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The Myth About the Special Education Gap

Charter enrollments driven by parental choices, not discriminatory policies

FALL 2015 / NO. 15, VOL. 4

Charter Schools Do Not Appear to Discriminate Against Special Education Students

Students with disabilities more likely to remain in charters than in district schools

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Results of President Obama’s Race to the Top

Win or lose, states enacted education reforms

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

What Did Race to the Top Accomplish?

Education Next talks with Joanne Weiss and Frederick M. Hess

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Lofty Promises But Little Change for America’s Schools

In July 2009, it wasn’t just about the money. The $4 billion (to be spent over four years) amounted to less than 1 percent of what K‒12 schooling spends each year.

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Innovative Program Spurred Meaningful Education Reform

Much has been said about the impact of the Race to the Top program—some good, some not so good, some accurate, some less so.

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Race to the Top Competition Changes State Education Policies

Winners enact new initiatives, strengthen standards and expand charters

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Should Personalization Be the Future of Learning?

Benjamin Riley and Alex Hernandez square off

Wisconsin High School Reaches High International Benchmarks in Math and Reading

Participating in international testing motivates both educators and students

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Wisconsin High Schools Learn from New PISA Test

International comparison drives efforts to improve

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

A Day at the Khan Lab School

Inquiry and self-direction guide student learning

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Digital Games Promise to Improve Math Skills

An excerpt from Greg Toppo’s The Game Believes in You

Disparate Impact Indeed

Court’s latest ruling will hurt minority students

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 5

Tracking Is a District Problem

A review of “On the Same Track” by Carol Corbett Burris

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Taking On the Opportunity Gap

A review of “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis” by Robert D. Putnam

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Increased Per-Pupil Spending Yields Improved Educational Attainment and Higher Future Wages for Students from Low-Income Families

How money is spent matters; school districts use unexpected increases more productively than they use other resources

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings

Does school spending matter after all?

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15., NO. 4

CREDO Reveals Successful Charters’ Secret Sauce

What are the general lessons to be learned from the many case studies of successful chartering?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Power to the People

A review of “The School Choice Journey” by Thomas Stewart and Patrick J. Wolf

The Origins of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

Excerpts from No Struggle, No Progress: A Warrior’s Life from Black Power to Education 
Reform

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

At Success Academy, Strong Content and Curriculum are Keys to Success

Progressive education techniques and innovative teacher training help the charters outperform NYC public schools

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Explains Success at Success Academy?

Charter network focuses on what is being taught, and how

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Twitter Says about the Education Policy Debate

And how scholars might use it as a research tool

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Breaking the Mold

A review of A Democratic Constitution for Public Education, by Paul T. Hill and Ashley E. Jochim

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

How NYC Expanded Its Charter Sector

An excerpt from Joel Klein’s Lessons of Hope

States Raise Proficiency Standards in Math and Reading

Commitments to Common Core may be driving the proficiency bar upward

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

More Middle-Class Families Choose Charters

A political game changer for public school choice?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The Rise of AltSchool and Other Micro-schools

Combinations of private, blended, and at-home schooling meet needs of individual students

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Turnaround School Districts

States try managing lowest-performing schools

Boot Camps for Charter Boards

Finding and training civic-minded leaders

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

New York City’s Small-Schools Revolution

Breaking up large high schools improved graduation rates

School Reform for Rural America

Innovate with charters, expand career and technical education

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

School Closings Due to Bad Weather Have Little to No Effect on Student Achievement

But individual absences caused by weather when schools don’t close have negative effects on achievement

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

In Defense of Snow Days

Students who stay home when school is in session are a much larger problem

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

We’re All Art Teachers

Don’t try to quantify its worth

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Twenty States Increased Academic Proficiency Standards between 2011 and 2013

For the first time since the passage of No Child Left Behind, state standards have risen; all states that show strong improvements have adopted Common Core

A Breakout Role for Teachers

Excerpts from The Cage-Busting Teacher

How Many Charter Schools is Just Right?

Education Next talks with Scott Pearson, John H. “Skip” McKoy, and Neerav Kingsland

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The New Orleans Case for All-Charter School Districts

Across the country, children in urban districts are being denied rich, rigorous educational opportunities.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

D.C. Students Benefit from Mix of Charter and Traditional Schools

Charter schools are revolutionizing public schooling in Washington, D.C. In just 18 years, charter schools have grown from an initial 5 to 112 schools today, managed by 61 nonprofit organizations.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Education Gap Grows for Adolescents from Single-Parent Families

Young people raised in one-parent homes complete fewer years of schooling and are less likely to receive a B. A. degree

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to children of unmarried mothers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

One-Parent Students Leave School Earlier

Education attainment gap widens

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Fool’s Gold

Office of Civil Rights takes on school finance

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Match Corps Goes National

Successful high-dosage tutoring model spreads to other schools

How Can Schools Address America’s Marriage Crisis?

Prepare young people for rewarding careers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Purposeful Parenthood

Better planning benefits new parents and their children

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

The Meaning of Community at Democracy Prep

School culture supports students and their families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Black Men and the Struggle for Work

Social and economic barriers persist

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

More Harm Than Good

A review of “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed,” by Jason L. Riley

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

A Tribute to Martha Derthick

With Martha Derthick’s passing on January 12, 2015, America lost one of its preeminent scholars of American politics.

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

New Hampshire’s Journey Toward Competency-Based Education

State lifts barriers to innovation, allowing districts and charters to personalize learning

Family Breakdown and Poverty

To flourish, our nation must face some hard truths

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Race and Poverty in Baltimore

A review of “The Long Shadow” by Karl Alexander, Doris Entwisle, and Linda Olson

Spring 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

U.S. Students from Two-Parent Families Achieve a Grade Level Higher than Peers from Single-Parent Families

The United States has one of the highest percentages of single-parent families among developed countries

An International Look at the Single-Parent Family

Family structure matters more for U.S. students

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

What Does Online Learning Look Like?

Examples from Florida and Pennsylvania

50 Years after the Moynihan Report, More than One-Quarter of Young Black Males Are Neither Employed nor Enrolled in School or Vocational Training

The incarceration rate for young black men without a high school diploma rose from 10 percent in 1980 to 37 percent by 2008

Government Should Subsidize, Not Tax, Marriage

Social policies have influenced the rate of growth in single-parent families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Wrong Diagnosis on Homework Help from Parents

A review of “The Broken Compass: Parental Involvement with Children’s Education” by Keith Robinson and Angel L. Harris

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Single-Parent Families: Revisiting the Moynihan Report 50 Years Later

An event will take place on March 5 in Washington, D.C.

An Uncommon Leader

A review of No Struggle, No Progress by Howard Fuller

Does Better Observation Make Better Teachers?

New evidence from a 
teacher evaluation pilot in Chicago

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

NYC’s Former Schools Chancellor Recounts Struggles and Successes

A review of Joel Klein’s “Lessons of Hope”

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Moynihan and the Single-Parent Family

The 1965 report and its backlash

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

In the U.S., Nearly a Quarter of All Children Live with an Unmarried Mother

50 years after the Moynihan Report, the percentage of children in mother-only families has risen from around 25% to 50% among blacks, and around 7% to 19% among whites.

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Revisiting the Moynihan Report on its 50th Anniversary

Education Next is running a series of articles on the state of the American family.

Modern Maturity for Charter Schools

Litigation shows they have arrived

Top 10 Education Next Blog Entries of 2014

A list of lists

The Top Education Next Articles of 2014

Just the facts, please!

Blog Posts/Multimedia

Behind the Headline: BASIS, One of America’s Top Charter School Networks, Seeks New Turf: China

BASIS schools, which began as a network of academically challenging charter schools and now include private schools, will open a new school in China.

