Does Gentrification Explain Rising Student Scores in Washington, DC?

Our new analysis shows that demographic change explains some, but by no means all, of the increase in scores.

Innovations That Bypass School Districts and Go Directly to Teachers and Students

How education reformers can work to improve learning besides pushing for policy changes.

Teachers Union Leaders Support Equity (in Theory) Or, Why We Can’t Have Nice Things In Education

How should public policies address inequities across schools and districts? American Federation of Teacher President Randi Weingarten says we hold schools accountable for how much money they have and the types of programs they build with that money.

Reinventing Research

Research that shows that, on average, a particular approach worked, may be masking a deeper understanding that is critical so that all students—not just most students—succeed.

Not Leaving, Just Changing Jobs

This is the last issue of Education Next for which I will serve as editor-in-chief.

Is The Press Fair and Balanced on Charter Schooling?

A new AEI study analyzes the 2015 charter school coverage from a number of influential media outlets.

Why I Would’ve Voted No on Putting the School Board in Charge of New Orleans Charter Schools

Louisiana has decided that all New Orleans charter schools now overseen by the state’s Recovery School District will be placed under the control of the local school board.

Rumors of Death Premature: Portfolio Management Still Alive and Kicking in New Orleans

Can the portfolio strategy in New Orleans still fog a mirror, or is it dead as Jay Greene has just announced? It looks pretty lively, with all public school kids in charter schools and results improving steadily.

What Do Pac-Man and Pensions Have in Common?

If states continue to preserve their existing pension systems at any cost, teachers will see the Pension Pac-Man eat further and further into their take-home pay.

Portfolio Management Fails in New Orleans

A big problem with building a centralized authority to govern all schools is that you cannot count on the good guys being in charge of that process forever.

How We Make Teaching Too Hard for Mere Mortals

Expecting teachers to be expert pedagogues and instructional designers is one of the ways in which we push the job far beyond the abilities of mere mortals.

Is Dumping the District the Way to Break the Link between Socioeconomic Status and Student Achievement?

If we know that high-performing, high-poverty schools are possible, why is it that not a single urban district in this entire nation has been able to bring those results to scale—even after fifty years of effort?

What Was Accomplished in the Era of Reform via Federal Regulation?

For all their differences, George W. Bush and Barack Obama shared a surprisingly common approach to school reform: a regulatory approach.

What Was Behind the Rise (and Subsequent Fall) in Teacher Turnover?

Despite the conventional wisdom, there’s very little evidence that current education policies are driving teacher turnover.

The Inconvenient Truth About Personalized Learning

Simply asking what works stops short of the real question at the heart of a truly personalized system: what works, for which students, in what circumstances?

Where Did Charter Schools Come From?

The onset of chartering was no lightning bolt. This audacious innovation had multiple ancestors and antecedents.

Local Control and Equity Do Not Mix

The fundamental organization of our school system—a patchwork of 14,000 school districts with geographic monopolies over the residents who live within them—contributes both to spending and educational inequities.

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Editorial  

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week!

To show our appreciation for all the great teachers out there, we’ve pulled together some of our favorite articles that we think teachers might enjoy.

Following the Money in Personalized Learning

Can personalized learning schools sustain expensive staffing models and technology costs after private funding runs out?

Testing Alone Won’t Make Good Readers

Children’s ability to understand what they read is intimately intertwined with their background knowledge and vocabulary. If a child is not broadly educated, he won’t be fully literate.

Arne Duncan, Lamar Alexander, and the Rule of Law

Duncan decried the “dysfunction” in Washington. But surely impugning the “motivations” of our political opponents doesn’t help to add function.

Mr. Duncan’s Sad Legacy

On Monday, former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan returned to Washington DC to speak at a Georgetown University conference.

Every School Can Have a Great Principal: A Fresh Vision for How

A new kind of principal would work with a “team of leaders” made up of great teachers within their school and could also lead multiple schools.

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