Debating Obama-Era Guidance on School Discipline

Should the Trump administration retain, revise, or rescind?

Don’t Walk Back Needed Discipline Reform

In 2014, the Obama administration’s Departments of Education and Justice took an important step to respond to the excessive and racially disparate removal of students from schools across America.

By    Forum, Web-Only  

A Supposed Discipline Fix Threatens School Cultures

This wasn’t just routine guidance. Instead, by applying a shambolic version of disparate impact theory to school discipline, the letter marked an enormous shift in federal policy and set up the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) to be both judge and jury.

Taking Stock of Private-School Choice

Scholars review the research on statewide programs

Programs Benefit Disadvantaged Students

School voucher programs, which allow eligible families to send their children to private schools with the help of public funds, have sparked controversy since the first such initiative was launched in Milwaukee in 1991. Today, 28 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.) operate 54 private-school-choice programs, which include not only government-issued vouchers but also […]

Still Waiting for Convincing Evidence

Do public-school students who move to a private school with a government-funded voucher benefit from making this switch? A growing body of research is shedding light on this question. Of particular interest are findings coming out of three states and the District of Columbia, all of which have implemented ambitious voucher programs over the past […]

Lessons Learned from Indiana

The Indiana Choice Scholarship Program, launched in 2011, offers a rich opportunity to study how a large-scale tuition-voucher program works and to analyze the results it has produced in its first few years. As we consider the merits of private-school choice and what it would take to make it succeed, this initiative deserves particular attention: […]

Should We Limit “Screen Time” in School?

Debating the wisest use of technology in the classroom

Putting Dialogue over Devices Shapes Mind and Character

As we sober up from the tech-infused party of the past 20 years, we should think about what should come first in our schools: shaping not just our students’ ability to persevere and solve difficult problems but also their character—their empathic connection with others, their capacity to see our shared humanity, and their ability to problem solve with others for a common good.

The Problem Is Wasted Time, not Screen Time

The emerging generation of educational technology has the power to accelerate learning productivity in ways we can scarcely imagine. If we can ensure that students are connected to it through the help of teachers, a natural balance between online and offline experiences will develop.

Is the Constitution Colorblind?

Debating Antonin Scalia’s record on race and education

Equal Protection Bars Racial Favoritism

In his 30 years on the Supreme Court, Justice Antonin Scalia wrote surprisingly few opinions in education cases, and even when he did, he seldom mentioned education.

Choosing Judicial Activism Over Originalism

Justice Antonin Scalia was a staunch proponent of “originalism” in constitutional jurisprudence, an approach to deciding cases based on constitutional text as it was originally understood by its authors.

Is Test-Based Accountability Dead?

Three experts weigh in, and look to the future

Why Accountability Matters, and Why It Must Evolve

Try to think of an education policy that 1) has been shown, in dozens of studies across multiple decades, to positively affect student outcomes; 2) has the overwhelming support of parents and voters; 3) reinforces many other policies and facilitates quality research; and 4) has been used widely at the district, state, and national levels for decades or more.

Futile Accountability Systems Should Be Abandoned

Is test-based accountability “on the wane”? The question is based on a fallacy. For something to be on the wane, it has to exist, and test-based accountability has never truly existed in the United States.

If Parents Push for It, Accountability Can Work

The greatest trick the devil ever pulled in education is convincing the American public that we have had test-based accountability. The media and politicians adopted the rhetoric of “high stakes” tests without bothering to ask the question: what, exactly, are the stakes?

The Trump Administration’s $20 Billion School Choice Plan

Debating the wisdom of this idea, and what it might look like in reality

Go Big on School Choice for All 50 States

Forum: The Trump administration’s $20 billion school choice plan

For the Love of Choice, Don’t Federalize It

Forum: The Trump administration’s $20 billion school choice plan

Reconsidering the Supreme Court’s Rodriguez Decision

Is there a federal constitutional right to education?

Inequitable Schools Demand a Federal Remedy 

Rodriguez will one day be considered as erroneous as the court’s approval of the “separate but equal” doctrine in Plessy v. Ferguson.

Federal Courts Can’t Solve Our Education Ills

As a matter of constitutional law, Rodriguez was correctly decided.

Education Reform’s Race Debate

An Education Next Forum

Let’s Build a Modern Reform Coalition

Forum: Education Reform’s Race Debate

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