A Book Club For Boys Who Hate Reading

For many boys, the idea that reading can be fun seems a cruel fiction. So my friend and I decided, for our sons’ sake, to change that.

A Surprisingly Good Year for Education Reform

We can’t let down our guard, nor can we ignore the many other problems facing our country, but we can enjoy some satisfaction in the fact that child-friendly education policies are still winning.

College Needs a Rethink

Higher education today gives analysts, policymakers, and critics so much to fret about that we haven’t been paying nearly enough heed to the quality and value of the product itself.

Why the Education Status Quo Cannibalizes New Ideas — and What to Do About It

Disruptive innovation theory suggests that processes that dominated the past can wreak havoc on best-laid plans.

Without the Right Curriculum, Personalized Learning Is Just Another Fad

Personalizing learning will be most powerful when it is coupled with intentional, coherent and rigorous instruction.

Partisanship and Higher Education: Where Republicans and Democrats Agree

In our most recent public-opinion survey, we find sharp differences between Democrats and Republicans about the value of a bachelor’s degree (as distinct from a two-year associate’s degree).

Online Schooling: Who Is Harmed and Who Is Helped?

A review of studies that measure the causal impact of online courses.

The New Gates Strategy: Evolution, Not Revolution (For Better and For Worse)

We can and should seek every possible opportunity to help schools improve, but we also need to keep up the pressure on the system.

A Few More Questions for the National History Teacher of the Year

Sara Ziemnik answers some practical questions from teachers about how she teaches history.

Top Charter Networks Turning Attention to Curriculum

Rather than viewing curricular uniformity as a straightjacket, KIPP decided to build a coherent curriculum as a resource for its teachers.

When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

Today’s frenzied enthusiasm for computer-assisted “personalized learning” could lead us to charge into some all-too-predictable pitfalls.

Will Tax Reform Provide More Support for Children and Their Families? Follow the Money

Plans for federal tax cuts and reforms need to be fleshed out in ways that provide greater benefits for children in families most in need.

Straight Up Conversation: 2017 National History Teacher of the Year Sara Ziemnik

A chat with Sara Ziemnik about teaching history and how to nurture open and respectful debate in an era of polarization and general nastiness.

Changing Support for Charter Schools Among Republicans

Why has support for the schools declined and what could turn that around?

The Pell Grant Proxy: A Ubiquitous But Flawed Measure of Low-income Student Enrollment

Policymakers use the Pell Grant program to measure the share of low-income students enrolled at specific universities, but the reliability of this measure is rarely scrutinized.

About That ‘White Supremacist’ Bedsheet Which Greeted Betsy DeVos’ Speech at Harvard

Today, let’s set aside the Beltway stuff to talk a bit about that sign and what lately strikes me as the remarkably promiscuous use of that term—white supremacist—in education circles.

Has Eva Moskowitz Gone Too Far on Parent Accountability?

Success Academy Schools have begun sending home “Parent Investment Cards” evaluating how well parents are meeting their responsibilities.

Education Philanthropists Should Walk the Walk on Accountability

The other week, I called out teachers unions for failing to “walk the walk”; I think the same admonition can be applied to education funders, big time.

What We Know About Career and Technical Education in High School

States have been very active in passing laws about CTE. They now need to step up and support research that can help ensure these new initiatives are successful.

No, Half of American Schoolchildren Are Not ‘Low-Income’

It might be the most common mistake in education writing today: declaring that a majority of public school students hail from “low income” families.

Lynchpin of Teachers Union Power Returns to the Supreme Court

If the Court rules against agency fees it would cause teachers unions’ membership to shrink and the unions’ political and economic wings to be clipped.

Advice to the Arnold Foundation

The problem with Portfolio Management is the centralized and overly-active nature of a single quality-control entity.

An Innovation That Looks Good Even Up Close

The 21st Century Charter School in Gary, Indiana is an example of a school that does “dual enrollment” right.

Secretary DeVos’ Harvard Speech on School Choice

DeVos delivered a strong speech, articulating points that aren’t made often or forcefully enough.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

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