Former Indiana State Chief Tony Bennett and the Politics of Personal Destruction

Last summer, Tony Bennett resigned the Florida superintendency when slammed with alleged improprieties from his tenure as Indiana state chief. Last week, he was cleared of all but one very minor charge.

Whither the NEA?

Perhaps the historic coupling of the NEA and the Democratic Party is loosening a bit.

On School Discipline, Let’s Not Repeat All Our Old Mistakes

President Obama’s policy will have a predictable effect: eliminating suspensions and expulsions as an option for school administrators.

Vergara, Harris, and the Fate of the Teacher Unions

We’re in a period of profound change in teacher-union leadership, with more combative leaders in ascendance, But what the unions really need are leaders able to craft winning platforms with a new orientation.

Pie in the Special-Ed Sky?

Will the new federal regulatory scheme lead to real change on the ground?

Americans Want Choice, Not Government Mandates

The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice has released the results of a national survey on education policy.

Five Thoughts on Randi Weingarten’s AEI Remarks

Why teachers unions and school reformers distrust each other and where they might find common ground.

Behind the Headline: Teachers Unions Threaten Common Core Implementation

The Washington Post editorial board notes that teachers unions are beginning to push back against the Common Core standards in several states.

SEA Reform and Violent Agreement

Our report on reforming state departments of education has generated some very thoughtful responses.

USED, Indiana’s ESEA Waiver, and an Unexpected Federalism Paradox

Now that Washington State has lost its waiver and Indiana could be on a path to nonrenewal, we shouldn’t be surprised if people start asking increasingly pointed questions about why other states, similarly noncompliant, haven’t been dinged.

Common Core: The Day After

What happens when opponents of the Common Core State Standards finally succeed in getting a state’s policymakers to “repeal” the education initiative?

By Michael J. Petrilli and Michael Brickman    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability, State and Federal  

The New SEA: At the Helm, Not the Oar

The state education agency was never intended to lead complex, contentious, large-scale reforms that require original thinking, nimble action and constant adaptability.

Superintendent Duncan Yanks Washington’s Waiver

Duncan is punishing Washington state and re-imposing provisions of a law that he has termed “broken” because its legislature failed to heed his mandate

The Bay State, British Blues, and Barber

A new report by Sir Michael Barber Barber’s is an exhaustive—if exhausting—assessment of Massachusetts’ standing and a thorough plan for generating improved results.

Behind the Headline: Court Backs Michigan on Affirmative Action

The Supreme Court Tuesday upheld a Michigan measure that banned the use of affirmative action in admission to the state’s public universities.

Eye-Opening Snapshot of State-Level Reform Activity

Developments in South Carolina, Tennessee, Kansas, Indiana, and Louisiana

Jeb Bush, the Common Core, and 2016

In a crowded 2016 field, education could and should be a critical asset for a potential Bush candidacy. What happens with Common Core over the next 24 months will determine whether it is.

The Education Iron Triangle

An excerpt from Teachers Versus the Public

Beating the Odds: Some School Boards Can Do It

A new study uses survey data from 900 school board members in 419 school districts.

Five Takeaways from Race to the Top Year-Three Reports

Today, the U.S Department of Education released Year-Three reports on the 12 states that won funding via Race to the Top’s first two competitions.

Now is the Time for State Policymakers to Embrace New Models of Learning

State education policy should enhance the connected life of the student, not restrict it.

Kansas Courts Get It Right

Instead of deciding whether or not the Kansas legislature had dedicated sufficient funds to its local schools, the Kansas Supreme Court chose to highlight the importance of student outcomes.

Educating for Infancy

Schools, we are constantly told, are supposed to educate students for citizenship. Part of being an American citizen is learning to tolerate speech that you don’t like.

Mayoral Control in the Windy City

Emanuel battles to improve Chicago schools

Emanuel battles to improve Chicago schools

Ballots Not Barristers

Arizona case shows limits of litigation

Arizona case shows limits of litigation

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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