Cisco Networking Academy Provides Clues For Future Of Testing

The online training program’s diverse assessment system and its flexibility should help us move toward a competency-based learning system in which time is variable but learning is constant.

Behind the Headline: Teach For America Facing Recruitment Challenges

Teach for America has notified its partner districts that it is on track to train a smaller corps of teachers this year, possibly falling short of demand for its teachers by 25 percent.

Pension Theory Versus Pension Reality

In the fantasy world that the National Institute on Retirement Security has created, state pension plans do a bang-up job of delivering benefits to workers. That’s just not the reality of the world we live in.

What Computer Science Education Can Tell Us About The Future Of Schools

Some of the pedagogical models we see emerging in computer science may be a harbinger of not just what we need to teach in the 21st century, but how we may come to teach it.

Ed Next Book Club: Dana Goldstein on The Teacher Wars

Mike Petrilli interviews Dana Goldstein about her new book on teachers.

inBloom’s Collapse Offers Lessons For Innovation In Education

inBloom, a non-profit that offered a data warehouse solution designed to help public schools embrace the promise of personalized learning, collapsed and has ceased to exist, as privacy concerns from interested parties mounted over a period of many months

Implementing Teacher Evaluation in New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Education has produced a report on the status of its new teacher evaluation efforts.

Should Teaching “Soft” Skills Be A Priority?

An interview with Paul Tough, author of How Children Succeed

By Guest Blogger    Blog, Curriculum, Editorial  

What Else Should KIPP Be Doing With Blended Learning?

Is KIPP falling prey to the classic innovator’s dilemma by not deploying disruptive innovations?

A Better Path Than ‘Blowing Up’ Schools of Education

Given their steady revenues, credentialing authority, political relationships, and millions of alumni not much interested in major change, “blowing up” the existing schools of education is just not a viable option. It’s not even a desirable one.

Illinois Turns Its Back to the Future

A court ruling is potentially very problematic for new teachers and those who aren’t yet teaching.

How To Get Blended Learning Right

What happens when reformers try to use blended learning in a disruptive way in the hardest-to-serve parts of Detroit?

A Response to Carol Burris and Rick Hess on Common Core Math in the Elementary Grades

Common Core has the potential to shift and drastically improve math instruction in American schools,

The Teacher Equity Problem Is Real. The Proposed Solutions Are Not.

If teachers are the most-important in-school factor for student growth, we certainly don’t act like it.

Do Value-Added Estimates Identify Causal Effects of Teachers and Schools?

There is now substantial evidence that value-added estimates capture important information about the causal effects of teachers and schools

Where’s the Person in Personalized Learning?

What personalized learning looks like now, what it could be, and how technology can help.

Do States Really Need an Education Technology Plan?

Simply having a technology plan may not be a meaningful proxy for a clear blended learning strategy or support system.

Teachers Would Prefer Cash

A common perception about how we pay public sector workers is fundamentally flawed.

School Reform, Philadelphia Style

On Monday, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission shocked the city by announcing that it would unilaterally cut health care benefits to city teachers rather than continue to negotiate with the teacher’s union.

How To Kill Reading Achievement

Complaints about close reading bother me less than its potential overuse, or the creeping notion that close reading is what all reading instruction should look like under Common Core. That would be bad for the standards, and even worse for reading achievement in the U.S.

Behind the Headline: Parent Says No Mush For His First-Grader

In his column, Jay Mathews highlights a blog entry by Mike Petrilli about the weak, content-free curriculum being taught to his first grader in the Montgomery County, Md. public schools.

Teach for America’s Retirement Gap

While most TFA teachers may not realize it, almost all are losing out on retirement benefits for their time in the classroom.

The Latest XPrize and How It May Succeed or Fail

The XPrize is funding its first edtech competition to handsomely reward the team that develops the best software to help children in developing countries teach themselves basic literacy and math.

Ending Teacher Tenure Would Have Little Impact on its Own

Data from North Carolina suggest that principals are not using the four-year period before teachers qualify for tenure to identify and remove their lowest performers.

Leveled Reading: The Making of a Literacy Myth

Opponents of the Common Core question the idea of improving literacy by introducing higher levels of textual complexity into the instructional mix.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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