The Hidden Half: School Employees Who Don’t Teach

Why do American public schools spend more of their operating budgets on non-teachers than almost every other country in the world, including nations that are as prosperous and humane as ours?

Six Myths in the New York Times Math Article by Elizabeth Green

The belief that a particular approach to mathematics instruction—referred to over the past half-century as “progressive,” “constructivist,” “discovery,” or “inquiry-based”—is the answer to improving mathematics learning in the U.S. is not supported by evidence.

Surveying the Common Core Battleground

Common Core’s hardened factions—Champions and Dissidents—appear to separate themselves on at least three worldviews relating to K-12 education

Energized Retrenchment: The Coming Conservative K-12 Approach?

The new conservative approach attempts to advance positive change, not through massive new federal programs or fanciful technical solutions but via traditional, experience-informed means.

New York’s Common Core Tests: Tough Questions, Curious Choices

The bottom line: the tests are hard, as expected, but the choice of texts needs work.

Education Reform’s Most Urgent Task

How can we make sure that the major elements of the policy agenda fit well together and are not working at cross-purposes?

Driving Blended Learning at the State Level

As blended learning continues to grow, one of the challenges education leaders are facing is the fact that knowledge of the concept spreads faster than expertise on how to foster and support it.

Suburbs Hold Key to Resolving Democratic Party’s Tensions over School Choice

On paper, the Democratic Party and huge swaths of black and Hispanic families craving better school options for their kids have been on a collision course for years.

Change and Preservation in Education Reform

Education reform has never thoughtfully discussed, much less enumerated, what ought to be conserved.

KIPP, Student Attrition, and Peer Effects: A Response to Richard Kahlenberg

Our study did address all three ways in which peer influences might make a difference in KIPP’s success, but reached its clearest conclusions about the effects of student attrition and replacement patterns.

What Explains KIPP’s Success? Peers May Be A Big Part of the Story

The new study is far less definitive than advertised because it addresses, at most, only one of the three ways in which peer influences might make a difference in KIPP’s success.

Why Do “Anti-Corporatists” Defend Factory-Style School Leadership?

There’s little reason to expect that century-old assumptions about how to organize and deliver schooling are the smartest way forward.

African-Americans Must Blaze Own Path on School Choice, Ed Reform

I consider myself a proud progressive Democrat. However, I find myself on the outside of my party while defending the most progressive stance I have ever taken.

By Guest blogger    Blog, Editorial  

The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy 2014

It’s August, which can only mean one thing: it’s time for our annual list of top education-policy Twitter feeds.

The Evolution of Teacher Pensions

Over the years, legislators increased pension benefits significantly, but they have not distributed those increases evenly to all teachers.

Saving Schools—Launching My MOOC on HarvardX

On September 8, “Saving Schools” launches. Four (free!) mini- courses on “History, Politics and Policy in U. S. Education”

Save Our Data! Protect the Integrity of Education Statistics

Everything you may be trying to accomplish, change, or protect in American education hinges more than you might realize on the integrity of our education data system and that data system is more vulnerable than you might think.

Is Education Reform Anti- Conservative?

How could I be disposed to preserve venerable institutions and yet favor dramatic K–12 change?

Education Reform in 2014

On August 1, Chester E. “Checker” Finn, Jr., will step down from his role as founding president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, passing the baton to Michael J. Petrilli. Here is his “farewell address” as president.

Teacher-Tenure Decision Is NOT an Abuse of Judicial Power

Vergara precedents are multiple, judge's actions restrained

Vergara precedents are multiple, judge’s actions restrained

A Few Reflections on the Common Core Wars

Monday’s Politico story on the messaging battle over the Common Core has kicked up another round of recriminations, particularly on the Right.

Abracadabra

When policy discourse is taken over by slogan-speak, it undermines the credibility of future attempts at serious policy discussion.

Five Reasons Districts Should Love Course Access

Course Access is still a new policy, but for many students, no matter where they live or what school they attend, it will give them a significantly greater chance to fulfill their potential.

Pre-Kraziness

What is the benefit conferred by preschool if there’s no school after the pre?

Race to the Top Wasn’t

What President Obama termed “the most meaningful education reform in a generation” has proven to be more a cautionary tale than a model.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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