College Needs a Rethink

Higher education today gives analysts, policymakers, and critics so much to fret about that we haven’t been paying nearly enough heed to the quality and value of the product itself.

Why the Education Status Quo Cannibalizes New Ideas — and What to Do About It

Disruptive innovation theory suggests that processes that dominated the past can wreak havoc on best-laid plans.

Without the Right Curriculum, Personalized Learning Is Just Another Fad

Personalizing learning will be most powerful when it is coupled with intentional, coherent and rigorous instruction.

In the News: A Student Loan Nightmare — The Teacher in the Wrong Payment Plan

Welcome to the world of student loans and debt forgiveness for teachers, a patchwork of overlapping programs, contradictory regulations, and expensive subsidies.

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Online Schooling: Who Is Harmed and Who Is Helped?

A review of studies that measure the causal impact of online courses.

The New Gates Strategy: Evolution, Not Revolution (For Better and For Worse)

We can and should seek every possible opportunity to help schools improve, but we also need to keep up the pressure on the system.

A Few More Questions for the National History Teacher of the Year

Sara Ziemnik answers some practical questions from teachers about how she teaches history.

Top Charter Networks Turning Attention to Curriculum

Rather than viewing curricular uniformity as a straightjacket, KIPP decided to build a coherent curriculum as a resource for its teachers.

In the News: Gates Foundation Announces New $1.7B for K-12

Last week, Bill Gates delivered a speech in which he described some new priorities for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

Today’s frenzied enthusiasm for computer-assisted “personalized learning” could lead us to charge into some all-too-predictable pitfalls.

Will Tax Reform Provide More Support for Children and Their Families? Follow the Money

Plans for federal tax cuts and reforms need to be fleshed out in ways that provide greater benefits for children in families most in need.

In the News: Expert Advice on Schools Is a New Kind of Employee Perk

In New Orleans, a nonprofit called EdNavigator helps low-income parents support and advocate for their children at school. EdNavigator’s services are paid for by employers who then offer them to their employees as a free benefit.

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Straight Up Conversation: 2017 National History Teacher of the Year Sara Ziemnik

A chat with Sara Ziemnik about teaching history and how to nurture open and respectful debate in an era of polarization and general nastiness.

In the News: How Teach for America Lost Its Way

In Commentary, Sohrab Ahmari makes the case that Teach for America, once a leading light of the education reform movement, has now transformed itself into an arm of the progressive movement.

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5 School-Improvement Tips for Civic and Community Leaders

In many places, perhaps the most important mission for civic leaders is to provide the persistence, patience, and maturity that can help turn a vicious cycle into a virtuous one.

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Changing Support for Charter Schools Among Republicans

Why has support for the schools declined and what could turn that around?

In the News: Eli Broad, Giant of Education Philanthropy, is Retiring

Last week, Eli Broad announced that he would be retiring from his work at the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation in order to spend more time with his family.

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The Pell Grant Proxy: A Ubiquitous But Flawed Measure of Low-income Student Enrollment

Policymakers use the Pell Grant program to measure the share of low-income students enrolled at specific universities, but the reliability of this measure is rarely scrutinized.

About That ‘White Supremacist’ Bedsheet Which Greeted Betsy DeVos’ Speech at Harvard

Today, let’s set aside the Beltway stuff to talk a bit about that sign and what lately strikes me as the remarkably promiscuous use of that term—white supremacist—in education circles.

Has Eva Moskowitz Gone Too Far on Parent Accountability?

Success Academy Schools have begun sending home “Parent Investment Cards” evaluating how well parents are meeting their responsibilities.

In the News: ‘Open’ Curricula Offerings Expand to Social Studies

The Core Knowledge Foundation has released a free online social studies curriculum for grades 3 to 5.

Education Philanthropists Should Walk the Walk on Accountability

The other week, I called out teachers unions for failing to “walk the walk”; I think the same admonition can be applied to education funders, big time.

What We Know About Career and Technical Education in High School

States have been very active in passing laws about CTE. They now need to step up and support research that can help ensure these new initiatives are successful.

No, Half of American Schoolchildren Are Not ‘Low-Income’

It might be the most common mistake in education writing today: declaring that a majority of public school students hail from “low income” families.

In the News: Turning “STEM” into “STEAM” Is Counterproductive to Protecting Arts Education

Jay Greene argues that supporters of arts education are making a mistake when they try to sell the idea of integrating arts education into the study of science, technology, engineering and math.

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