07/29/2015

What We’re Listening To: Michael McShane Banters About Education Entrepreneurship

Mike McShane discusses a recent conference AEI held on the state of education entrepreneurship in K-12 education.

07/29/2015

Education Reformers Need To Look Beyond Ideas, Ideology, and Innovation and Learn About The Efforts That Preceded Them

Schools have been around forever. There are mountains of accumulated wisdom to study if we’re willing to look up from our Twitter feeds.

07/29/2015

Public Supports Testing, Opposes Opt-Out, Opposes Federal Intervention

If those in our nation’s capital want to modify federal education policy along lines preferred by the public at large, they will enact a law that resembles the bipartisan bill passed by the Senate.

07/28/2015

School Pension Costs Have Doubled Over the Last Decade, Now Top $1,000 Per Pupil Nationally

Employer pension costs represent a significant drain on resources that might otherwise have been available for classroom expenditures.

07/28/2015

Behind the Headline: Quality of Teacher Hires Improved During the Recession, Analysis Finds

A new study finds that teachers hired during recession periods are more effective in math than teachers who are hired in more secure times because stronger applicants apply for teaching jobs when the economy is not doing well.

07/28/2015

Graduation Rates Are Insufficient as an Accountability Measure

Graduation rates don’t tell us very much about whether students are prepared for life after graduation.

07/27/2015

Diane Ravitch, Union Shops and the Education Next Poll

If you don’t like the message, kill the messenger

07/27/2015

Behind the Headline: Missing, Messy Teacher-Prep Data Stumps Even Federal Watchdog

A new report by the Government Accountability Office finds that many states are not complying with a requirement under the Higher Education Act that they evaluate teacher education programs and identify “at risk” and “low performing” programs.

07/27/2015

What We’re Watching: Dual Credit STEM Courses In Chicago High Schools

Chicago Public Television looks at five high schools where students are earning college credit through an early college program.

07/25/2015

Privacy Push Must Not Prevent Personalized Learning

The fierce debate over the privacy of student data often risks preventing students from benefiting from the enormous breakthroughs that technology makes possible in 21st century schools.

07/24/2015

In God We Trust; All Others Bring Data

I promise that you’ll learn interesting stuff by just spending some time with “Conditions of Education.” And maybe if we all do that, our debates would be a bit more fruitful and a bit less contentious.

07/23/2015

Behind the Headline: Arne Duncan’s Wrong Turn on Reform: How Federal Dollars Fueled the Testing Backlash

In an article for The 74, the new reform-oriented education news website launched by Campbell Brown, Matt Barnum looks at the impact of the Obama administration’s decision, in 2009, to push states applying for Race to the Top funds to come up with ways to evaluate all teachers based in part on student test scores.

07/23/2015

Pre-K and Charter Schools: Where State Policies Create Barriers to Collaboration

Why is it so difficult for America’s high-impact, “no-excuses” charter schools to participate in pre-K programs?

07/23/2015

Behind the Headline: Facing Decline, Catholic Schools Form a Charter-Like Network

Six Catholic schools in East Harlem and the South Bronx have banded together into a network managed by a new group called the Partnership for Inner City Education, which signed an 11-year contract with the Archdiocese of New York to run the schools.

07/23/2015

The Hard Work Has Just Begun

Getting low-income “first-generation” kids into college is hard. Getting them to graduate from college is harder.

07/22/2015

The Contours of a Deal on ESEA Are In Sight

What will survive, what will be eliminated, and what’s still up in the air

07/22/2015

What We’re Listening To: Sometimes A Little More Minecraft May Be Quite All Right

How much screen time is too much if the game is educational? Sarah Tribble of NPR investigates.

07/22/2015

What We’re Watching: What Is Student Data?

A new video from the Data Quality Campaign shows the kinds of data that can be used to help educators and parents support student learning.

