What “The Cage-Busting Teacher” Means For School Reformers

Four ways for policymakers and reformers to create the conditions whereby cage-busting teachers can thrive

The Best Part of NCLB Reauthorization You’ve Never Heard Of

The larger legacy of the Every Child Achieves Act may well be how it cleans up supplement not supplant, a little discussed and often misunderstood fiscal rule

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Editorial, No Child Left Behind  

Schools Can’t Innovate Until Districts Do

Districts are currently unwittingly hostile to school-level innovation. For that to change, they must aggressively work to change the incentives, policies, and structures so that they encourage and free up schools to innovate.

A Test of Education Reform

I’m a strong supporter of assessments and accountability, and I wouldn’t opt out, but I think it’s unfair to discount the views of those who disagree.

Charter Schools and Backfill: The Debate We’re Not Having

The backfilling debate is something of a proxy fight between two very different visions for charters. Are they a replacement strategy for disappointing schools and districts? Or are they closer to a poor man’s private school?

Partisanship and Public Opinion on the Common Core

In Louisiana, where the fight over Common Core has been particularly salient, the effect of the “Common Core” label was even more negative than in the American public as whole, and the impact on polarization was greater.

Teacher Layoffs Are Coming, and It’s the Great Recession’s Fault

Much like the Great Depression did, the onset of the Great Recession led to a sharp decline in the U.S. birth rate.

Debunking a Misleading Report on School Choice

The Center for Tax and Budget Accountability released a misleading report on school choice programs in Indiana and elsewhere

A Response to “Breaking the Mold”

Mike Kirst’s review of our book, A Democratic Constitution for Public Education, is insightful and constructive and raises important questions about how our proposal would work in practice.

The Great Achievements of the Every Child Achieves Act

The bipartisan ESEA reauthorization bill crafted by Senators Alexander and Murray represents a very smart compromise on the key issue of accountability

Opt-Out Movement Likely Inconsequential for Teacher Evaluations

In the majority of classrooms, where opt-out appears likely to remain at low levels, the data strongly suggest that students sitting out of standardized testing will have only a trivial impact on the ratings received by their teachers.

Patty Murray and the Return of Wishful Thinking

The bipartisan bill to update the No Child Left Behind Act requires states to pledge that they will get all of their students to college or career readiness, and build those expectations into their accountability systems.

Bravo

The Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, unveiled a few days back by Senators Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray and scheduled for HELP Committee mark-up on April 14, is a remarkable piece of work.

Alexander-Murray: This Is What Compromise Looks Like, in a Single Table

The language in the Alexander-Murray compromise is much less prescriptive than No Child Left Behind’s “adequate yearly progress” concoction, but it’s fairly prescriptive nonetheless.

Creativity, Cartels, and the Supply Side of Choice-Based Reform

Both the pro- and the anti-school choice crowds tend to ignore what should be the central issue when it comes to markets, which is their immense creative potential and the way they can shatter comfortable cartels.

College Preparedness Over the Years, According to NAEP

The proportion of recent high school graduates attending college is far higher than the proportion of twelfth graders who are prepared for college—and that gap has worsened over time.

President Obama and the Politics of Pensions

As evidence mounts showing how poorly structured pension plans fail to meet the needs of today’s workforce, let’s hope more politicians make it a trend.

Choice, Accountability, and Charter Performance

If you’re at all interested in school choice, you really should read a trio of recent reports.

A Troubling Verdict

I found myself caught up short by the Atlanta verdict this week and eleven educators found guilty of racketeering in a widespread cheating scandal.

Why Can’t Politicians Get Out of Schooling?

The reason education policy today feels more invasive is because policymakers have been convinced that the old rules and regulations weren’t getting the job done.

Time For a New Non-District Charter Authorizer in D.C.

Washington, D.C. could offer America’s cities an invaluable new example of an all-charter approach.

The Gender Gap in Reading

The gender gap is large, worldwide, and persistent through the K-12 years. What should be done about it? Maybe nothing.

The Death of the Think Tank, R.I.P.

Think tanks have chosen to focus almost exclusively on advocacy efforts, not realizing that effective advocacy requires generating new, high-quality information.

Not Meeting Standards: A Warning Light, Not A Death Sentence

Here’s what the Common Core is designed to communicate: If your children are meeting the standards, it means they are believed to be on track for college and career readiness by the end of high school

New Systems of Schools and Common Enrollment

If cities simply add more choice schools in the absence of changes to the enrollment process, parents can struggle to find information on schools, be forced to fill out widely varying school applications, and then receive a staggered barrage of acceptance and rejection notices.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors