Author

Brian Kisida

    Author Bio:
    Brian Kisida is a Senior Research Associate in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas. He has extensive experience evaluating education systems and has co-authored multiple experimental impact evaluations through the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S. Department of Education. Additionally, his research has examined the educational benefits of cultural institutions, art and music education, school integration, and the effectiveness of curriculum standards. His academic publications include articles in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Educational Researcher, Education and Urban Society, Policy Studies Journal, American Politics Research, and State Politics and Policy Quarterly. His work has been cited in congressional testimony before the U.S. House and Senate, and it has appeared in numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and CNN.


Articles

The Educational Value of Field Trips

Taking students to an art museum improves critical thinking skills, and more

WINTER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Supplemental Study: Long-Term Benefits of Field Trips to the Walton Arts Center

Supplemental Study and Methodological Appendix

A Closer Look at Charter Schools and Segregation

Flawed comparisons lead to overstated conclusions

Summer 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 3

Blog Posts/Multimedia

The Many Ways Teacher Diversity May Benefit Students

At least three distinct theories have been proposed about how moving away from a majority-white teacher workforce would be beneficial for students of color.

08/22/2016

Education without Representation

As the diversity of students in our schools continues to grow, the arguments for policies meant to improve representation among teachers have more and more evidence to support them.

03/16/2015

Views from Private Schools

Policymakers seeking to improve the quantity and quality of educational options for families through private school choice programs should consider the opinions of the school leaders poised to serve those customers.

01/21/2015

Our Reply to the Civil Rights Project’s Response

We are pleased that the authors of the Civil Rights Project (CRP) report on racial segregation in charter schools have chosen to respond to our reanalysis of the 2007-08 data. This dialogue is important as we attempt to move toward the most appropriate analytic strategies for this question. However, we take issue with three points made (or not made) in the CRP response.

05/13/2010

Torturing the Charter Schools Until They Confess

Earlier this year the UCLA-based Civil Rights Project (CRP), jumped on the anti-charter bandwagon when it released “Choice without Equity: Charter School Segregation and the Need for Civil Rights Standards.” This was, in my view, just the latest salvo in a continuing barrage of assaults against charter schools by critics of choice. Sadly, this report received lots of uncritical publicity in major media outlets, despite obviously flawed analyses.

04/27/2010
Fatal error: Maximum execution time of 30 seconds exceeded in /var/www/html/wp-includes/formatting.php on line 3082