07/22/2015

Opportunity Culture Outcomes: The First Two Years

Can we work together to change policies and systems to support giving every student access to excellent teaching, and giving every teacher outstanding career opportunities without being forced up and out of the classroom?

07/21/2015

Not in the Right Ballpark

A continuation of the debate over a study on the impact of school spending by C. Kirabo Jackson, Rucker C. Johnson, and Claudia Persico

07/20/2015

Eye-Opening Stats About High School and College Dropouts

American adults in the 1940s had about the same odds of being a high school graduate as today’s Americans have of being a college graduate.

07/20/2015

Behind the Headline: These Phone Notifications Could Actually Change Your Kid’s Life

A study finds that text messages sent to the parents of preschoolers encouraging them to engage in literacy-boosting activities has a positive impact on literacy skills.

07/20/2015

Behind the Headline: The Bizarre Alliance Between Republicans and Teachers Unions, Explained

Last week, the U.S. Senate passed the Every Child Achieves Act by a vote of 81-17. The Every Child Achieves act would keep the testing requirements from No Child Left Behind but allow states to come up with their own systems for holding schools accountable for results.

07/20/2015

Money Does Matter After All

A response to Eric Hanushek

07/17/2015

Money Matters After All?

A response to Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings by C. Kirabo Jackson, Rucker C. Johnson, and Claudia Persico

07/17/2015

Teachers and the Public Oppose Agency Fees Charged By Teachers Unions

Judging by a recent survey, a plurality of the American public and an equally large share of teachers oppose forced union payments.

07/16/2015

Implementing Common Core: The Problem of Instructional Time

This is part two of my analysis of instruction and Common Core’s implementation.

07/16/2015

Faith, Hope, and Hard Work: Reflections on Year One of Partnership Schools

June marked the end of my first year as superintendent of Partnership Schools, a nonprofit school management organization that was granted broad authority to manage and operate six K–8 urban Catholic schools.

07/15/2015

Why Aren’t NAEP Scores for High School Students Going Up?

And how do we kickstart achievement for high school students?

07/15/2015

What We’re Watching: Campbell Brown Launches The Seventy Four

Former CNN anchor Campbell Brown has launched an education-focused website called The Seventy Four.

07/13/2015

Is a Massive New Set of Federal Regulations the Best Way to Reform Head Start?

Head Start is an example of sound impulses gone missing into the jungles of governmental extravagance and bureaucracy.

07/13/2015

Chicago Made Its $634 Million Pension Payment, but Still Shortchanges Teachers

Because of post-recession pension cuts, new teachers in Chicago were placed in a less-generous plan and will face negative net benefits for their first two decades of service.

07/13/2015

What We’re Watching: What Should Replace No Child Left Behind?

Rick Hess and Bob Wise appear on PBS NewsHour to talk about how federal education policy should work in a post-NCLB world.

07/13/2015

Behind the Headline: The Next Phase of D.C. Education Reform

In the Washington Post, Richard Whitmire writes about a new report from the National Research Council that finds that students in Washington, D.C., including low-income minority students, are doing better.

07/12/2015

What We’re Watching: Blended Learning in a Pod at Intrinsic Schools

WTTW takes a look at Intrinsic Schools, a Chicago blended-learning charter school

07/11/2015

A Checklist for Fixing ESEA

Things are moving rapidly here in DC. Yesterday, on a 218-213 vote, the House narrowly passed the Student Success Act.

07/09/2015

Behind the Headline: Advocates for Arts Education May be Doing More Harm Than Good

An article in the Hechinger Report examines possible reasons for the decline in arts education, focusing on the idea that education today emphasizes skills over the humanities.

07/09/2015

Behind the Headline: States Still Differ Dramatically In Their Academic Expectations, Study Finds

A new report released by the National Center for Education Statistics finds that states vary in where they set their proficiency standards, reports Joy Resmovits. The study converted states’ cutoff scores on their own 2012-2013 state tests to where those scores would fall on the NAEP scale.

07/09/2015
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