“Deans for Impact” Group Aims to Reform Ed Schools From Within

Two dozen deans of education schools have come together to embrace empirical validation of teacher preparation methods and accountability for student learning.

Is It Really Possible That Professional Development Doesn’t Work?

What TNTP’s report “The Mirage” gets wrong on teacher development

Is It Really Possible That Professional Development Doesn’t Work? A Response to Andy Smarick

The root of the problem is our collective failure to even try to measure the impact professional development has on teacher performance in the first place.

Does Regulation Improve the Political Prospects for Choice?

High-regulation of school choice comes with a cost to quality.

Breaking Apart the Silos of Education Research, Policy, and Practice

Those who work in education research, policy, and practice frequently fail to communicate with one another, and when they do, each faction speaks a different language.

Does Regulation Protect Kids and Improve Outcomes from Choice?

In their desire to protect disadvantaged students, the backers of a heavy-regulation approach have ironically done serious harm to these students by driving away most of the supply

The True Teacher-Experience Premium

How to make compensation more fair for more teachers

Backloading teachers’ pensions substantially increases the compensation of experienced teachers relative to younger teachers.

Do State Funds Require Accountability to the State for Performance?

Why do most government programs not require accountability for performance? Because we trust that the interests of participants are aligned with the public interest in providing them with the benefit.

No, the Sky is Not Falling: Interpreting the Latest SAT Scores

The SAT is not designed to measure national achievement; the score losses from 2014 were miniscule; and most of the declines are probably the result of demographic changes in the SAT population.

Why Did President Obama Appoint John King as “Acting” Education Secretary Rather Than Put Him Through the Senate Confirmation Process?

As Arne Duncan exits, another missed opportunity for bipartisanship

The High-Regulation Approach to School Choice

My fear is that just when school choice is achieving escape velocity as a self-sustaining and expanding policy, the love for high-regulation may do serious harm to these programs and the children they intend to help.

Schooling Isn’t Learning, the Rewards to Better Schools Are Enormous, and Other Observations from Eric Hanushek

An interview about accountability, attainment, and more

A Shocking College-Readiness Gap in the Suburbs

Montgomery County is getting just 11 percent of its low-income students to the college-ready level, and fewer than one in five of its minority students.

Actually, Boehner’s Resignation Doesn’t Change the Odds on ESEA

The odds of ESEA reauthorization weren’t good before Boehner’s announcement. After Boehner’s announcement, not a lot has changed.

Sorry, Folks, ESEA Reauthorization Just Got Much Harder

Some folks are claiming that news that House Speaker John Boehner will step down at the end of October makes an ESEA reauthorization more likely this fall. That’s just crazy talk.

In New York City, Mayor Bill De Blasio’s Initiatives Threaten to Widen the Achievement Gap

Mayor de Blasio has shown a good instinct for identifying the right targets—early childhood education and reading. But it’s hard to be encouraged that either he or his chancellor knows how to hit them.

NYT on Education and the Sharing Economy

Words like “market,” “competition,” and “profit” are considered dirty words in some education circles. Will websites that allow teachers to buy and sell lesson plans change the minds of some teachers?

The Real Battle for Common Core Begins

An examination of assignments given by middle school teachers appears to show that most of the work asked of students does not reflect the higher, more rigorous standards set by Common Core.

Correcting Misinformation on School Choice

Yet another author ignores the ample evidence available that school choice provides benefits for children.

Would Pension Plans Be Fine If They Were (Magically) Fully Funded?

Teachers suffer from low salaries while they work in exchange for the promise of better retirement savings when they leave, but for most teachers, that promise never becomes a reality.

More Than A Slogan

Five good reasons federalism is so important in education

On Constitution Day, in Search of the Public Mission of Schools

Today is Constitution Day, when all schools receiving federal funds are expected to provide lessons or other programming on our most important founding document.

Politicians Couldn’t Agree on a “Common” Yardstick for Schools. Statisticians Created One Anyway.

SchoolGrades uses the results of state tests to create a comparable, A-F grading system for all public elementary and middle schools in the U.S.

The Common Core Test Wake-Up Call Is Here

Parents will soon receive for the first time their children’s scores on new tests aligned to the standards. The news is expected to be sobering.

How Independent Schools Can Ward Off Disruption

Micro-schools have the potential to transform the independent schooling landscape—and threaten existing independent schools in the process

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform