Bravo

The Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, unveiled a few days back by Senators Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray and scheduled for HELP Committee mark-up on April 14, is a remarkable piece of work.

Alexander-Murray: This Is What Compromise Looks Like, in a Single Table

The language in the Alexander-Murray compromise is much less prescriptive than No Child Left Behind’s “adequate yearly progress” concoction, but it’s fairly prescriptive nonetheless.

Behind the Headline: Study of Black and Latino Boys Excludes Charter Success

When the Boston Public Schools commissioned a study to identify schools that are helping black and Latino boys close the achievement gap, they were unable to find any traditional district schools where black and Latino boys were achieving at levels that matched or exceeded state averages, writes Michael Jonas in Commonwealth magazine.

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Creativity, Cartels, and the Supply Side of Choice-Based Reform

Both the pro- and the anti-school choice crowds tend to ignore what should be the central issue when it comes to markets, which is their immense creative potential and the way they can shatter comfortable cartels.

College Preparedness Over the Years, According to NAEP

The proportion of recent high school graduates attending college is far higher than the proportion of twelfth graders who are prepared for college—and that gap has worsened over time.

Behind the Headline: Schools of Education Just Keep Fighting Change

In RealClear Education, Kate Walsh analyzes the battle between schools of education and their accreditors over efforts to raise standards and hold ed schools accountable.

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Behind the Headline: Sens. Alexander, Murray Propose Bipartisan Measure to Replace NCLB

Senate leaders have released a bipartisan proposal to replace NCLB which would give states more leeway when it comes to setting academic standards, evaluating teachers, and deciding what to do about low-performing schools. The law would continue to require annual testing.

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Behind the Headline: Shut Down Bad Charter Schools

In USA Today, Richard Whitmire argues that charter authorizers need to be more aggressive about shutting down poorly performing charter schools.

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President Obama and the Politics of Pensions

As evidence mounts showing how poorly structured pension plans fail to meet the needs of today’s workforce, let’s hope more politicians make it a trend.

Campbell’s Law, Cheating, and Atlanta’s NAEP Score Gains

Although 11 educators were convicted of cheating on state tests, the city made remarkable improvements on low-stakes measures of educational progress such as NAEP.

Behind the Headline: The War on Poverty: Was It Lost?

In the latest issue of the New York Review of Books, Christopher Jencks reviews Legacies of the War on Poverty and explains why there is disagreement over the impact of the War on Poverty and why it is so difficult to measure changes in the poverty rate over time.

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Choice, Accountability, and Charter Performance

If you’re at all interested in school choice, you really should read a trio of recent reports.

A Troubling Verdict

I found myself caught up short by the Atlanta verdict this week and eleven educators found guilty of racketeering in a widespread cheating scandal.

Behind the Headline: Charter Schools Still a D.C. Hot-Button Issue

In Washington, D.C., the percentage of students enrolled in charter schools has grown every year for almost 20 years, but this year, enrollment has leveled off at 44 percent, notes Michael Allison Chandler.

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Behind the Headline: There’s a Big Hole in How Teachers Build Skills, and Pinterest Is Helping Fill It

For many teachers, Pinterest has become a valuable place to find creative lesson plans, classroom decorations, and teaching tips, notes Madeleine Cummings in Slate.

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Why Can’t Politicians Get Out of Schooling?

The reason education policy today feels more invasive is because policymakers have been convinced that the old rules and regulations weren’t getting the job done.

Behind the Headline: Turning Schools Into Fight Clubs

In the Wall St. Journal, Eva Moskowitz warns that many across the country are engaging in a misguided campaign to diminish the school discipline needed to ensure a nurturing and productive learning environment.

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Behind the Headline: Common Core Is Unpopular In Louisiana When You Call It Common Core, LSU Survey Finds

In Louisiana, where Gov. Bobby Jindal wants the state legislature to drop the Common Core state standards in its upcoming legislative session, a survey finds high support for “generic” academic standards but lower support for the Common Core standards.

Time For a New Non-District Charter Authorizer in D.C.

Washington, D.C. could offer America’s cities an invaluable new example of an all-charter approach.

The Gender Gap in Reading

The gender gap is large, worldwide, and persistent through the K-12 years. What should be done about it? Maybe nothing.

The Death of the Think Tank, R.I.P.

Think tanks have chosen to focus almost exclusively on advocacy efforts, not realizing that effective advocacy requires generating new, high-quality information.

The Complications of Educational Returns in Rural America

Idaho finds itself in a chicken-egg situation. Improve educational attainment without improved employment opportunities inside Idaho and the state might risk investing in a strategy that merely exports talented young Idahoans.

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Behind the Headline: Do Snow Days Hurt Student Progress? A Harvard Professor Says No.

In the Washington Post, Emma Brown describes the findings of a new study by Joshua Goodman on the impact of snow days on student achievement.

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Not Meeting Standards: A Warning Light, Not A Death Sentence

Here’s what the Common Core is designed to communicate: If your children are meeting the standards, it means they are believed to be on track for college and career readiness by the end of high school

New Systems of Schools and Common Enrollment

If cities simply add more choice schools in the absence of changes to the enrollment process, parents can struggle to find information on schools, be forced to fill out widely varying school applications, and then receive a staggered barrage of acceptance and rejection notices.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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