What’s Next on ESEA?

Today’s 22-0 vote from the Senate HELP committee on ESEA reauthorization is an amazing tribute to the bipartisan leadership of Chairman Lamar Alexander and ranking member Patty Murray.

Debunking a Misleading Report on School Choice

The Center for Tax and Budget Accountability released a misleading report on school choice programs in Indiana and elsewhere

A Response to “Breaking the Mold”

Mike Kirst’s review of our book, A Democratic Constitution for Public Education, is insightful and constructive and raises important questions about how our proposal would work in practice.

Behind the Headline: This Viral Math Problem Shows What American Schools Could Learn From Singapore

“A headache-inducing logic problem from Singapore’s Math Olympiad went viral this week, sparking online debates, a Twitter hashtag, and even a song that mimics the process of elimination that leads to the correct answer,” notes Libby Nelson in Vox.

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The Great Achievements of the Every Child Achieves Act

The bipartisan ESEA reauthorization bill crafted by Senators Alexander and Murray represents a very smart compromise on the key issue of accountability

Opt-Out Movement Likely Inconsequential for Teacher Evaluations

In the majority of classrooms, where opt-out appears likely to remain at low levels, the data strongly suggest that students sitting out of standardized testing will have only a trivial impact on the ratings received by their teachers.

Behind the Headline: Fixing Failing Schools

The state of Massachusetts is poised to take over the schools in Holyoke, after taking over the schools in Lawrence four years ago.

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Patty Murray and the Return of Wishful Thinking

The bipartisan bill to update the No Child Left Behind Act requires states to pledge that they will get all of their students to college or career readiness, and build those expectations into their accountability systems.

Behind the Headline: Is Education Technology Where Women Are Starting To Buck The Tech World’s Sexist Trends?

“In the geeky boys’ club of tech, education tech may be one of the few slightly more bright spots where female founders and CEOs are showing up—and staying the course—in greater numbers,” writes Tony Wan in Fast Company.

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Bravo

The Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, unveiled a few days back by Senators Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray and scheduled for HELP Committee mark-up on April 14, is a remarkable piece of work.

Alexander-Murray: This Is What Compromise Looks Like, in a Single Table

The language in the Alexander-Murray compromise is much less prescriptive than No Child Left Behind’s “adequate yearly progress” concoction, but it’s fairly prescriptive nonetheless.

Behind the Headline: Study of Black and Latino Boys Excludes Charter Success

When the Boston Public Schools commissioned a study to identify schools that are helping black and Latino boys close the achievement gap, they were unable to find any traditional district schools where black and Latino boys were achieving at levels that matched or exceeded state averages, writes Michael Jonas in Commonwealth magazine.

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Creativity, Cartels, and the Supply Side of Choice-Based Reform

Both the pro- and the anti-school choice crowds tend to ignore what should be the central issue when it comes to markets, which is their immense creative potential and the way they can shatter comfortable cartels.

College Preparedness Over the Years, According to NAEP

The proportion of recent high school graduates attending college is far higher than the proportion of twelfth graders who are prepared for college—and that gap has worsened over time.

Behind the Headline: Schools of Education Just Keep Fighting Change

In RealClear Education, Kate Walsh analyzes the battle between schools of education and their accreditors over efforts to raise standards and hold ed schools accountable.

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Behind the Headline: Sens. Alexander, Murray Propose Bipartisan Measure to Replace NCLB

Senate leaders have released a bipartisan proposal to replace NCLB which would give states more leeway when it comes to setting academic standards, evaluating teachers, and deciding what to do about low-performing schools. The law would continue to require annual testing.

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Behind the Headline: Shut Down Bad Charter Schools

In USA Today, Richard Whitmire argues that charter authorizers need to be more aggressive about shutting down poorly performing charter schools.

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President Obama and the Politics of Pensions

As evidence mounts showing how poorly structured pension plans fail to meet the needs of today’s workforce, let’s hope more politicians make it a trend.

Campbell’s Law, Cheating, and Atlanta’s NAEP Score Gains

Although 11 educators were convicted of cheating on state tests, the city made remarkable improvements on low-stakes measures of educational progress such as NAEP.

Behind the Headline: The War on Poverty: Was It Lost?

In the latest issue of the New York Review of Books, Christopher Jencks reviews Legacies of the War on Poverty and explains why there is disagreement over the impact of the War on Poverty and why it is so difficult to measure changes in the poverty rate over time.

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Choice, Accountability, and Charter Performance

If you’re at all interested in school choice, you really should read a trio of recent reports.

A Troubling Verdict

I found myself caught up short by the Atlanta verdict this week and eleven educators found guilty of racketeering in a widespread cheating scandal.

Behind the Headline: Charter Schools Still a D.C. Hot-Button Issue

In Washington, D.C., the percentage of students enrolled in charter schools has grown every year for almost 20 years, but this year, enrollment has leveled off at 44 percent, notes Michael Allison Chandler.

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Behind the Headline: There’s a Big Hole in How Teachers Build Skills, and Pinterest Is Helping Fill It

For many teachers, Pinterest has become a valuable place to find creative lesson plans, classroom decorations, and teaching tips, notes Madeleine Cummings in Slate.

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Why Can’t Politicians Get Out of Schooling?

The reason education policy today feels more invasive is because policymakers have been convinced that the old rules and regulations weren’t getting the job done.

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Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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