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Top 10 Education Next Blog Entries of 2014

A list of lists

The Top Education Next Articles of 2014

Just the facts, please!

In the U.S., Nearly a Quarter of All Children Live with an Unmarried Mother

50 years after the Moynihan Report, the percentage of children in mother-only families has risen from around 25% to 50% among blacks, and around 7% to 19% among whites.

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Revisiting the Moynihan Report on its 50th Anniversary

Education Next is running a series of articles on the state of the American family.

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to the children of unmarried mothers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Moynihan and the Single-Parent Family

The 1965 report and its backlash

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Modern Maturity for Charter Schools

Litigation shows they have arrived

Does Better Observation Make Better Teachers?

New evidence from a 
teacher evaluation pilot in Chicago

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Moving Toward a Teaching Profession

A review of The Teacher Wars by Dana Goldstein

No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Also teacher grades, school choices, and other findings from the 2014 EdNext poll. Full results also available at education next.org/edfacts

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Fixing Detroit’s 
Broken School System

Improve accountability 
and oversight for district and charter schools

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Jeb Bush Speaks Out

Talking education policy with Florida’s former governor

Rethinking the 
High School Diploma

Education Next talks with 
Chester E. Finn, Jr., Richard D. Kahlenberg and Sandy Kress

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Common Core in the Classroom

New standards help teachers create effective lesson plans

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, No. 1

Disruptive Innovation in Practice

A review of Michael B. Horn’s and Heather Staker’s “Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Teachers Unions and the Common Core

Standards inspire collaboration and dissent

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

A New Breed of Journalism

Education coverage is on the rise

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Experimental Study Shows Major Benefits for Students Who Attend Live Theater

Culturally enriching field trips increase knowledge, tolerance, and the ability to read emotions of others

Learning from Live Theater

Students realize gains in knowledge, tolerance, and more

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Methodological Appendix for the Live Theater Experimental Study

Learning from Live Theater Education Next, Winter 2015 Empirical Strategy Because the randomized controlled trial approach has the important feature of generating comparable treatment and control groups, we can use a straightforward set of analytic techniques, designed for use in social experiments, to estimate the impact of a school field trip to see live theater […]

Criticizing Charter Schools for Lacking Diversity and Unions Misses the Point

A review of A Smarter Charter by Richard D. Kahlenberg and Halley Potter

What Effective Schools Do

Stretching the cognitive limits on achievement

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Teachers Unions and the War Within

Making sense of the conflict

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Diplomas Must Recognize College and Career Readiness

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Hold Students Accountable and Support Them

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Different Kids Need Different Credentials

Forum: Rethinking the High School Diploma

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Does Student Attrition Explain KIPP’s Success?

Evidence on which students leave KIPP middle schools and who replaces them

FALL 2014 / Vol. 14, No. 4

Disrupting 
the Education 
Monopoly

A conversation with
 Netflix CEO Reed Hastings

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

The Philadelphia School District’s Ongoing Financial Crisis

Why the district has a money problem

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Collective Panic

Court decision terrifies unions

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Substantial Opportunities for Improving Teacher Evaluations Lie in the Area of Classroom Observations

Researchers recommend adjusting classroom observation scores for student demographics, using observations conducted by trained external observers

The Force Behind Sisulu-Walker

A review of Mary C. Bounds’ “A Light Shines in Harlem: New York’s First Charter School and the Movement It Led”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Effective Schools Help Students Outperform Expectations Based on Cognitive Skills

Differences in school effectiveness have important consequences for students’ academic achievement.

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Support for Common Core Slips, But Majority of Public Still In Favor

2014 EdNext poll finds while the public, on average, gives 50% of teachers in their local schools an A or a B grade, 22% are given a D or an F

Inside Successful District-Charter Compacts

Teachers and administrators collaborate to share best practices

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Cracking the Code of Effective Teaching

A review of Elizabeth Green’s “Building a Better Teacher”

Student Achievement Gains at KIPP Schools Cannot Be Explained by Student Attrition

Study finds students are similar to those in other local schools and most patterns of attrition are no different

Accountability for Students: Exit Exams

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools, a new book edited by Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Richard Sousa

Expand Your Reach

New-world role combines coaching teachers and teaching students

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Reporting Opinion, Shaping an Agenda

A review of ‘Teachers Versus the Public,’ by Paul E. Peterson, Michael Henderson and Martin R. West

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Beyond the Factory Model

Oakland teachers learn how to blend

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Standards and Testing in the Obama Administration

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead for America’s Children and Their Schools

Catholic School Closures and the Decline of Urban Neighborhoods

A review of ‘Lost Classroom, Lost Community’ by Margaret F. Brinig and Nicole Stelle Garnett

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Ending Our Neglect of Gifted Students

It’s a matter of fairness, equal opportunity , and long-term societal well-being.

Addressing Race Disparities in K‒12 School Discipline

Does the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Education’s “Dear Colleague Letter” miss the mark on civil-rights enforcement?

Civil Rights Enforcement Gone Haywire

The federal government’s new school-discipline policy

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Learning in the Digital Age

Better educational apps are coming

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Still Reforming after All These Years

A conversation with Houston Independent School District Superintendent Terry Grier

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Charters Should Be Expected to Serve All Kinds of Students

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

School Quality Matters Most, Whether District or Charter

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Education Next talks with Robin J. Lake, Gary Miron, and Pedro A. Noguera

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

The Key Is Innovation, Not Regulation

Part of the forum: Should Charter Schools Enroll More Special Education Students?

Facing the Union Challenge

An excerpt from What Lies Ahead

Script Doctors

A compelling play on the wrong stage?

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Early Teacher Retirement Program Does Not Adversely Affect Student Achievement

Program costly, but in low-income schools small learning gains observed

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 1

Expanding the Options

The United States has expanded school choice in the last few decades, and much of the published world’s research has been carried out in this country.

U.S. Students from Educated Families Fall Short in Math Proficiency on Global Stage

U.S. ranks 27th out of 34 OECD countries overall; 28th among students with at least one college-educated parent

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

U.S. Students from Educated Families Lag in International Tests

It’s not just about kids in poor neighborhoods

FALL 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 4

Credit Recovery Hits the Mainstream

Accountability lags for online options

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

How Private Schools Adapt to Vouchers: Eden Grove Academy

This case study is drawn from “Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.”

Early Retirement Payoff

Incentive programs for veteran teachers may boost student achievement

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Despite Success in New York City, It’s Time for Charters to Guard Their Flanks

School districts and teachers unions are fighting charters with renewed energy.

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Texas Ten Percent Plan Brings More Students to State’s Flagship Universities

But automatic admission causes drop in comparable private and out-of-state colleges

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

The Texas Ten Percent Plan’s Impact on College Enrollment

Students go to public universities instead of private ones

SUMMER 2014 / VOL. 14, NO. 3

Blog Posts/Multimedia

The Reading Paradox: How Standards Mislead Teachers

We must stop trying to teach reading the way we teach math.

12/22/2014

Behind the Headline: The Unbelievable Rise of Single Motherhood in America Over the Last 50 Years

In the Washington Post, Emily Badger describes the dramatic changes in family structure that have taken place in the U.S. over the past 50 years.

12/22/2014

Conundrums in Competency

There seems to be growing enthusiasm for adopting competency-based approaches, but there are some philosophical and practical areas that administrators are still grappling with.

12/22/2014

Cisco Networking Academy Provides Clues For Future Of Testing

The online training program’s diverse assessment system and its flexibility should help us move toward a competency-based learning system in which time is variable but learning is constant.

12/19/2014

What We’re Listening To: How Does A Principal Work?

KIPP Academy Middle School principal Andrew Rubin describes his workday on this edition of Slate’s Working podcast.

12/19/2014

What We’re Watching: Our Voices Will Be Heard

The Partnership for Educational Justice interviews nine parents who are plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging teacher tenure laws in New York .

12/19/2014

How Congress Can Address Over-Testing Without Overreaching

Will Republicans eliminate No Child Left Behind’s annual testing requirement? They should eliminate the teacher evaluation mandate instead.

12/18/2014

Behind the Headline: Teach For America Facing Recruitment Challenges

Teach for America has notified its partner districts that it is on track to train a smaller corps of teachers this year, possibly falling short of demand for its teachers by 25 percent.

12/18/2014

Simply By Forming an Exploratory Committee, Jeb Bush Places School Reform on the National Agenda

In 2016 neither Jeb Bush’s Republican primary opponents nor Hillary Clinton nor even Elizabeth Warren will be able to ignore the poor state of the nation’s schools. For they will be facing a candidate with the strongest school reform credentials any presidential candidate has ever had.

12/17/2014

TNTP Reimagines Blended Teaching

A new paper describes the roles and essential competencies of blended-learning teachers and provides guidance to school leaders for recruiting and selecting blended-learning teachers.

12/17/2014

Yong Zhao’s Biting Critique of the Chinese Edu-Miracle

Zhao’s writing flags the stifling nature of regulation and celebrates the creative power of entrepreneur-oriented education.

12/17/2014

What We’re Watching: Will Regulation Ruin School Choice in New Orleans?

ReasonTV looks at how choice has changed public schooling in New Orleans and at what the future holds.

12/16/2014

Pension Theory Versus Pension Reality

In the fantasy world that the National Institute on Retirement Security has created, state pension plans do a bang-up job of delivering benefits to workers. That’s just not the reality of the world we live in.

12/16/2014

Homeostasis and the End of Today’s Era of Reform?

Three signs of homeostasis—a reversion to the old tried-and-true way of doing things.

12/15/2014

Charters Can Do What’s Best For Students Who Care

Schools of choice can make their discipline codes clear to incoming families (and teachers); those who find the approach too strict can go elsewhere.

12/15/2014

Have Democrats Failed the White Working Class?

McLanahan and Jencks provide data showing that growing up with one parent reduces chances of graduating high school by 40 percent

12/15/2014

It Pays to Increase Your Word Power

To grow up as the child of well-educated parents in an affluent American home is to hit the verbal lottery.

12/12/2014

Behind the Headline: Children of Married Parents More Likely to Do Extracurriculars, Survey Shows

According to a report from the Census Bureau, children who live with two married parents are much more likely to participate in extracurricular activities than children living with two unmarried parents or children living with single parents.

12/12/2014

What We’re Watching: Michael Horn iNACOL Keynote Speech

Michael Horn delivered a keynote address at this year’s iNACOL Blended and Online Learning Symposium.

12/11/2014

What Computer Science Education Can Tell Us About The Future Of Schools

Some of the pedagogical models we see emerging in computer science may be a harbinger of not just what we need to teach in the 21st century, but how we may come to teach it.

12/11/2014

Who Needs the Law When You Have OCR?

The Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights lacks any reasonable legal foundation for its adventures in educational management.

12/11/2014

Introductory Comments to “Education for Upward Mobility” Conference

The genesis of this conference was a feeling that we in the education-reform movement might be overly focused on college as the pathway to the middle class, and not focused enough on all of the other possible routes.

12/11/2014

Ed Next Book Club: Dana Goldstein on The Teacher Wars

Mike Petrilli interviews Dana Goldstein about her new book on teachers.

12/10/2014

inBloom’s Collapse Offers Lessons For Innovation In Education

inBloom, a non-profit that offered a data warehouse solution designed to help public schools embrace the promise of personalized learning, collapsed and has ceased to exist, as privacy concerns from interested parties mounted over a period of many months

12/10/2014

New Education Next Articles on the State of the American Family

For the next three months, Education Next will be running a series of articles on the state of the American family to mark the 50th anniversary year of the publication of The Moynihan Report.

12/09/2014

Predictions and Predilections for a New ESEA

Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act would show America that bipartisan governance is possible, even in Washington.

12/09/2014

What We’re Watching: Exploring the Success of Success Academy

AEI hosted a discussion with Success Academy founder and CEO Eva Moskowitz about the opportunities and challenges charter schools face in New York City.

12/08/2014

Dispelling Five Falsehoods About Newark’s School System

Having served as New Jersey’s Commissioner of Education from 2011 to 2014, I have had an inside view into efforts to improve Newark’s struggling school system.

12/08/2014

Behind the Headline: Principals’ Group Latest to Criticize ‘Value Added’ for Teacher Evaluations

The National Association of Secondary School Principals has given preliminary approval to a resolution against the use of value-added analysis to evaluate teachers.

12/05/2014

Pension Debt Crowds Out Other School Spending in Michigan

In Michigan, school funding has increased, but schools aren’t seeing much of the money. Instead, most of the funding increases are going toward paying off the state’s retirement debt.

12/05/2014

Are Formative Assessments Disrupting Summative Tests?

The potential for formative assessment to continuously expand and improve will be stunted so long as we perpetuate summative assessment regimes.

12/05/2014

Implementing Teacher Evaluation in New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Education has produced a report on the status of its new teacher evaluation efforts.

12/04/2014

Fact-Checking the Sun-Sentinel on School Choice

The Sun-Sentinel’s anti-school choice editorial rests on faulty evidence.

12/04/2014

Education Books Make Great Gifts

Our guide to the education policy books of 2014.

12/04/2014

The Perils of Edutourism

American adventurers have fanned out across the globe to bring back to the United States the lessons of other school systems. It might produce good journalism, but it also tends to produce very bad social science.

12/03/2014

Should Teaching “Soft” Skills Be A Priority?

An interview with Paul Tough, author of How Children Succeed

12/03/2014

Winter 2015 Issue of Education Next Now Available Online

Poll results on Common Core, changes in teachers union politics, how best to evaluate teachers, and more in the latest issue of Education Next.

12/03/2014

Punishing Achievement In Our Schools

The most recent exercise of mission creep and nanny-statism by the Office for Civil Rights involves what the enforcers call “equal access to educational resources.”

12/02/2014

Strong Charter Accountability in D.C.

In Washington, D.C., more kids are in high-performing charters, the number of high-performing charters is growing, and the number of struggling charters is shrinking. But why?

12/02/2014
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