Breaking Down “Public Rules on Private Schools”

While many believe private schools to be “unregulated,” they already follow many regulations, regardless of their participation in a school choice program.

Shooting Bottle Rockets at the Moon: Overcoming the Legacy of Incremental Education Reform

When we fail to right-size our reform efforts, we breed a sense of futility among teachers, parents and policymakers.

To AP or Not To AP?

AP exams are a distinctly American solution to the problem that standards in American education are subjective and vary widely from school to school.

By Guest Bloggers Michael K. Block and Q. Mark Reford    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability  

What Does Competency- Based Education Have To Do With Disruption?

Competency-based education offers a philosophy of how students ought to progress through material; it frees students from the lock step, age-based progressions in traditional schooling.

Another Hidden Penalty On Teachers

In the median state, teachers must wait 24 years before their pension is finally worth more than their own contributions.

Addressing Teachers’ Concerns about Online Learning

As more and more schools adopt blended learning in the years to come, the nature of teaching is going to change.

NACSA’s Sixth Annual Survey and the Future of Authorizing

If charter schooling is to live up to its promise, charter school authorizing must get more attention.

Checking Privilege is Bad Politics

People with more money tend to be better organized and effective at protecting their interests than poor people, so designing a program to stick it to wealthy people is generally a bad idea.

Teacher Dismissals Under New Evaluation Systems

There are flaws in new teacher evaluation systems that need correcting.

By Grover J. "Russ" Whitehurst and Katharine Lindquist    Blog, Editorial, Teachers and Teaching  

How a State Could Achieve Major Gains in Learning, Pay, Economy

Redesigning jobs to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students by having them work in collaborative teams will bring benefits to teachers, students, and the state as a whole.

Intellectual Coherence and the Common Core

Once educators and local (and state) officials see how poorly their kids do on tougher assessments and what the standards really require, they will start looking for better curricular materials and training.

Early Retirement Trade-Offs

Faced with a budget crisis, Illinois offered teachers a generous early retirement package. Large numbers of older, more experienced teachers took the offer, Here’s what happened next.

Stop The False Generalizations About Personalized Learning

The main reason personalized learning is needed is that each student learns at a different pace and each student’s pace tends to vary based on the subject or even concept one is learning.

The ‘Public’ in the Urban Public Education System of the Future

When schools are not run by locally elected school boards, can there still be local control?

Individual District Schools Don’t Serve All Students, Either

It’s a myth that district schools “serve all comers.” They simply don’t. Nor should they. Every child deserves to have his or her needs met, but not necessarily under the same roof.

California’s Pension Debt Will Eat Everything In Its Path

California discovered a $2.4 billion budget surplus from what it projected in January, but that money won’t be going to any new, exciting program.

Blended Learning Impacts More Than Just Academics

At one credit recovery program, it is fascinating to see how blended learning impacts students’ relationships with their teachers and improves the non-academic aspects of their learning.

What Constitutes Success For Course Choice?

“Course choice’ policies give K–12 students the option of taking courses from a range of providers, often but not always online, and public dollars follow students to the chosen course.

Different Standards for Different Students?! We’ve Had Them for Years

Under a provision in the federal No Child Left Behind Act called “safe harbor,” states must set different standards for different groups.

Now You’re Entitled To Your Own Facts Too

In the preschool realm, the U.S. Department of Education has it outsourced the number-gathering to a prominent interest group in the field and it has allowed that interest group to add its own spin.

Letting Go of Time-Based Practices: A closer look at what’s happening in New Hampshire

New Hampshire was the first state to abolish the Carnegie Unit, which made way for the first statewide experiment in competency-based education at the high school level.

Behind the Headline: Teachers Unions Threaten Common Core Implementation

The Washington Post editorial board notes that teachers unions are beginning to push back against the Common Core standards in several states.

The Mystery that is Twelfth-Grade NAEP

One of the great unanswered questions in American education policy is why the major gains we’ve seen on the Nation’s Report Card in the fourth and eighth grades evaporate once students reach the twelfth grade.

The Resilience of Common Core

Given the news coverage, you’d think Common Core’s fate was daily hanging in the balance—that pro and con forces were trading massive victories, swapping gains with each successive battle. But that’s emphatically not happening.

Almost, Peggy, But This Time Not Quite

When it comes to the Common Core State Standards, Peggy Noonan is only about 60 percent right.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors