Does Attending a Specialized High School Make a Difference?

No, at least according to a recent study. But as a New York City mom of a son in a specialized high school, I see enormous benefits.

By Guest blogger    Blog, Editorial  

How States Should Redesign Their Accountability Systems Under ESSA

States are now putting pen to paper on their accountability plans and many of them want advice about what to do.

Filling the Dozen Top Jobs in Trump’s Department of Education

Here are some of the names I’d love to see considered for a dozen of the top jobs.

A Silver Lining for Online Higher Education?

While the overall picture regarding online higher education is mixed, some new papers present some cause for optimism, especially if we can figure out ways to successfully monitor and certify the quality of online education.

Education Policy Under Donald Trump

What will education policy look like under a Trump administration? Education Next editors and contributors offer their thoughts.

Pence, Trump, and the Ed Reform Agenda

With Donald Trump set to enter the Oval Office, Vice President-elect Michael Pence seems likely to shape the federal role in education for the next four years.

Look to Congress, not Trump, for Leadership on Education Policy

An assertive Congress ignoring or even steamrolling a weak, incompetent White House seems like a plausible outcome in 2017.

How Will a Trump Presidency Impact Education Innovation?

A relative lack of activity from the federal government could create uncertainty, paralysis, or an opportunity for local educators to innovate.

Now What?

What does this political earthquake mean for education policy?

Trump Happened

What does this mean for education? We’ll have to see who gets named to key policy positions in the White House and the Department of Education.

Are Teacher Turnover Rates Rising? Maybe Not

We may just be employing more teachers who fall into career stages with high turnover.

Mastery, Expertise, and the Limits of Experts

Many people who get presented as experts in education policy are not really “experts” in any substantive sense.

Should Policymakers Make College Free or Better Support Institutions?

Providing the right mix of financial aid and non-financial supports to the students who need them most is a better idea than eliminating tuition for all or most families.

Evidence for the Disconnect Between Changing Test Scores and Changing Later Life Outcomes

Over-relying on test scores and declaring with confidence that we know what works and what doesn’t can lead to big policy mistakes.

The Massachusetts Charter School Cap Harms Disadvantaged Students

When the need is so great, the demand so strong, and the supply so skimpy, why not allow more charter schools to serve more children?

When Cultivating Expertise, Here’s How Technology Can Help

The areas of practice, demonstration, and feedback are where technology really supports learning.

Cristo Rey Schools Build Social Capital for Students — and Financial Stability for Schools

Students are able to pay up to 70 percent of their own tuition at a Catholic school by working one full day per week at a job in a professional setting arranged by their school.

Trains, Planes, and ESAs

As with rail, what began as an effort to regulate and make universal elementary education eventually translated into attempts to block competitors to the government funded model.

Religion and Student Motivation

Priming students to think about religion increases students’ willingness to delay gratification as well as their political tolerance.

The False Dichotomy Between Memorization and Conceptual Understanding

Experts tend to forget just how much they’ve absorbed into long-term memory, so when they train novices, they tend to leave out a large amount of important information.

The Effect of Charter Schools on Students in Traditional Public Schools: A Review of the Evidence

Eleven studies have examined whether charter schools will have positive or negative indirect effects on students in district public schools.

A Broader View of OER: In Response to McShane’s Article on Open Education

Open education is a crucial means to organize and transform the work of faculty, teachers, librarians, independent scholars and learners.

Don’t Know or Don’t Care?

Around one third of the variation in PISA test performance across countries can be explained by how much effort students are willing to exert rather than what they know

Going to School is Optional: Schools Need to Engage Students to Increase Their Lifetime Opportunities

Missing school and skipping class has consequences for student learning. Luckily we have policy levers to keep students in school and in class.

Inputs Do Not Guarantee Outcomes: Getting Online Credit Recovery Right

It is a mistake to demand that online credit-recovery courses require the same time and effort as regular courses.

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