EdStat: The West Virginia Teachers’ Strike Lasted 9 Days

Could labor activism mean that unions are getting weaker?

Do Strikes Signal Union Strength?

Power and the West Virginia teachers’ strike

EdStat: Being Exposed to a Duty-to-Bargain Law for All 12 Years of Schooling Reduces Male Earnings by Almost $1,500 Per Year

“Duty-to-bargain” laws require school districts to negotiate with teachers unions in good faith.

EdStat: 61 Percent of Respondents Liked the New California School Dashboard Accountability Site

According to a recent Pace and USC Rossier poll, 61 percent of respondents had a positive impression of the California School Dashboard.

What Lies Ahead for Teachers’ Unions After Janus?

We should not discount unions’ ability to adapt their political strategies to find influence even when the pendulum is swinging away from their interests.

Teacher Collective Bargaining and Student Learning

The evidence suggests that teacher collective bargaining leads to worse student outcomes that are reflected in long-run labor market success.

Please, Let Research Inform the Union Debate

There’s emerging evidence that what’s in collective bargaining agreements (CBAs) can influence important outcomes.

EdStat: 46 Percent of the General Public Support Merit Pay for Teachers

According to the 2017 EdNext poll, support for merit pay for teachers among the general public has dropped from 67 percent in 2010 to 46 percent in 2017.

In the News: Will Better Civics Classes Lead to a Better America? Don’t Count on It

In a column for the Washington Post, Jay Mathews challenges the view that the renewed interest in governing caused by the election might lead to better teaching and greater civic virtue.

EdStat: 51 Percent of Parents Support Homeschooling

According to the 2017 EdNext Poll, 51 percent of parents support homeschooling, while just 29 percent oppose it.

Public Sector Unions are Extortion Rackets (and other things we learned in Janus v. AFSCME)

Mark Janus probably feels better right now than AFSCME.

EdStat: 44% of the Public Oppose Agency Fees

Forty-four percent of the public oppose the practice of requiring teachers to pay fees to unions they choose not to join, while just 37% support the practice.

The New Mexico Reform Story

Will Hanna Skandera’s legacy last?

Snap Judgment

Should schools act as community hall monitors?

Bush-Obama School Reform: Lessons Learned

Some takeaways from a conference that examined an array of issues, including lessons learned on accountability, standards, school turnarounds, teacher quality, research, state capacity, and more.

Education for the Common Good

The nation has a vital interest in its future citizens’ acquiring the knowledge and skills without which they will struggle to contribute to the commonweal.

In the News: Is DeVos Near Ending School Discipline Reform After Talks on Race, Safety?

Last week, officials from the U.S. Department of Education met with critics of school discipline policies that were put in place under the Obama administration.

Reflections on the Election in Douglas County

This week’s election of a teachers’ union-backed slate of school board candidates in Douglas County, Colorado is a major setback for school choice.

The Biggest Little Election You’ve Never Heard Of

How a Colorado School-Board Vote Could Boost Vouchers Nationwide

Partisanship and Higher Education: Where Republicans and Democrats Agree

In our most recent public-opinion survey, we find sharp differences between Democrats and Republicans about the value of a bachelor’s degree (as distinct from a two-year associate’s degree).

Changing Support for Charter Schools Among Republicans

Why has support for the schools declined and what could turn that around?

Lynchpin of Teachers Union Power Returns to the Supreme Court

If the Court rules against agency fees it would cause teachers unions’ membership to shrink and the unions’ political and economic wings to be clipped.

Secretary DeVos’ Harvard Speech on School Choice

DeVos delivered a strong speech, articulating points that aren’t made often or forcefully enough.

Government Accountability Goes Unaccountable: Chilling WGU’s Innovation Engine

The Department of Education’s Office of the Inspector General released a faulty audit of a highly innovative model that complies with both the spirit and letter of the law.

In the News: Supreme Court Poised to Deal a Sharp Blow to Unions for Teachers and Public Employees

The Supreme Court announced Thursday that it will hear a case involving the agency fees that teachers and other public employees are required to pay to unions even if they choose not to join the unions.

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