• How Can Schools Address America’s Marriage Crisis?

    Prepare young people for rewarding careers

    By  
  • Purposeful Parenthood

    Better planning benefits new parents and their children

    By  
  • How Many Charter Schools is Just Right?

    Education Next talks with Scott Pearson, John H. “Skip” McKoy, and Neerav Kingsland

    By  , and
  • One-Parent Students Leave School Earlier

    Education attainment gap widens

    By  , and
  • New Hampshire’s Journey Toward Competency-Based Education

    State lifts barriers to innovation, allowing districts and charters to personalize learning

    By  
  • Government Should Subsidize, Not Tax, Marriage

    Social policies have influenced the rate of growth in single-parent families

    By  
Purposeful Parenthood

Better planning benefits new parents and their children

How Many Charter Schools is Just Right?

Education Next talks with Scott Pearson, John H. “Skip” McKoy, and Neerav Kingsland

New Hampshire’s Journey Toward Competency-Based Education

State lifts barriers to innovation, allowing districts and charters to personalize learning

Government Should Subsidize, Not Tax, Marriage

Social policies have influenced the rate of growth in single-parent families

Match Corps Goes National

Successful high-dosage tutoring model spreads to other schools

More from Ednext

The New Orleans Case for All-Charter School Districts

Across the country, children in urban districts are being denied rich, rigorous educational opportunities.

D.C. Students Benefit from Mix of Charter and Traditional Schools

Charter schools are revolutionizing public schooling in Washington, D.C. In just 18 years, charter schools have grown from an initial 5 to 112 schools today, managed by 61 nonprofit organizations. This

Single-Parent Families: Revisiting the Moynihan Report 50 Years Later

An event will take place on March 5 in Washington, D.C.

More Harm Than Good

A review of “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed,” by Jason L. Riley

A Tribute to Martha Derthick

With Martha Derthick’s passing on January 12, 2015, America lost one of its preeminent scholars of American politics.



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From Our Blog

Memo to Teachers’ Unions: Now Might Be a Good Time to Start Panicking

In Friedrichs, ten California teachers are arguing that agency fees (combined with onerous “opt-out” procedures) violate their rights to freedom of speech and association

No Child Left Behind and Testing Help Hold Schools Accountable

Annual, statewide testing should be saved, and it can be if moderates in both parties fight off special interests.

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On Top of the News

Poll: Widespread Misperceptions About the Common Core Standards

Washington Post | 2/21/15

Behind the Headline

from the EdNext Archives

in the news

No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Education Next

A new poll finds a great deal of confusion about the Common Core State Standards, even among people who say they are paying close attention. The 2014 Ed Next poll found varying levels of support for the Common Core among different groups.

America's Skills Challenge: Millennials and the Future

ETS| 2/17/15

Behind the Headline

from the EdNext Archives

in the news

Education and Economic Growth

Education Next

While millennials in the U.S. have attended more years of school than previous generations, their skills are lower than those of previous generations and of their peers in other nations. A study published in Ed Next looks at the impact of those lower skills on economic growth.

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Videos
What We’re Watching: Empowering Parents and Voters for K-12 Education Reform

On Thursday, Feb. 26, Andrew Kelly and Jon Valant discussed new research on parent empowerment.

Podcast
What We’re Listening To: Rethinking Standardized Testing

Diane Rehm hosted a discussion of the role of standardized testing on her NPR show last week.

Press Releases and Announcements
Education Gap Grows for Adolescents from Single-Parent Families

Young people raised in one-parent homes complete fewer years of schooling and are less likely to receive a B. A. degree


U.S. Students from Two-Parent Families Achieve a Grade Level Higher than Peers from Single-Parent Families

The United States has one of the highest percentages of single-parent families among developed countries


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