Behind the Headline: How Common Core Brought Attention To The Math Education Debate

John O’Connor takes a close look at some of the debates that are taking place over how math is taught in states that are implementing the Common Core standards and at the long history of debates over math instruction.

One Size Fits Most, Even in the Suburbs

A subset of white, affluent, well-educated parents have long favored progressive education. Alternative schools are a good option for them.

Stop Pitting Technology Against Quality, In-Person Time

Technology can help us redesign schools to allow students to have far more meaningful face-to-face interactions with teachers and peers

Doug Lemov Reveals His Secrets

Doug Lemov’s work identifying what “champion” teachers do has been nothing short of transformational.

Is Common Core Too Hard for Kindergarten?

We can have kindergarten that is both play-based and language-rich. It’s what the best kindergarten teachers have always done.

Coursera, K12, Inc. Make Bold Moves to Drive Learning

The two innovators still have a significant amount of work ahead, but their moves are pointing in the right direction.

Three False Dichotomies in Blended Learning

Don’t assume that by adding blended learning, we must automatically be detracting from something else.

Model Citizens

Arizona became the first state to make passing the U.S. Citizenship Test a high school graduation requirement.

What Does Online Learning Look Like?

Examples from Florida and Pennsylvania

Examples from Florida and Pennsylvania

Can an Online College Course Live Up to Students’ Expectations?

What we learned by teaching “Saving Schools: History, Politics and Policy in U. S. Education,” our first Massive Open Online Course

Is It Quality Or Quantity That Counts?

Ah, January is upon us: The wind is howling, the thermometer is plummeting, and we are greeted by the nineteenth consecutive edition of Quality Counts, Education Week’s compilation of mostly useful data, analysis, rankings and commentaries.

Carmen Fariña’s War on Evidence

While running the nation’s largest school system, Carmen Farina has made a growing list of decisions based not on empirical evidence, but on the chancellor’s personal preference.

Five Predictions for Education in 2015

A few scattered predictions from around the world of education about what we might see.

What We’re Listening To: Freakonomics Radio on America’s Education Problem

How much of the problem lies in our teaching, and what’s to be done about it?

Teachers Are Mobile and Need Portable Retirement Benefits

The median U.S. worker has less than five years of experience at his or her current job and teachers are no exception.

The Missing Link Between Standards and Instruction

Standards for any subject are most effective when used not to drive lesson planning on any given day, but rather the selection of a clear, teacher-friendly, coherently developed curriculum.

Cisco Networking Academy Provides Clues For Future Of Testing

The online training program’s diverse assessment system and its flexibility should help us move toward a competency-based learning system in which time is variable but learning is constant.

Behind the Headline: Teach For America Facing Recruitment Challenges

Teach for America has notified its partner districts that it is on track to train a smaller corps of teachers this year, possibly falling short of demand for its teachers by 25 percent.

Pension Theory Versus Pension Reality

In the fantasy world that the National Institute on Retirement Security has created, state pension plans do a bang-up job of delivering benefits to workers. That’s just not the reality of the world we live in.

What Computer Science Education Can Tell Us About The Future Of Schools

Some of the pedagogical models we see emerging in computer science may be a harbinger of not just what we need to teach in the 21st century, but how we may come to teach it.

Ed Next Book Club: Dana Goldstein on The Teacher Wars

Mike Petrilli interviews Dana Goldstein about her new book on teachers.

inBloom’s Collapse Offers Lessons For Innovation In Education

inBloom, a non-profit that offered a data warehouse solution designed to help public schools embrace the promise of personalized learning, collapsed and has ceased to exist, as privacy concerns from interested parties mounted over a period of many months

Implementing Teacher Evaluation in New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Education has produced a report on the status of its new teacher evaluation efforts.

Should Teaching “Soft” Skills Be A Priority?

An interview with Paul Tough, author of How Children Succeed

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Curriculum, Editorial  

What Else Should KIPP Be Doing With Blended Learning?

Is KIPP falling prey to the classic innovator’s dilemma by not deploying disruptive innovations?

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors