Between a Rock and a Hard Place

State education leaders will have to decide if their states are ready to move forward with consequences based on Common Core assessments.

Teacher Autonomy and Blended Learning at USC Hybrid High School

A blended-learning high school experiments with new roles for teachers.

The Three-Sector Approach and Decision-Defending

Why is it so hard to get education reformers to support initiatives that make high-quality private schools accessible to low-income families?

New Deal for Teachers; New Will by Managers

Tenure is just one part of a dysfunctional approach to human resource management in U.S. schools that needs a complete overhaul.

More Easily Firing Bad Teachers Helps Everyone

Early, irreversible decisions about teacher tenure have real costs for students and ultimately all of society.

10 Things to Know about the Vergara Decision

Yesterday, a California superior court overturned five state laws related to the employment of teachers. Here’s what you need to know.

Life Is an Implementation Problem

What matters in education is what actually happens in 100,000 schools educating 50 million kids. That’s all implementation, and that means it matters a lot that some reforms are much more likely to suffer bumps, distortions, and problems than are others.

Are Maryland Teachers Leaving Because of the Common Core or New Teacher Evaluation Requirements? Probably Not.

There are a number of factors that may affect teacher retention in any given year. We should be wary about trying to pin down any one reason.

Who Profits from the Master’s Degree Pay Bump for Teachers?

The fact that teachers with master’s degrees are no more effective in the classroom, on average, than their colleagues without advanced degrees is one of the most consistent findings in education research.

Teacher Benefits Still Eating Away at District Spending

Instead of hiring more teachers or paying them more money, districts are devoting an increasing share of finite resources to employee benefits.

Breaking Down “Public Rules on Private Schools”

While many believe private schools to be “unregulated,” they already follow many regulations, regardless of their participation in a school choice program.

Shooting Bottle Rockets at the Moon: Overcoming the Legacy of Incremental Education Reform

When we fail to right-size our reform efforts, we breed a sense of futility among teachers, parents and policymakers.

To AP or Not To AP?

AP exams are a distinctly American solution to the problem that standards in American education are subjective and vary widely from school to school.

By Guest Bloggers Michael K. Block and Q. Mark Reford    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability  

What Does Competency- Based Education Have To Do With Disruption?

Competency-based education offers a philosophy of how students ought to progress through material; it frees students from the lock step, age-based progressions in traditional schooling.

Another Hidden Penalty On Teachers

In the median state, teachers must wait 24 years before their pension is finally worth more than their own contributions.

Addressing Teachers’ Concerns about Online Learning

As more and more schools adopt blended learning in the years to come, the nature of teaching is going to change.

NACSA’s Sixth Annual Survey and the Future of Authorizing

If charter schooling is to live up to its promise, charter school authorizing must get more attention.

Checking Privilege is Bad Politics

People with more money tend to be better organized and effective at protecting their interests than poor people, so designing a program to stick it to wealthy people is generally a bad idea.

Teacher Dismissals Under New Evaluation Systems

There are flaws in new teacher evaluation systems that need correcting.

By Grover J. "Russ" Whitehurst and Katharine Lindquist    Blog, Editorial, Teachers and Teaching  

How a State Could Achieve Major Gains in Learning, Pay, Economy

Redesigning jobs to extend the reach of excellent teachers to more students by having them work in collaborative teams will bring benefits to teachers, students, and the state as a whole.

Intellectual Coherence and the Common Core

Once educators and local (and state) officials see how poorly their kids do on tougher assessments and what the standards really require, they will start looking for better curricular materials and training.

Early Retirement Trade-Offs

Faced with a budget crisis, Illinois offered teachers a generous early retirement package. Large numbers of older, more experienced teachers took the offer, Here’s what happened next.

Stop The False Generalizations About Personalized Learning

The main reason personalized learning is needed is that each student learns at a different pace and each student’s pace tends to vary based on the subject or even concept one is learning.

The ‘Public’ in the Urban Public Education System of the Future

When schools are not run by locally elected school boards, can there still be local control?

Individual District Schools Don’t Serve All Students, Either

It’s a myth that district schools “serve all comers.” They simply don’t. Nor should they. Every child deserves to have his or her needs met, but not necessarily under the same roof.

Sponsored Results
Sponsors

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors

Sponsors

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors