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Substantial Opportunities for Improving Teacher Evaluations Lie in the Area of Classroom Observations

Researchers recommend adjusting classroom observation scores for student demographics, using observations conducted by trained external observers

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

The Force Behind Sisulu-Walker

A review of Mary C. Bounds’ “A Light Shines in Harlem: New York’s First Charter School and the Movement It Led”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Effective Schools Help Students Outperform Expectations Based on Cognitive Skills

Differences in school effectiveness have important consequences for students’ academic achievement.

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

What Effective Schools Do

Stretching the cognitive limits on achievement

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Support for Common Core Slips, But Majority of Public Still In Favor

2014 EdNext poll finds while the public, on average, gives 50% of teachers in their local schools an A or a B grade, 22% are given a D or an F

No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Also teacher grades, school choices, and other findings from the 2014 EdNext poll. Full results also available at education next.org/edfacts

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

The Philadelphia School District’s Ongoing Financial Crisis

Why the district has a money problem

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Cracking the Code of Effective Teaching

A review of Elizabeth Green’s “Building a Better Teacher”

Student Achievement Gains at KIPP Schools Cannot Be Explained by Student Attrition

Study finds students are similar to those in other local schools and most patterns of attrition are no different

Does Student Attrition Explain KIPP’s Success?

Evidence on which students leave KIPP middle schools and who replaces them

FALL 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 4

Inside Successful District-Charter Compacts

Teachers and administrators collaborate to share best practices

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Accountability for Students: Exit Exams

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools, a new book edited by Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Richard Sousa

Expand Your Reach

New-world role combines coaching teachers and teaching students

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Reporting Opinion, Shaping an Agenda

A review of ‘Teachers Versus the Public,’ by Paul E. Peterson, Michael Henderson and Martin R. West

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Beyond the Factory Model

Oakland teachers learn how to blend

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Standards and Testing in the Obama Administration

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools

Catholic School Closures and the Decline of Urban Neighborhoods

A review of ‘Lost Classroom, Lost Community’ by Margaret F. Brinig and Nicole Stelle Garnett

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Ending Our Neglect of Gifted Students

It’s a matter of fairness, equal opportunity , and long-term societal well-being.

Addressing Race Disparities in K‒12 School Discipline

Does the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education’s “Dear Colleague Letter” miss the mark on civil-rights enforcement?

Civil Rights Enforcement Gone Haywire

The federal government’s new school-discipline policy

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Learning in the Digital Age

Better educational apps are coming

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Still Reforming after All These Years

A conversation with Houston Independent School District Superintendent Terry Grier

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Charters Should Be Expected to Serve All Kinds of Students

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

School Quality Matters Most, Whether District or Charter

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Education Next talks with Robin J. Lake, Gary Miron, and Pedro A. Noguera

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

The Key Is Innovation, Not Regulation

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Facing the Union Challenge

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead

Script Doctors

A compelling play on the wrong stage?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Early Teacher Retirement Program Does Not Adversely Affect Student Achievement

Program costly, but in low-income schools small learning gains observed

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Expanding the Options

The United States has expanded school choice in the last few decades, and much of the published world’s research has been carried out in this country.

U.S. Students from Educated Families Fall Short in Math Proficiency on Global Stage

U.S. ranks 27th out of 34 OECD countries overall; 28th among students with at least one college-educated parent

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Credit Recovery Hits the Mainstream

Accountability lags for online options

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

How Private Schools Adapt to Vouchers: Eden Grove Academy

This case study is drawn from “Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.”

Early Retirement Payoff

Incentive programs for veteran teachers may boost student achievement

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Despite Success in New York City, It’s Time for Charters to Guard Their Flanks

School districts and teachers unions are fighting charters with renewed energy.

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Texas Ten Percent Plan Brings More Students to State’s Flagship Universities

But automatic admission causes drop in comparable private and out-of-state colleges

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Texas Ten Percent Plan’s Impact on College Enrollment

Students go to public universities instead of private ones

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

No Progress Report

A review of Christina Hoff Sommers’ ‘The War Against Boys’

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Evidence In Education: A Look to the Future

The education research community needs to create a supply of research findings that are of immediate relevance to workaday decision-making

College Prep for All?

Education Next talks with Cynthia G. Brown and Robert Schwartz

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Multiple Pathways Can Better Serve Students

Part of a forum on College Prep for All?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

All Students Need Common Foundational Skills

Part of a forum on College Prep for All?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Transforming Via Technology: Competition and Choice

What happens when choice is extended to cyberspace

Teacher of the Year to Union President

Lily Eskelsen García is poised to take over at the NEA

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Education Iron Triangle

An excerpt from Teachers Versus the Public

Making the Trade

Offering noncollege options to students

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Can We Get Governance Right?

How to fix public education governance in the United States is not a new question.

California’s Districts of Choice

A handful of entrepreneurial superintendents compete for students

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

How Private Schools Adapt to Vouchers: St. Patrick of Heatherdowns

This case study is drawn from “Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.”

Comparing Public Schools to Private

Lubienskis’ conclusions rely on flawed research design

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Evidence-based Debates on Teacher Quality

The world of education is moving steadily toward reliance on evidence, even with the possibility for misinterpretation.

Uncommon Success

A conversation with Brett Peiser

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Are the States Implementing Common Core?

Two experts identify implementation challenges and offer different assessments of progress thus far.

Summer 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 3

Navigating the Common Core

Complexities threaten implementation

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Common Core Takes Hold

Implementation moves steadily forward

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Bayou Backdown?

Obama administration retreats on vouchers

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

MOOCs for High School

Unlocking opportunities or substandard learning?

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Rewarding and Employing Teachers Based on Their Value-Added

Paying teachers in a manner that is competitive with private sector rewards

The Curriculum Wars Live On: Two Contemporary Flash Points

An excerpt from ‘What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools’

Mayoral Control in the Windy City

Emanuel battles to improve Chicago schools

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Ballots Not Barristers

Arizona case shows limits of litigation

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Supplementing College Tuition Improves Grades of African American Students

Study finds promise of non-merit-based academic college scholarship significantly decreases school-wide suspensions in urban school district.

The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship

College funds boost grades of African American students

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Should Pell Grants Target the College-Ready?

Education Next talks with Isabel Sawhill and Sara Goldrick-Rab

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Target Aid to Students Most Likely to Succeed

The cost of college has been rising at an unsustainable rate. The federal government has tried to soften the impact of these increases on families and students by providing more assistance in the form of loans, grants, and tax credits.

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Conditional Pell Dollars Miss Students Who Need Them Most

If the goal is to increase the cost-effectiveness of the Pell Grant program rather than simply cheapening it, policymakers should refocus their sights on the real problem: we spend a lot on financial aid but spending alone is insufficient to make college truly affordable.

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Moving the Education Needle

A conversation with Scott Hamilton

SPRING 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 2

Blog Posts/Multimedia

Ed Next Book Club: Dana Goldstein on The Teacher Wars

Mike Petrilli interviews Dana Goldstein about her new book on teachers.

09/17/2014

Demonstrate College Readiness If You Want a Federal Grant or Loan

Before receiving a federal grant that never needs to be repaid (as is the case with Pell grants and some loans), the recipient should demonstrate that they are worthy of support by passing an appropriate set of examinations.

09/17/2014

Classroom Observations Offer Biggest Room for Improvement in Teacher Evaluations

Addressing the design flaws we have identified in teacher evaluation systems will bring districts closer to achieving the primary goal of meaningful teacher evaluation: assuring greater equity in students’ access to good teachers.

09/17/2014

Wurman Testimony on Math and Science Standards in Ohio

This testimony was presented before the Ohio House Rules and Reference Committee by Ze’ev Wurman, visiting scholar at the Hoover Institution, on Aug. 20, 2014.

09/17/2014

What We’re Watching: Embrace the Common Core

IntelligenceSquared recently hosted a debate on the Common Core which featured two Ed Next editors – Rick Hess and Mike Petrilli – on opposite sides.

09/16/2014

Never Diet Without a Bathroom Scale and Mirror: The Case for Combining Teacher Evaluation and the Common Core

Schools should seize this window of transition—when it is safest for teachers to ask for help (and for instructional leaders to offer it)—to completely reinvent the teacher evaluation process.

09/15/2014

K-12 Leaders & Laggards Circa 2014: How the States Are Doing

Leaders & Laggards grades each state on how it’s doing in 11 areas, using an A to F scale.

09/15/2014

Empirical Proof on the Politics of Pensions

Pension benefit increases have been a painless way for politicians from both parties to provide something tangible to powerful interest groups without having to pay the costs immediately.

09/15/2014

Behind the Headline: EdX Enters K-12 Arena with High School Level MOOCs

In its first venture into the world of K-12 education, EdX announced that it will release 26 free online courses covering AP and high school level material.

09/15/2014

The First Hard Evidence on Virtual Education

Florida high school students taking Algebra or English I online perform at least as well on state math and reading tests as do students taking the same courses in a traditional format.

09/12/2014

Common Core and the Era of Good Behavior

The moderating of the debate over the Common Core seems to be mirroring the field’s increased focus on implementation.

09/12/2014

A Quick Note to Dana Goldstein About Pensions

No one is seriously advocating for reducing the pensions of any individual teachers or retirees.

09/12/2014

The Challenges of AP History: Are You Sure You Want College Credit?

The trickle downward of university curricular mischief into our schools and other institutions continues unabated, and it’s not a problem that the College Board alone can solve.

09/11/2014

Smart Markets, Diverse Options, and Burke’s Caution

Mike McShane’s new book Education and Opportunity offers a sophisticated view of public school markets, how to understand them, use their strength, and appreciate their limitations.

09/11/2014

The Problems and Promise of Common Core

In a video roundtable, HGSE experts explore the challenges of implementing America’s new standards.

09/10/2014

What We’re Watching: OECD Test for Schools

Schools that want to see if they are holding their students to high standards can test their students using an exam given around the globe. A story on PBS Newshour takes a close look at the test.

09/10/2014

What Parents Think About Their Public Schools

If one judged public opinion by conventional public discourse, one would soon conclude that parents in the United States are neatly divided between devotees of district-operated schools and choiceniks determined to avoid them. But Americans are a good deal more practical than that.

09/10/2014

Barbara Dreyer: A Champ to the End

Barbara helped create the K–12 online-learning movement, a powerful disruptive force that has the potential to create a more personalized and equitable education system that is student-centered so that all students can succeed.

09/10/2014

What We’re Watching: Building a Better Teacher

Fordham hosted a conversation with Elizabeth Green, author of Building a Better Teacher, on Tuesday, Sept. 2.

09/10/2014

How Self-Driving Cars Will Enable Greater School Choice

Transportation is a significant roadblock to exercising educational choice, but a new technology promises to greatly expand the number of schools that are logistically feasible for students to attend.

09/09/2014

Connecting the Dots: E. D. Hirsch, Jr., and Common Core

On Politico’s list of fifty “thinkers, doers and dreamers who really matter,” sharing the number eight spot are E.D. Hirsch and David Coleman, the principal author of the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts.

09/09/2014

Diagnosing the Right Pension Problems

When the public is led to believe financial issues are the only problems with today’s pension plans, financial issues will be the only problems legislators seek to address.

09/09/2014

How the Common Core Suppresses Competitive Federalism

Nationalizing standards and tests would eliminate them as differentiated school-reform instruments that could be used by states in competition over educational attainment.

09/08/2014

Restarting the Common Core Debate

A raucous debate has emerged over the Common Core, a debate been marked by acrimony rather than analysis, but there is hope that both sides want a reset.

09/08/2014

The Inconsistent Implementation of Teacher Evaluation Reforms

Contrary to claims that teacher evaluation reforms are leading to strict, one-size-fits-all policies, data suggests that local districts are implementing state-based teacher evaluation reforms inconsistently.

09/08/2014

Behind the Headline: Education Department Proposes Big Changes to School Improvement Grant Program

The U.S. Department of Education will release new guidance this morning for struggling schools that receive federal funds under the School Improvement Grant (SIG) program.

09/08/2014

What We’re Watching: Paul E. Peterson Interviews James Ryan for HarvardX Course

As part of his HarvardX course, Paul E. Peterson discusses desegregation with Jim Ryan, the dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

09/07/2014

Ferguson, Reparations, and Institutional Roots

The most convincing argument against conservatism is that by defending longstanding institutions it ends up protecting longstanding injustices.

09/05/2014

Three Insights on “Self-Directed Learning”—and How to Aim for Equity

The real innovation behind Summit Public Schools’ work is that it appears its teachers and leaders are beginning to identify, in this new context, what role to play when and for which students.

09/05/2014

We’ll Miss You, Graham Down

Graham was as close to a Renaissance man as we have known in person.

09/05/2014

Making Sense of the Ed-Reform Backlash

Our challenge as reformers is, first and foremost, stopping the one-size-fits-all policies, the top-down mandates that apply to all schools, in all situations

09/04/2014

10 School Reform Phrases That Should Trigger Your BS Detector

Left unchallenged, pat phrases allow wishful thinking to stand in for messy realities.

09/04/2014

The Fall 2014 Issue of Education Next Is Here

The Fall 2014 issue of Education Next is now available online.

09/03/2014

Choice and a Liberal Education

I’m interested in the arts and humanities because I’m interested in education including some understanding of the human condition. But I’m also interested in choice because that’s how I believe the humanities are most likely to be pursued and effectively promoted.

09/03/2014

What We’re Watching: Common Core on Washington Journal

Mike Petrilli and Neal McCluskey discuss the Common Core State Standards Initiative on CSPAN’s Washington Journal.

09/03/2014

Remembering Graham Down

We are saddened to note that A. Graham Down passed away last weekend in Washington, D.C.

09/02/2014

Is Arne Duncan’s Teacher Evaluation Moratorium Unnecessary?

Despite state policy changes, many districts still don’t factor student growth into teacher evaluation ratings in a meaningful way.

09/02/2014

Public School Groups Sue to Limit Public’s Educational Options

Florida’s teachers union, school administrators association, and school boards association have sued to kill an education tax credit program that benefits 60,000 low income, mostly black and Hispanic children

09/02/2014

Thanks, Bobby Jindal!

When the court decides, as it almost certainly has to that, in fact, no one forced Louisiana or any other state to adopt Common Core, the most effective anti-Common Core argument goes, “Poof!”

08/29/2014
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