Can a Redesigned AP Government Course Get Schools Back Into the Civic Education Game?

If a new seriousness about civic education takes root, schools may turn to the new off-the-shelf curriculum developed by the College Board.

Why Should Education Advocates Care About Pension Reform?

Here are my best arguments for why education advocates should invest their time and political capital in pensions, as opposed to everything else they might want to work on.

A Silver Lining for Online Higher Education?

While the overall picture regarding online higher education is mixed, some new papers present some cause for optimism, especially if we can figure out ways to successfully monitor and certify the quality of online education.

Are Teacher Turnover Rates Rising? Maybe Not

We may just be employing more teachers who fall into career stages with high turnover.

In the News: Math Teachers: Open Resources Come With Risks

The NCTM released a statement warning of the challenges math teachers can face when schools rely too heavily on open educational resources.

When Cultivating Expertise, Here’s How Technology Can Help

The areas of practice, demonstration, and feedback are where technology really supports learning.

The False Dichotomy Between Memorization and Conceptual Understanding

Experts tend to forget just how much they’ve absorbed into long-term memory, so when they train novices, they tend to leave out a large amount of important information.

A Broader View of OER: In Response to McShane’s Article on Open Education

Open education is a crucial means to organize and transform the work of faculty, teachers, librarians, independent scholars and learners.

Inputs Do Not Guarantee Outcomes: Getting Online Credit Recovery Right

It is a mistake to demand that online credit-recovery courses require the same time and effort as regular courses.

Why You Should Learn to Love Educational Productivity

Technologies today offer the promise of extending the impact of the instruction, tutoring, and mentoring of a terrific teacher so that she can coach, tutor, or instruct hundreds with the same energy she once expended reaching only five or twenty-five.

Pension Incentives and Teacher Retention

In St. Louis, a substantial boost to pension benefits did not boost teacher retention.

Virtual Reality Digs Into Brick-and-Mortar Schools

As the hype around virtual reality in education swells, new developments show that the movement may have some staying power this time around.

There’s A Huge Flaw in the ‘Teacher Shortage’ Data

Earlier this month the Learning Policy Institute (LPI) released a report with the worrying title, “A Coming Crisis in Teaching? Teacher Supply, Demand, and Shortages in the U.S.”

Technology’s Unmet Progressive Promise

Maybe today’s technology can finally make a progressive teaching approach more doable for teachers and students in more classrooms.

Getting Past the Broken “Teachers vs. Technology” Debate

Rather than seeing technology as either a threat to or poor substitute for teachers, we need to determine how best to use technology to enhance teachers’ capabilities.

Hiring Teachers After the School Year Starts Harms Students

Somewhere between 10 and 30 percent of all new teachers are hired after the school year begins.

Beware the Iconography Trap of Personalized Learning: Rigor Matters

Personalized learning will not help students if they are working with content that is below their capacity.

Can Special Ed Be Fixed?

Everybody is scared to touch special education, much less fundamentally alter it.

Tackle Teacher Shortages with Online Learning

Online learning allows educators to reach students from anywhere in the country and experts to supplement traditional teaching,

What We’re Watching: Match Charter School Shares Its Curriculum

Match Charter School, a high-performing preK-12 school in Boston, is making its curriculum available to teachers everywhere through Match Fishtank.

What Does it Mean to ‘Raise the Bar’ for Entry Into the Teaching Profession?

Policymakers have few useful tools to screen out “bad” teachers from the profession. The current screening tools are doing little more than unnecessarily limiting the supply of new teachers.

A Strong Case for a Knowledge-Centric Curriculum

Why Knowledge Matters, E. D. Hirsch, Jr.’s fifth book on education, is as important as his first.

As Google Steals its Education Thunder, What Can Microsoft Do?

It would be great to see Microsoft focus on three things that will transform our education system into a more student-centered one.

The Many Ways Teacher Diversity May Benefit Students

At least three distinct theories have been proposed about how moving away from a majority-white teacher workforce would be beneficial for students of color.

The Wrong and Right Ways to Ensure Equity in IDEA

Are U.S. schools over-identifying children for special ed based on their race or ethnicity? The best-available studies find that the opposite is occurring.

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