Pencils Down? Not So Fast

New York State education officials raised a ruckus two weeks ago when they announced that annual statewide reading and math tests, administered in grades 3–8, would no longer be timed.

Charter Schools, Free Association, and Social Entrepreneurship

As the charter school sector expands, we should try to understand how the charter school sector has catalyzed a new generation of civil society organizations to support the sector.

I Ain’t Talking to You If You Ain’t Talking About Structural Reform

In a compelling recent blog post, Washington State’s new Teacher of the Year, warned that he won’t be taking positions on most of the hot policy topics of the day. He said he wants to use his new bully pulpit to talk about the only things that really matter: resource inequities and the need for more high-quality and diverse teachers.

Scapegoating Sports

Brookings fellow Michael Hansen has a piece blaming high school sports for distracting public schools from their mission.

James Coleman, the “Equality of Opportunity” Study, and School Choice

Coleman’s work spawned a large body of research comparing the effectiveness of district, private, and (later) charter schools in preparing students for college and life. A new article reviews that research.

How Should States Measure School Success?

Most of today’s K–12 accountability systems are, themselves, persistently underperforming.

3 Reactions to Our Teacher Prep Reports

Our report, which finds that we don’t actually know very much about how to prepare teachers or help them improve, has generated a lot of feedback.

The Educational Freedom Legacy of Andrew Coulson

Early yesterday morning, after a fifteen month battle with brain cancer, Cato Institute Senior Fellow in Education Policy Andrew Coulson passed away.

Teach for America Recognizes Teachers Need Portable Benefits

Teach for America celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. An increasing number of alumni are staying in the classroom, and the organization has adopted new policies to recognize this.

By    Blog, Editorial  

How Should We Spend $4 Billion on Computer Science Education?

This week, President Obama announced that he would call for a $4 billion dollar commitment in his 2017 budget to bring computer science education to K-12 schools nationwide.

Can We Predict Who Will Be a Great Teacher? An Interview with Allison Atteberry

How much do we know about a teacher before they enter the classroom? What about after they’ve been teaching a few years? Is any of this information strong enough to act on?

Great Ideas For Designing Accountability Systems for Schools

More than two dozen teams have submitted proposals that are chock-full of suggestions for designing better state accountability systems under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

In Search of On-ramps to Competency-based Learning

Many efforts to reinvent learning in a competency-based manner are thwarted by time-based metrics in school districts, but here are some areas where innovations may be able to take root

Arete: Leveraging the Excitement of Competition to Inspire Academic Excellence

A web application hosts live, online academic competitions among students.

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Editorial  

Retreating to an Education System Without School Choice is Not an Option

Many of today’s most difficult education debates are the result of our transition from a highly legible, single-provider model to a decentralized, choice-based model.

Would Making College Free Boost Completion Rates?

Free tuition would be a needless windfall for affluent voters and state institutions that does very little to help the needy.

Ten Things Every American Should Know

An intriguing effort to crowd-source a 2016 version of E.D. Hirsch’s famous list of things you need to know to be culturally literate.

Bullish on Blended-Learning Clusters

An increasing number of regions are trying to create concentrated groups of blended-learning schools alongside education technology companies

The Bush Education Plan

Bush’s plan deserves at least two and a half cheers—which is a cheer or two more than any other GOP candidate has warranted on this issue.

The Case for Maximum State Flexibility on ESSA Accountability

Officials at the Department of Education have requested public comments by January 21 about areas in the new Every Student Succeeds Act where regulation might be “helpful or necessary.” My recommendation to the feds: Tread very lightly.

The 2016 RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings

This list recognizes university-based scholars in the U.S. who are doing the most to influence educational policy and practice.

On Regulating School Choice: A Response to Critics

Refusing to acknowledge that regulations can have real costs or that Louisiana’s voucher program has failed to deliver on its promises does nothing to serve the interests of disadvantaged children.

America’s Most Disadvantaged Students Need Real Accountability, Not Ideology

As the head of the regulatory agency for traditional public, charter public, and non-public schools in Louisiana, I think it’s important to discuss the facts behind a recent study on Louisiana’s private school voucher program.

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Editorial  

Teachers More Likely to Use Private Schools for their Own Kids

These teachers, moreover, support similar choices for other parents and oppose agency fees currently imposed on many.

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