D.C.’s Outstanding and Improving Charter School Sector

Test scores in D.C. offer reason to believe that chartering—if done smartly—can replace the district system for delivering public education in America’s cities.

Education Innovation: Lessons from Latin America

Perhaps the most surprising recent phenomenon in Latin America has been the extent to which entrepreneurs, companies, and investors, are getting involved in education.

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Editorial, International  

Cami Anderson and the Forces of Unreason

Newark superintendent Cami Anderson came to AEI to give a talk, but the talk had to be relocated and the logistics modified because a busload of Anderson critics pledging to disrupt the event followed her from Newark.

Do Teachers Support the Vergara Decision?

Courts have yet to reach a final verdict on teacher tenure and seniority rights, but the court of public opinion has already made a clear determination.

New Waiver Guidance Will Sink Schools Where All Boats Are Rising

Because there are achievement gaps at Sawgrass Elementary School, the folks in Washington don’t think this school deserves an A.

Teachers’ Unions Support Local Collective Bargaining…Except When it Comes to Their Pensions

Teachers might prefer a different arrangement than current state pension plans, but they don’t really have a voice in those decisions.

Mixed Results for Arizona’s Charter Schools

Charter schools vary more in their impact on student performance on state tests than traditional public schools; there are more charters with very large positive or very large negative test-score impacts than there are traditional public schools with such extreme outcomes.

A Response to Carol Burris and Rick Hess on Common Core Math in the Elementary Grades

Common Core has the potential to shift and drastically improve math instruction in American schools,

How a Portfolio District Differs from a School District: A Response to Jay Greene

Plus what it would really mean to let the market work itself out

The Teacher Equity Problem Is Real. The Proposed Solutions Are Not.

If teachers are the most-important in-school factor for student growth, we certainly don’t act like it.

How is a Portfolio District Different from a School District?

If you want to create real change, you have to change the system of incentives — not just create new institutions that will be governed by the same perverse incentives.

What’s Next for Detroit’s Troubled Schools?

What the city needs is a portfolio manager for its schools.

Do Value-Added Estimates Identify Causal Effects of Teachers and Schools?

There is now substantial evidence that value-added estimates capture important information about the causal effects of teachers and schools

Ten Facts About What the Candidates Are Saying on Education

What candidates running for governor and the U.S. Senate have to say on K-12, higher ed, and pre-K.

Do States Really Need an Education Technology Plan?

Simply having a technology plan may not be a meaningful proxy for a clear blended learning strategy or support system.

Why Do Americans Rate Their Local Public Schools So Favorably?

Americans assign far higher grades to the public schools in their local community than to the public schools of the nation as a whole.

Arne Duncan’s Office of Civil Rights: Six Years of Meddling

There’s been no problem too big or too small for Arne Duncan’s Department of Education to tackle. His Office of Civil Rights has been a prime example of executive overreach and federal interference run amok.

Colorado’s Unreal Teacher Retirement Plan

Teachers are forced to forego their own retirement savings in order to pay down a debt accrued over many years. It harms their future retirement security and, by forcing districts into painful budget decisions, it harms the quality of education delivered to Colorado’s students.

Narrowing Education

Not every student will benefit from music, theater, or sports, and very few of them will go on to careers in music, acting, or sports, but those of us who support a broad education recognize that all of these activities have important benefits for many students and should be part of schools.

Is Uncle Sam Ed Reform’s Biggest Liability?

Many of today’s most prominent reforms are quite popular, but it looks like folks are perturbed by a meddlesome Uncle Sam

Teachers Would Prefer Cash

A common perception about how we pay public sector workers is fundamentally flawed.

The Twenty-Five Richest Elementary Schools in the Richest Region of the Country

At one elementary school, the average income is almost $250,000 per year. Is this school really more “public” than an inner-city Catholic school serving poor minority children? The public spends $12,000 per child on the former and $0 per child on the latter. Tell me again why that’s fair?

What the 2014 Senate Elections Might Mean for Education

If the Republicans take the Senate, Senator Lamar Alexander would take the helm of the Senate HELP Committee, which is a big deal.

A Bad Idea Whose Time Has Come

Before we retreat to the pre-NCLB era of grade-span testing or revert to some other testing-light position, let’s at least recall some of the benefits of annual testing of all kids.

What’s Right About Common Core

The overheated rhetoric around Common Core elides the fact that it incorporates several fundamentally sound and long-overdue ideas that have gone missing from our schools for decades.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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