Nine Questions: What Does It Even Mean to Oppose the Common Core?

What does it mean when Ted Cruz, or Rand Paul, or Bobby Jindal says he “opposes” the Common Core?

Portfolio Districts: One Ring to Rule Them All

I am wary of portfolio districts, mayoral takeovers, and other proposals for a super-regulator to govern all choice and traditional schools.

Model Citizens

Arizona became the first state to make passing the U.S. Citizenship Test a high school graduation requirement.

Improving Educational Options for Georgia Children

Raising the cap on Georgia’s scholarship tax credit program is an ideal way to bring freedom and excellence to K-12 education.

ESEA Reauthorization: Some Fixes to the Alexander Draft

Many bloggers have already pronounced their likes and dislikes of Senator Alexander’s ESEA reauthorization draft, and we would like to add to that discussion.

The Case Against Federal Accountability Mandates in Education

Instead of demanding that states intervene in failing schools, allow students to escape the worst schools through the powerful mechanism of parental choice.

To Empower State and Local Leaders, ESEA Reauthorization Should Include Competitive Grants

Competitive grant programs do not weaken local leadership. They strengthen local leadership much more effectively than block grants do.

How Charters Are Innovating on Pensions

Charter schools recognize that current teachers are increasingly mobile, so they offer teachers portable benefits.

How New Funding Models Can Unlock Innovations in Pedagogy

Course Access policies may be paving the way to wholly new learning experiences for students.

Good Reads for National School Choice Week

These articles illuminate some elements of the world of school choice that don’t always get the most attention.

On Designing K-12 Education Savings Accounts

Education savings accounts operate like the “partial voucher” that Milton Friedman envisioned more than a decade ago.

Don’t Confuse Jargon with Rigor

Elementary school English language arts classrooms have long been in the thrall of nonsensical jargon.

Stump Speech Contest: What Members of Congress Should Say About Testing

Here are some “talking points” that members of Congress might use when the testing issue comes up at town hall meetings and the like.

Will the Common Core Lead to More Schools Labeled Failing? Not Really.

Since the Obama Administration has quietly transitioned to a normative accountability system, where schools are compared to each other rather than to some pre-determined “proficiency” benchmark, it doesn’t matter if all students appear to perform worse this year.

Fixing No Child Left Behind: Oral Testimony of Martin West

Congress should maintain the law’s current annual testing requirements while restoring to states virtually all decisions about the design of their accountability systems.

Views from Private Schools

Policymakers seeking to improve the quantity and quality of educational options for families through private school choice programs should consider the opinions of the school leaders poised to serve those customers.

2015: The Year of Curriculum- Based Reform?

Curriculum and content matter—and for no one more than poor kids who get too little of that knowledge and vocabulary at home.

Can an Online College Course Live Up to Students’ Expectations?

What we learned by teaching “Saving Schools: History, Politics and Policy in U. S. Education,” our first Massive Open Online Course

Timely Ohio Report Could Change the ESEA Testing Debate

A new report from the Ohio Department of Education looks at the number of hours students spend preparing for and taking tests.

A Rescue Plan for the Black Family

Far from addressing the marriage problem, the federal government exacerbated it.

Exit, Voice, Loyalty—and the Common Core

Increasingly, parents and taxpayers view the public schools as an unresponsive bureaucracy carrying out edicts from distant capitals.

Grade-Span Accountability Is A Bad Idea: Just Ask CAP and the AFT

Rather than having regular check-ups on student progress, with relatively low stakes on those results, we’d have much higher stakes attached to a smaller number of test scores.

Is It Quality Or Quantity That Counts?

Ah, January is upon us: The wind is howling, the thermometer is plummeting, and we are greeted by the nineteenth consecutive edition of Quality Counts, Education Week’s compilation of mostly useful data, analysis, rankings and commentaries.

Carmen Fariña’s War on Evidence

While running the nation’s largest school system, Carmen Farina has made a growing list of decisions based not on empirical evidence, but on the chancellor’s personal preference.

The Not-So-Secret Recipe for ESEA Reauthorization

As the edu-intelligentsia anxiously anticipates another attempt at updating the law, it’s worth revisiting how we got our last reauthorization.

Sponsored Results
Sponsors

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors

Sponsors

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors