Even with Limited Leverage, Uncle Sam Can Promote School Choice

Romney’s plan to voucherize Title I and IDEA has considerable merit—but it’s not the only way the federal government could foster school choice and it might not even be the best way.

Do We Need National Standards to Prevent a Race to the Bottom?

If a race to the bottom is fueled by the desire to satisfy federal bureaucratic rules, why would we think the solution is in the adoption of more federal bureaucratic rules?

‘Vouchers Unspoken,’ Predictable—But Unproductive

Whatever its other virtues or defects, Romney’s plan should be debated on the basis of what it actually proposes—and not a politically-colored version thereof.

Innosight Institute’s Comments on Race to the Top District Draft

We hope that Race to the Top-District competition encourages substantive student-centered reform, and in order to ensure this clear purpose we have a few suggested revisions.

The Romney Education Plan: Replacing Federal Overreach on Accountability with Federal Overreach on School Choice

A better idea might be to take a page from the Obama Administration handbook and make funding portability voluntary.

When Washington Focuses on Schools

Uncle Sam is dreadful at micromanaging what actually happens in schools and classrooms. What he’s best at is setting agendas and driving priorities.

A States’ Rights Insurrection Led by…California?

Three cheers for California’s governor, state superintendent, and state board chair, for applying for a waiver from NCLB that doesn’t kowtow to Washington.

What We’re Watching: Reform School – New Series by ChoiceMedia.TV

Jay Greene and Joe Williams discuss the role of the federal government in education in the pilot episode of a new show.

By Education Next    State and Federal, Video  

Jack Jennings and a Half-Century of School Reform

Much as I respect and admire Jack Jennings, in spite of all his experience in this field, his main tool remains federal legislation, which I’ve come to believe is almost always wielded clumsily in pursuit of nails that either won’t budge at all or end up bent.

Putting the Schools in Charge

An entrepreneur’s vision for a more responsive education system

An entrepreneur’s vision for a more responsive education system

Republicans for Education Reform

These bills could pass both chambers of Congress tomorrow.

Florida Reformers Got It Right

Hybrid schoolers reap the benefits

Hybrid schoolers reap the benefits

The 2012 Republican Candidates (So Far)

What they’ve said and done on education in the past, and what they might do about our public schools if elected

What they’ve said and done on education in the past, and what they might do about our public schools if elected

Shouldn’t the Public Sector Share the Pain?

If the right cuts are made, the public sector can remain equally effective but operate in a more efficient manner.

Let’s Talk Education Reform: A GOP candidate’s speech

The Republican presidential field is beginning to take shape, and candidates and maybe-candidates are figuring out where they stand and what to say. Sooner or later, they will need to say something about education. May we suggest a few talking points?

President’s Approval Rating Turns Negative: Not accidentally, bipartisanship does too

Two numbers that have come out since last Friday are depressing the chances for action on federal education policy. Everyone now knows that employment ticked upward to 9.2 percent, but few have noticed that Obama’s Real Clear Politics (RCP) job approval rating, positive for most of 2011, turned negative early Sunday morning.

A Federal Policy Proposal that Won’t Change the World

Uncle Sam is at least three steps removed from the classroom, and all the carrots and sticks in the world won’t allow him to make everything right in our schools.

Arnius Duncanus?

Poor Arne. Nobody seems to like his warning to Congress that if it doesn’t get cracking on NCLB reauthorization he will take matters into his own hands via regulations.

U.S. Dept. of Ed. is Breaking the Law

It is now clear, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s own description, that the Department is in violation of the law by which it was created.

Steiner Wins Race to the Top but Won’t be Going to the Promised Land

When David Steiner, a reformer’s reformer, announced last week that he was giving up the reins as New York state’s Commissioner of Education, the education world seemed to take a collective deep breath.

Joe Williams on How New York Won the Race to the Top

The inside story of how the legislation to raise the charter cap and remove the firewall between student data and teacher evaluations came to pass.

Jay Greene and Kevin Carey: The Anti-Tight Right vs. The Anti-Loose Left

Recent pieces by Jay Greene and Kevin Carey serve as effective bookends on the current ESEA debate picking up steam in Congress.

Diplomatic Mission

President Obama’s path to performance pay

President Obama’s path to performance pay

Does Competition Improve Public Schools?

New evidence from the Florida tax-credit scholarship program

New evidence from the Florida tax-credit scholarship program

By Cassandra M.D. Hart and    Homepage, Journal, Research, State and Federal  

I3 Is “New American Schools” All Over Again

Alexander Russo nailed it this morning when he wrote that “old school reforms win big in i3.” Indeed. What hit me when I saw the list of winners–especially the groups that brought home the big bucks–was that this is New American Schools all over again.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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