35 Years Ago This Month, the National Commission on Excellence in Education Released “A Nation at Risk: The Imperative for Educational Reform”

Reflecting on the “35 pages that shook the US education world [and became] one of the most significant documents in the history of American public education.”

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year

Georgia Tech’s online program is the largest computer-science master’s degree program in the United States—and possibly the world.

Which Urban School Districts Have Been Moving in the Right Direction on NAEP?

These will be the school districts to watch when the newest NAEP scores are released in early April.

Rethinking School Discipline

Black students who have a same-race teacher are less likely to experience exclusionary discipline.

In the News: Apple Tries to Regain Education Market Share With iPad Changes

One day before the Apple announcement, Google announced the release of a new tablet for schools that will cost the same amount as Apple’s new iPad, $329

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EdStat: Between 2011 and 2015, Math Scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress Declined in 20 States

What changes will be revealed on April 10 when the 2017 NAEP results are released?

State ESSA Plans May Use Federal Funds to Start New Charter Schools

Texas districts can use Title I resources to start new schools rather than just work to turn around low-performing ones.

Unpacking Teacher Shortages

States should work with teacher prep programs to produce candidates that are more aligned to their needs.

What Standards Should Students Meet to Graduate from High School?

Twenty three education policy wonks (or teams of wonks) answered this question as part of Fordham’s 2018 Wonkathon

EdStat: Only 54 Percent of School Principals Rate Their Teachers’ Understanding of How Children Learn as “Moderately” or “Very” Good

Though teachers are required to learn some basic principles of psychology as part of their training, many report that their education is too theoretical.

Teacher Preparation and the Diversity-Validity Dilemma

We are facing some real challenges in obtaining the high-quality, diverse teacher workforce that we need.

The Rebound in Charter Support — But Also a Widening Partisan Divide

Charters are making a rebound—at least among Republicans and African Americans.

In 2015, 14 Percent of U.S. College Students Were Enrolled in Online-Only Programs

Who takes online classes? Does online education simply substitute for in-person education or does it serve students who would not otherwise enroll in an educational program?

A New “Report” Misleads on School Vouchers

Newspeak plays a central role in the latest Center for American Progress (CAP) broadside against the idea of low-income parents choosing private schools for their children .

EdStat: West Virginia Teachers Secured a 5 Percent Pay Raise by Striking

Maybe we need to rethink how teachers’ pay schedules are structured.

How Life Outside of School Affects Student Performance in School

Approximately 18 percent of Michigan third graders have been formally investigated by Child Protective Services for possible exposure to abuse or neglect.

EdStat: Only 36 Percent of the Public Think the Federal Government Should Play the Largest Role in Setting Educational Standards

Opinion has shifted modestly away from federal control toward local control over the past two years.

Which States Are on a Hot Streak Coming Into the 2017 NAEP Release?

The District of Columbia, Indiana, and Tennessee clearly have momentum going into the 2017 NAEP release, with the broadest gains in both subjects and grade levels

When Results Aren’t Enough: The Financial State of Urban Catholic Schools

If we want to preserve urban Catholic education, we need savvy fiscal experts and business leaders who can help build sustainable institutions in a fiercely competitive environment.

In the News: Extensive Data Shows Punishing Reach of Racism for Black Boys

A new study led by researchers from Stanford, Harvard, and the Census Bureau, finds that white boys who grow up rich are likely to remain that way. Black boys raised at the top, however, are more likely to become poor than to stay wealthy in their own adult households.

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EdStat: The West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Lasted 9 Days

Could labor activism mean that unions are getting weaker?

Remembering “A Nation At Risk”: Reflections on Politics and Policy

Standards-based reforms, choice-based reforms, and an expanded NAEP came to dominate education reform discussions in the report’s wake.

In the News: I’d Be an ‘A’ Student if I Could Just Read My Notes

When college professors ban laptops, students complain about hand cramps and an inability to read their own handwritten notes.

EdStat: Children Whose Parents Receive Public Assistance Hear Less Than One Third of the Words Encountered by Higher-Income Peers by Age 3

The children of highly educated parents are capable of more complex speech and have more extensive vocabularies before they even start school.

Do Strikes Signal Union Strength?

Power and the West Virginia teachers’ strike

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