A Shocking College-Readiness Gap in the Suburbs

Montgomery County is getting just 11 percent of its low-income students to the college-ready level, and fewer than one in five of its minority students.

Actually, Boehner’s Resignation Doesn’t Change the Odds on ESEA

The odds of ESEA reauthorization weren’t good before Boehner’s announcement. After Boehner’s announcement, not a lot has changed.

Sorry, Folks, ESEA Reauthorization Just Got Much Harder

Some folks are claiming that news that House Speaker John Boehner will step down at the end of October makes an ESEA reauthorization more likely this fall. That’s just crazy talk.

In New York City, Mayor Bill De Blasio’s Initiatives Threaten to Widen the Achievement Gap

Mayor de Blasio has shown a good instinct for identifying the right targets—early childhood education and reading. But it’s hard to be encouraged that either he or his chancellor knows how to hit them.

NYT on Education and the Sharing Economy

Words like “market,” “competition,” and “profit” are considered dirty words in some education circles. Will websites that allow teachers to buy and sell lesson plans change the minds of some teachers?

The Real Battle for Common Core Begins

An examination of assignments given by middle school teachers appears to show that most of the work asked of students does not reflect the higher, more rigorous standards set by Common Core.

Correcting Misinformation on School Choice

Yet another author ignores the ample evidence available that school choice provides benefits for children.

Would Pension Plans Be Fine If They Were (Magically) Fully Funded?

Teachers suffer from low salaries while they work in exchange for the promise of better retirement savings when they leave, but for most teachers, that promise never becomes a reality.

More Than A Slogan

Five good reasons federalism is so important in education

On Constitution Day, in Search of the Public Mission of Schools

Today is Constitution Day, when all schools receiving federal funds are expected to provide lessons or other programming on our most important founding document.

Politicians Couldn’t Agree on a “Common” Yardstick for Schools. Statisticians Created One Anyway.

SchoolGrades uses the results of state tests to create a comparable, A-F grading system for all public elementary and middle schools in the U.S.

The Common Core Test Wake-Up Call Is Here

Parents will soon receive for the first time their children’s scores on new tests aligned to the standards. The news is expected to be sobering.

How Independent Schools Can Ward Off Disruption

Micro-schools have the potential to transform the independent schooling landscape—and threaten existing independent schools in the process

A Supreme Hit to Charter Schools in Washington

Last Friday’s 6-3 decision by the Washington Supreme Court that declared unconstitutional a charter school law is an existential threat to the parental choice movement.

Court Ruling Against Charter Schools Romanticizes an Obsolete Version of Local Control

With its ruling, the court has locked Washington State into a defunct, hundred-year-old notion of public schooling.

Why is High School Achievement Flat?

The latest SAT scores are out and seem to show that education reform is hitting a wall in high school.

New Orleans: A Success Story? Yes. A National Model? Maybe Not.

Which strategy should the charter sector pursue in the short- to medium-term: selective chartering or a district-wide replacement strategy?

Six Education Themes for 2016

Here are six education policy themes—and associated infographics—that I hope the Presidential candidates embrace.

Education Governance: Who Makes the Decisions and Who Has the Power?

Our education governance system, lamented and disparaged as it often is, is one of the least understood aspects of American K–12 schooling.

Scott Walker’s Act 10 Caused an Uproar, But Things Are Mostly Back to Normal

In the midst of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s controversial 2011 budget bill, many warned that the state’s public employees, including teachers, would retire in droves.

‘No-Racially-Disparate-Discipline’ Policies Opposed by Both Teachers and General Public

In 2014 the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Justice, acting together, sent every school district a letter asking local officials to avoid racial bias when suspending or expelling students.

Top K-12 Education Policy Organizations and Media Outlets on Social Media 2015

On Wednesday, I published the results of our latest ranking of top education policy people on social media. Now let’s look at organizations and media outlets.

Keep Your Yardsticks Off Teachers’ Careers, Unless . . .

… the results of teacher evaluations are used to give teachers better on-the-job training and meaningful opportunities for advancement.

Can Teachers Really Teach Anywhere?

Teachers are much more likely to move within a state than to cross state lines.

Charter Schools: Taking Stock

It’s time to review the progress of the charter movement and the challenges that lie ahead, what we’ve done right as well as where we’ve gone astray..

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform