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Wisconsin High School Reaches High International Benchmarks in Math and Reading

Participating in international testing motivates both educators and students

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Wisconsin High Schools Learn from New PISA Test

International comparison drives efforts to improve

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Digital Games Promise to Improve Math Skills

An excerpt from Greg Toppo’s The Game Believes in You

Tracking Is a District Problem

A review of “On the Same Track” by Carol Corbett Burris

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Taking On the Opportunity Gap

A review of “Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis” by Robert D. Putnam

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Increased Per-Pupil Spending Yields Improved Educational Attainment and Higher Future Wages for Students from Low-Income Families

How money is spent matters; school districts use unexpected increases more productively than they use other resources

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings

Does school spending matter after all?

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15., NO. 4

CREDO Reveals Successful Charters’ Secret Sauce

What are the general lessons to be learned from the many case studies of successful chartering?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Power to the People

A review of “The School Choice Journey” by Thomas Stewart and Patrick J. Wolf

The Origins of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

Excerpts from No Struggle, No Progress: A Warrior’s Life from Black Power to Education 
Reform

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

At Success Academy, Strong Content and Curriculum are Keys to Success

Progressive education techniques and innovative teacher training help the charters outperform NYC public schools

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Explains Success at Success Academy?

Charter network focuses on what is being taught, and how

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

What Twitter Says about the Education Policy Debate

And how scholars might use it as a research tool

FALL 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 4

Breaking the Mold

A review of A Democratic Constitution for Public Education, by Paul T. Hill and Ashley E. Jochim

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

How NYC Expanded Its Charter Sector

An excerpt from Joel Klein’s Lessons of Hope

States Raise Proficiency Standards in Math and Reading

Commitments to Common Core may be driving the proficiency bar upward

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Should Personalization Be the Future of Learning?

Benjamin Riley and Alex Hernandez square off

More Middle-Class Families Choose Charters

A political game changer for public school choice?

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The Rise of AltSchool and Other Micro-schools

Combinations of private, blended, and at-home schooling meet needs of individual students

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Turnaround School Districts

States try managing lowest-performing schools

Boot Camps for Charter Boards

Finding and training civic-minded leaders

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

New York City’s Small-Schools Revolution

Breaking up large high schools improved graduation rates

School Reform for Rural America

Innovate with charters, expand career and technical education

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

School Closings Due to Bad Weather Have Little to No Effect on Student Achievement

But individual absences caused by weather when schools don’t close have negative effects on achievement

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

In Defense of Snow Days

Students who stay home when school is in session are a much larger problem

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

We’re All Art Teachers

Don’t try to quantify its worth

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Twenty States Increased Academic Proficiency Standards between 2011 and 2013

For the first time since the passage of No Child Left Behind, state standards have risen; all states that show strong improvements have adopted Common Core

A Breakout Role for Teachers

Excerpts from The Cage-Busting Teacher

How Many Charter Schools is Just Right?

Education Next talks with Scott Pearson, John H. “Skip” McKoy, and Neerav Kingsland

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

The New Orleans Case for All-Charter School Districts

Across the country, children in urban districts are being denied rich, rigorous educational opportunities.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

D.C. Students Benefit from Mix of Charter and Traditional Schools

Charter schools are revolutionizing public schooling in Washington, D.C. In just 18 years, charter schools have grown from an initial 5 to 112 schools today, managed by 61 nonprofit organizations.

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Education Gap Grows for Adolescents from Single-Parent Families

Young people raised in one-parent homes complete fewer years of schooling and are less likely to receive a B. A. degree

Was Moynihan Right?

What happens to children of unmarried mothers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

One-Parent Students Leave School Earlier

Education attainment gap widens

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Fool’s Gold

Office of Civil Rights takes on school finance

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Match Corps Goes National

Successful high-dosage tutoring model spreads to other schools

How Can Schools Address America’s Marriage Crisis?

Prepare young people for rewarding careers

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Purposeful Parenthood

Better planning benefits new parents and their children

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

The Meaning of Community at Democracy Prep

School culture supports students and their families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Black Men and the Struggle for Work

Social and economic barriers persist

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

More Harm Than Good

A review of “Please Stop Helping Us: How Liberals Make It Harder for Blacks to Succeed,” by Jason L. Riley

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

A Tribute to Martha Derthick

With Martha Derthick’s passing on January 12, 2015, America lost one of its preeminent scholars of American politics.

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

New Hampshire’s Journey Toward Competency-Based Education

State lifts barriers to innovation, allowing districts and charters to personalize learning

Family Breakdown and Poverty

To flourish, our nation must face some hard truths

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Race and Poverty in Baltimore

A review of “The Long Shadow” by Karl Alexander, Doris Entwisle, and Linda Olson

Spring 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

U.S. Students from Two-Parent Families Achieve a Grade Level Higher than Peers from Single-Parent Families

The United States has one of the highest percentages of single-parent families among developed countries

An International Look at the Single-Parent Family

Family structure matters more for U.S. students

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

What Does Online Learning Look Like?

Examples from Florida and Pennsylvania

50 Years after the Moynihan Report, More than One-Quarter of Young Black Males Are Neither Employed nor Enrolled in School or Vocational Training

The incarceration rate for young black men without a high school diploma rose from 10 percent in 1980 to 37 percent by 2008

Government Should Subsidize, Not Tax, Marriage

Social policies have influenced the rate of growth in single-parent families

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

Wrong Diagnosis on Homework Help from Parents

A review of “The Broken Compass: Parental Involvement with Children’s Education” by Keith Robinson and Angel L. Harris

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Single-Parent Families: Revisiting the Moynihan Report 50 Years Later

An event will take place on March 5 in Washington, D.C.

An Uncommon Leader

A review of No Struggle, No Progress by Howard Fuller

Does Better Observation Make Better Teachers?

New evidence from a 
teacher evaluation pilot in Chicago

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

NYC’s Former Schools Chancellor Recounts Struggles and Successes

A review of Joel Klein’s “Lessons of Hope”

SUMMER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 3

Moynihan and the Single-Parent Family

The 1965 report and its backlash

SPRING 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 2

In the U.S., Nearly a Quarter of All Children Live with an Unmarried Mother

50 years after the Moynihan Report, the percentage of children in mother-only families has risen from around 25% to 50% among blacks, and around 7% to 19% among whites.

SPRING 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 2

Revisiting the Moynihan Report on its 50th Anniversary

Education Next is running a series of articles on the state of the American family.

Modern Maturity for Charter Schools

Litigation shows they have arrived

Top 10 Education Next Blog Entries of 2014

A list of lists

The Top Education Next Articles of 2014

Just the facts, please!

Moving Toward a Teaching Profession

A review of The Teacher Wars by Dana Goldstein

No Common Opinion on the Common Core

Also teacher grades, school choices, and other findings from the 2014 EdNext poll. Full results also available at education next.org/edfacts

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Fixing Detroit’s 
Broken School System

Improve accountability 
and oversight for district and charter schools

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Jeb Bush Speaks Out

Talking education policy with Florida’s former governor

Common Core in the Classroom

New standards help teachers create effective lesson plans

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, No. 1

Disruptive Innovation in Practice

A review of Michael B. Horn’s and Heather Staker’s “Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools”

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Getting 
Classroom 
Observations 
Right

Lessons on how from four pioneering districts

WINTER 2015 / VOL. 15, NO. 1

Teachers Unions and the Common Core

Standards inspire collaboration and dissent

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

A New Breed of Journalism

Education coverage is on the rise

WINTER 2015 / Vol. 15, No. 1

Blog Posts/Multimedia

Behind the Headline: Colorado Supreme Court Squashes Douglas County School Voucher Program

The Colorado Supreme Court ruled this morning that the voucher program in Douglas County violates the state’s Constitution.

06/29/2015

What We’re Watching: Why Proficiency Matters

The Foundation for Excellence in Education has launched Why Proficiency Matters, an interactive website that will help parents understand what proficiency means in their state and how it impacts their children.

06/29/2015

Summer School is Coming, Get Parents Involved

Parents who are given actionable feedback on how their kids are doing in summer school are more likely to talk with their kids and their kids are more likely to earn course credit.

06/29/2015

Behind the Headline: Study on Minorities in Special Education Proves Provocative

According to the conventional wisdom, minority students tend to be overrepresented in special ed because teachers are biased against them. Black students are 1.4 times more likely to be placed in special education than students of other races and ethnicities combined.

06/29/2015

What We’re Watching: Turnaround Districts — Lessons from Louisiana, Tennessee and Michigan

On June 29, Fordham hosted a discussion on turnaround school districts which included the leaders of these state-run districts in Louisiana, Tennessee, and Michigan.

06/26/2015

Reflections on an Extraordinary Decade of New Orleans School Reform

The story of New Orleans’ success entails two parts: a disaster that created room to reinvent a deeply troubled urban school system and an energetic commitment to seize that opportunity.

06/26/2015

Behind the Headline: What If Students Got Free College Tuition? Study Examines Kalamazoo Promise

A new study finds that the Kalamazoo Promise is boosting college enrollment and college success.

06/26/2015

Behind the Headline: Supreme Court Upholds Broad Discrimination Claims Under Housing Law

The Supreme Court ruled today that the Fair Housing Act (FHA) does allow “disparate impact” claims, in which plaintiffs only need to show that a particular practice has a disparate impact on a minority group and not evidence of discriminatory intent.

06/25/2015

Education Savings Account Wonk-A-Thon Recap

As Nevada implements its groundbreaking education savings account (ESA) program, policy wonks were asked to say what the state must get right.

06/25/2015

What We’re Watching: Campbell Brown Launches The Seventy Four

Former CNN anchor Campbell Brown is launching an education-focused website called The Seventy Four, named “for the 74 million children in America — the people the education establishment is supposed to serve.”

06/24/2015

The Key to Rigorous Online Assessments

Is it possible to integrate human-graded assessments into online learning software?

06/24/2015

What We’re Watching: The State of Entrepreneurship in K–12 Education

On June 24, 2015 AEI hosted a research conference on the current role of entrepreneurship in improving K-12 Education.

06/24/2015

Behind the Headline: Why Are American Schools Slowing Down So Many Bright Children?

Jay Mathews writes about a new report that describes ways of accelerating learning for gifted students and then describes barriers that school administrators and state legislators sometimes set up to block students who might do better in more challenging classes.

06/23/2015

Who Opts Out of State Tests?

District-level data from New York suggest that relatively affluent districts tend to have higher opt-out rates, and that districts with lower test scores have higher opt-out rates after taking socioeconomic status into account

06/23/2015

Behind the Headline: Cami Anderson, Picked by Christie, Is Out as Newark Schools Superintendent

On Top of the News Cami Anderson, Picked by Christie, Is Out as Newark Schools Superintendent 6/23/15 | New York Times Behind the Headline Newark’s Superintendent Rolls Up Her Sleeves and Gets To Work Winter 2013 | Education Next Cami Anderson, the superintendent of the Newark public school system since 2011, resigned on Monday. Anderson […]

06/23/2015

Big Impact: Supreme Court Housing Decision Could Have Significant Effect on Education

The education community should be watching to see how the Supreme Court rules on a housing case from Dallas which considers whether plaintiffs can bring “disparate impact” claims under the Fair Housing Act (FHA).

06/21/2015

Teacher Experience Levels Vary By State

Data suggest that some states should be investing much more heavily in teacher recruitment and retention efforts.

06/21/2015

Behind the Headline: The Outrageous Treatment Of One Of The Nation’s Most Outstanding Teachers

Rafe Esquith, a fifth grade teacher in Los Angeles, has become famous for helping his students, who come from low-income Hispanic and Korean families, put on a Shakespeare play every year.

06/21/2015

Behind the Headline: School Field Trips Go Virtual

In the Wall Street Journal, Caroline Porter describes the rise of the virtual field trip.

06/20/2015

Behind the Headline: Cover Story: Playdate

The cover of this week’s New Yorker shows two girls playing Minecraft on a playdate and in an article inside, Chris Ware describes what playing Miinecraft looks like to a parent of a 10-year-old girl.

06/19/2015

What We’re Watching: Who Invented the Common Core?

USA Today’s Greg Toppo answer’s a reader’s question about the origins of the Common Core State Standards.

06/19/2015

Behind the Headline: Share of Births to Unmarried Women Dips, Reversing a Long Trend

New data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control show that the overall birth rate in the U.S. went up last year but that the rate of unmarried women who gave birth declined.

06/18/2015

Using Video to Make Classroom Observations More Fair, More Helpful, and Less Burdensome

The use of teacher-collected video in classroom observations did seem to improve the classroom observation process.

06/18/2015

What We’re Watching: The Knowledge of Capital Nations

Eric Hanushek discusses the value of raising students’ cognitive skills and how this is crucial to boosting long-term economic growth

06/18/2015

Behind the Headline: A Vision For Teacher Training At MIT: West Point Meets Bell Labs

Arthur Levine, the former president of Teachers College, will partner with MIT to create a new kind of teacher training program, funded by $30 million from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

06/17/2015

The Character Assessment Initiative (Charassein)

A new initiative aims to define, develop, and validate measures of what have often been called non-cognitive skills, but we think are more accurately described as character traits.

06/17/2015

Illinois Pension Reform Law Unconstitutional. What’s Next?

Court tells the state it can’t cut benefits for existing workers, so new and future workers will have to bear the full brunt of cuts.

06/17/2015

Behind the Headline: How Effective Are Online Credit Recovery Programs?

“Despite the rising presence of online credit recovery programs, there exists scant evidence as to their effectiveness in increasing high school graduation rates, or their impact on other outcomes of interest,” notes Ly Le on the blog of the Albert Shanker Institute.

06/16/2015

What We’re Watching: The New TNTP: A Conversation with Daniel Weisberg

The Fordham Institute hosted a live-streamed conversation with Daniel Weisberg, the new CEO of TNTP.

06/16/2015

A Peek Inside the Classroom Black Box

Why is so little information available about which textbooks and curricula are being used?

06/16/2015

Behind the Headline: When Guarding Student Data Endangers Valuable Research

On the Upshot, Susan Dynarski explores the tension between protecting the privacy of student data and using large data sets to determine what is working in schools.

06/15/2015

Want More College Graduates? Improve Our K–12 System

We have already closed the gap between college readiness and college attainment.

06/15/2015

The Grey Lady’s School Choice Confusion

Arguments made in a New York Times editorial against Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s tax credit proposal do not withstand scrutiny.

06/15/2015

Behind the Headline: Hess, Straight Up

Ed Next’s Rick Hess is profiled in the Summer issue of Harvard Ed. Magazine.

06/15/2015

Not All Pensions Are Equal

For most teachers, a pension won’t lead to a cushy retirement.

06/12/2015

How Schools Can Solve Robert Putnam’s Poverty Paradox

The way to help poor children climb the ladder to the middle class and achieve the American Dream must involve rebuilding social capital.

06/12/2015

What We’re Watching: Getting Education Bills to the Finish Line

The Brown Center hosted a panel to discuss why it has been so hard for Congress to reauthorize ESEA.

06/12/2015

Behind the Headline: A Charter-City Deal That Doesn’t Really Help Kids

Instead of trying to come up with an unsatisfying compromise between pro- and anti-charter forces, legislators in New York should really be working to broker a compact between charter schools and the school district like the one Denver has. So argues Richard Whitmire in today’s New York Daily News.

06/11/2015

What We’re Watching: Universal Basic Skills: What Countries Stand to Gain

Eric Hanushek talks about the economic growth that would result if countries could meet the goal of bringing all children up to a level of basic skills.

06/10/2015
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