New Research Answers Whether Technology is Good or Bad for Learning

There’s been an infuriating log-jam between those who argue technology is a distraction at best and those who argue it is an extremely positive force.

The Importance of a Diverse Teaching Force

Bachelor’s degree completion gaps make it much harder to achieve a teaching force whose diversity mirrors that of the student population.

Can Hot Wheels Change the Way We Teach STEM?

Researchers developed a hands-on curriculum and professional development lessons teaching basic physics using the popular toys, then conducted a randomized controlled trial.

College Needs a Rethink

Higher education today gives analysts, policymakers, and critics so much to fret about that we haven’t been paying nearly enough heed to the quality and value of the product itself.

Without the Right Curriculum, Personalized Learning Is Just Another Fad

Personalizing learning will be most powerful when it is coupled with intentional, coherent and rigorous instruction.

Partisanship and Higher Education: Where Republicans and Democrats Agree

In our most recent public-opinion survey, we find sharp differences between Democrats and Republicans about the value of a bachelor’s degree (as distinct from a two-year associate’s degree).

Online Schooling: Who Is Harmed and Who Is Helped?

A review of studies that measure the causal impact of online courses.

A Few More Questions for the National History Teacher of the Year

Sara Ziemnik answers some practical questions from teachers about how she teaches history.

Top Charter Networks Turning Attention to Curriculum

Rather than viewing curricular uniformity as a straightjacket, KIPP decided to build a coherent curriculum as a resource for its teachers.

The Power of Teacher Expectations

How racial bias hinders student attainment

When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

Today’s frenzied enthusiasm for computer-assisted “personalized learning” could lead us to charge into some all-too-predictable pitfalls.

Straight Up Conversation: 2017 National History Teacher of the Year Sara Ziemnik

A chat with Sara Ziemnik about teaching history and how to nurture open and respectful debate in an era of polarization and general nastiness.

In the News: ‘Open’ Curricula Offerings Expand to Social Studies

The Core Knowledge Foundation has released a free online social studies curriculum for grades 3 to 5.

Should We Limit “Screen Time” in School?

Debating the wisest use of technology in the classroom

Putting Dialogue over Devices Shapes Mind and Character

As we sober up from the tech-infused party of the past 20 years, we should think about what should come first in our schools: shaping not just our students’ ability to persevere and solve difficult problems but also their character—their empathic connection with others, their capacity to see our shared humanity, and their ability to problem solve with others for a common good.

The Problem Is Wasted Time, not Screen Time

The emerging generation of educational technology has the power to accelerate learning productivity in ways we can scarcely imagine. If we can ensure that students are connected to it through the help of teachers, a natural balance between online and offline experiences will develop.

What We Know About Career and Technical Education in High School

States have been very active in passing laws about CTE. They now need to step up and support research that can help ensure these new initiatives are successful.

In the News: Hispanic Dropout Rate Hits New Low, College Enrollment at New High

New data from the Census Bureau show that the high school dropout rate among U.S. Hispanics has fallen to a new low, and that the reduction has come alongside a long-term increase in Hispanic college enrollment.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

Government Accountability Goes Unaccountable: Chilling WGU’s Innovation Engine

The Department of Education’s Office of the Inspector General released a faulty audit of a highly innovative model that complies with both the spirit and letter of the law.

Big Data Transforms Education Research

Can machine learning unlock the keys to great teaching?

Teachers Unions Blow an Easy Chance to Walk the Walk

Why are the unions not more concerned about a new study finding that 28% of district teachers miss more than ten days of school for personal and sick leave?

Race, Poverty, and Interpreting Overrepresentation in Special Education

Research shows that racial and ethnic minority students are less likely to be identified for special education than white students when you take other student characteristics into account.

Public Schools’ Billion-Hour Teacher Absenteeism Problem

28.3 percent of teachers in traditional public schools miss eleven or more days of school for illness or personal reasons.

CUNY’s New Approach to Transferring College Credit

An excerpt from Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at the City University of New York

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