New Waiver Guidance Will Sink Schools Where All Boats Are Rising

Because there are achievement gaps at Sawgrass Elementary School, the folks in Washington don’t think this school deserves an A.

The Teacher Equity Problem Is Real. The Proposed Solutions Are Not.

If teachers are the most-important in-school factor for student growth, we certainly don’t act like it.

Ten Things To Know About The 2014 Elections

My admittedly late thoughts on last night’s results.

Redefining the School District in Michigan

The Education Achievement Authority in Michigan is charged with resuscitating the state’s worst schools within the confines of a separate, autonomous district.

Ten Facts About What the Candidates Are Saying on Education

What candidates running for governor and the U.S. Senate have to say on K-12, higher ed, and pre-K.

Arne Duncan’s Office of Civil Rights: Six Years of Meddling

There’s been no problem too big or too small for Arne Duncan’s Department of Education to tackle. His Office of Civil Rights has been a prime example of executive overreach and federal interference run amok.

What the 2014 Senate Elections Might Mean for Education

If the Republicans take the Senate, Senator Lamar Alexander would take the helm of the Senate HELP Committee, which is a big deal.

New OCR Guidance on Equitable Resources: A Godsend for Charter Schools?

I’d love to see charter associations ask OCR to investigate states that don’t do enough to provide equitable funding to charter schools serving high proportions of poor and minority children.

Where Does Government Education Research Really Come From?

When Congress convenes in lame-duck status between November and January, taking up the future of NCES would be timely.

Demonstrate College Readiness If You Want a Federal Grant or Loan

Before receiving a federal grant that never needs to be repaid (as is the case with Pell grants and some loans), the recipient should demonstrate that they are worthy of support by passing an appropriate set of examinations.

K-12 Leaders & Laggards Circa 2014: How the States Are Doing

Leaders & Laggards grades each state on how it’s doing in 11 areas, using an A to F scale.

Thanks, Bobby Jindal!

When the court decides, as it almost certainly has to that, in fact, no one forced Louisiana or any other state to adopt Common Core, the most effective anti-Common Core argument goes, “Poof!”

Stuck in the Middle with State-Level Reform

There is a yawning gap between the stirring language in state constitutions promising great primary and secondary schools and the nitty-gritty work of actually living up to that responsibility.

Save Our Data! Protect the Integrity of Education Statistics

Everything you may be trying to accomplish, change, or protect in American education hinges more than you might realize on the integrity of our education data system and that data system is more vulnerable than you might think.

Race to the Top Wasn’t

What President Obama termed “the most meaningful education reform in a generation” has proven to be more a cautionary tale than a model.

The Federal Government Is Not a State, and ESEA Does Not Give Arne Duncan Mandate Authority

Where is the “plain language” of ESEA that gives the Department of Education the authority to mandate statewide teacher-evaluation systems, particularly for states that want waivers on school accountability. Just as with ObamaCare and the question of whether the federal government is a “state,” the administration won’t have a good answer.

Former Indiana State Chief Tony Bennett and the Politics of Personal Destruction

Last summer, Tony Bennett resigned the Florida superintendency when slammed with alleged improprieties from his tenure as Indiana state chief. Last week, he was cleared of all but one very minor charge.

On School Discipline, Let’s Not Repeat All Our Old Mistakes

President Obama’s policy will have a predictable effect: eliminating suspensions and expulsions as an option for school administrators.

Pie in the Special-Ed Sky?

Will the new federal regulatory scheme lead to real change on the ground?

SEA Reform and Violent Agreement

Our report on reforming state departments of education has generated some very thoughtful responses.

USED, Indiana’s ESEA Waiver, and an Unexpected Federalism Paradox

Now that Washington State has lost its waiver and Indiana could be on a path to nonrenewal, we shouldn’t be surprised if people start asking increasingly pointed questions about why other states, similarly noncompliant, haven’t been dinged.

Common Core: The Day After

What happens when opponents of the Common Core State Standards finally succeed in getting a state’s policymakers to “repeal” the education initiative?

By Michael J. Petrilli and Michael Brickman    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability, State and Federal  

The New SEA: At the Helm, Not the Oar

The state education agency was never intended to lead complex, contentious, large-scale reforms that require original thinking, nimble action and constant adaptability.

Superintendent Duncan Yanks Washington’s Waiver

Duncan is punishing Washington state and re-imposing provisions of a law that he has termed “broken” because its legislature failed to heed his mandate

The Bay State, British Blues, and Barber

A new report by Sir Michael Barber Barber’s is an exhaustive—if exhausting—assessment of Massachusetts’ standing and a thorough plan for generating improved results.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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