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From Our Blog

California: A Case Study for Charter School Success

The California Charter Schools Association just released our 4th annual Portrait of the Movement report which covers what has happened in California’s charter school movement over the past five years, why it happened, and what can be done to ensure continued growth and momentum.

Holding a Wolf by the Ears

Secretary Duncan’s reflective take on testing can delay, but cannot resolve, the reckoning that seems to be at hand.

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On Top of the News

How Social Media Silences Debate

8/26/14 | The Upshot (New York Times)

Behind the Headline

from the EdNext Archives

in the news

Tweet Thine Enemy

Education Next

A new Pew report finds that using social media makes people less likely to express views that differ from those of their friends. An Ed Next article looks at how this polarization is playing out in the education policy world.

Students Aren't Getting Enough Sleep--School Starts Too Early

8/25/14 | The Atlantic

Behind the Headline

from the EdNext Archives

in the news

Do Schools Begin Too Early?

Education Next

The American Academy of Pediatrics issued a statement in support of later school start times to promote adolescent health and safety. In a study published by Education Next, Finley Edwards found that later start times boost student achievement.

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Videos
What We’re Watching: The Vergara Fight Goes Coast to Coast

Mike Petrilli and Mike McShane discuss the spread of legal challenges to state laws governing teacher tenure, dismissal, and seniority.

Podcast
What We’re Listening To: A Tale of Two Polls

A story on NPR’s Morning Edition looks into why two new surveys come to different conclusions about the extent of support for the Common Core.

Press Releases and Announcements
Effective Schools Help Students Outperform Expectations Based on Cognitive Skills

Differences in school effectiveness have important consequences for students’ academic achievement.


Support for Common Core Slips, But Majority of Public Still In Favor

2014 EdNext poll finds while the public, on average, gives 50% of teachers in their local schools an A or a B grade, 22% are given a D or an F


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