Author

Matthew M. Chingos

    Author Website: http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/experts/chingosm


    Author Bio:
    Matthew M. Chingos is a fellow in the Brookings Institution’s Brown Center on Education Policy. He has written extensively on class-size reduction, teacher quality, and college graduation rates. Chingos’s first book, Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America’s Public Universities, coauthored with William G. Bowen and Michael S. McPherson, was published by Princeton University Press in 2009. Chingos received a B.A. in Government and Economics and a Ph.D. in Government, both from Harvard University.


Articles

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

The Impact of School Vouchers on College Enrollment

African Americans benefited the most

SUMMER 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 3

Online Learning in Higher Education

Study finds that students enrolled in a large “hybrid” course learned as much as students in a traditional course, at substantial cost savings

Spring 2013 / Vol. 13, No. 2

Questioning the Quality of Virtual Schools

NEPC report uses flawed measures

SPRING 2013 / VOL. 13, NO. 2

Grading Schools

Can citizens tell a good school when they see one?

Fall 2010 / Vol. 10, No. 4

For-Profit and Nonprofit Management in Philadelphia Schools

What kind of management does better than the district-run schools?

Spring 2009 / Vol. 9, No. 2

Blog Posts/Multimedia

Ending Teacher Tenure Would Have Little Impact on its Own

Data from North Carolina suggest that principals are not using the four-year period before teachers qualify for tenure to identify and remove their lowest performers.

09/29/2014

Classroom Observations Offer Biggest Room for Improvement in Teacher Evaluations

Addressing the design flaws we have identified in teacher evaluation systems will bring districts closer to achieving the primary goal of meaningful teacher evaluation: assuring greater equity in students’ access to good teachers.

09/17/2014

Who Profits from the Master’s Degree Pay Bump for Teachers?

The fact that teachers with master’s degrees are no more effective in the classroom, on average, than their colleagues without advanced degrees is one of the most consistent findings in education research.

06/06/2014

Do Public Pensions Provide Equal Pay for Equal Work?

Women are more likely to spend time out of the workforce than men, and defined-benefit pension plans tend to punish teachers who fail to meet specific targets, such as 30 years of service.

03/13/2014

Big Data Wins the War on Christmas

A social scientist analyzes whether Christmas affects test scores

12/19/2013

Ending Summer Vacation is Long Overdue—Here’s How to Pay for It

There’s clearly a slam-dunk case for eliminating—or at least dramatically shortening—summer vacation, which fits into a broader push to lengthen the school year beyond the 180 days that is typical in the U.S.

08/08/2013

The Need for Good Research on Pension Reform

Rhode Island is among the few states that have enacted sweeping pension reforms. Accurate information about the effects of those changes is vital both locally and to other states deciding which changes to make to their own retirement systems.

07/11/2013

Does Expanding School Choice Increase Segregation?

The findings reported here indicate that it is unlikely that charter schools—a prominent effort to increase school choice, especially for students from disadvantaged backgrounds—are making the problem worse.

05/16/2013

U.S. Institute of Education Sciences Weighs In on Voucher Impacts on College Enrollment

The What Works Clearinghouse declared the voucher study to be “a well-implemented randomized controlled trial.”

05/14/2013

Accepting Class Size Increases in Order to Sustain Wiser Investments

Are smaller classes worth the cost, relative to the alternative of a salary increase?

01/30/2013

Critique of Study of Voucher Impact on College Enrollment Misguided

Several of the issues raised by Goldrick-Rab have no merit and none undermine the primary conclusion of our study.

09/13/2012

Choosing Blindly

How can we tolerate ignorance on something that is as critical to student learning as instructional materials?

05/17/2012

Reviewing the Evidence on Class Size

There is little doubt that reducing class size can boost student achievement in some circumstances. What is much less certain is how much of a difference class-size policies can make, and whether the impacts are large enough to justify the costs of hiring additional teachers and building new classrooms.

06/22/2011
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