David Brooks and the Language of Privilege

It is within our power as educators and policymakers to help all children acquire the language of privilege so they will not be excluded.

The Social-Emotional-Learning Movement and the Self-Esteem Movement

Social Emotional Learning will almost surely turn out to have no real scientific foundation.

Cultural Activity Matters

A rigorously designed study out of Denmark shows that cultural activity among students is strongly (and likely causally) related to later academic success.

Reading and Wronging

A review of “Language at the Speed of Sight” by Mark Seidenberg

Time to Connect Professional Development and Teacher Training to Curriculum

Why is it so rare that thoughtfully vetted instructional materials form the foundation of professional learning for teachers?

Curriculum Becomes a Reform Strategy

It’s too soon to declare that curriculum has made its way solidly into the ed-reform arsenal, but the evidence is mounting that it’s entering.

A Cage-Busting Curriculum for Teachers

How teachers can navigate bureaucracy and the shoals of policy in order to make schools and systems more supportive of their work.

Civil Society and Job Training

Instead of trying to use public policy to develop training programs for the workforce of the future, let’s instead rest our hopes on a vast array of small-scale, nimble, local solutions crafted by civil-society actors.

A Better Future for Rural Communities Starts at the Schoolhouse

Students need to know that the economy constantly changes and that everyone, no matter how well educated, must be alert to trends in the demand for skills.

Big Bang for Just a Few Bucks: The Impact of Math Textbooks in California

Textbooks are one of the most widely used educational inputs, but remarkably little is known about their effects on student learning.

Lessons on Common Core

Critical books offer more folly than wisdom

AP Government is All Government and No Civics; All Federal and No Federalism

We need a rigorous curriculum to teach students the civics of the local and the experiential.

Can a Redesigned AP Government Course Get Schools Back Into the Civic Education Game?

If a new seriousness about civic education takes root, schools may turn to the new off-the-shelf curriculum developed by the College Board.

Technology’s Unmet Progressive Promise

Maybe today’s technology can finally make a progressive teaching approach more doable for teachers and students in more classrooms.

Beware the Iconography Trap of Personalized Learning: Rigor Matters

Personalized learning will not help students if they are working with content that is below their capacity.

What We’re Watching: Match Charter School Shares Its Curriculum

Match Charter School, a high-performing preK-12 school in Boston, is making its curriculum available to teachers everywhere through Match Fishtank.

A Strong Case for a Knowledge-Centric Curriculum

Why Knowledge Matters, E. D. Hirsch, Jr.’s fifth book on education, is as important as his first.

Should Civic Education Emphasize Diversity or What We Have in Common?

The key to creating conditions that sincerely celebrate diversity may lie in focusing the attention of our children on what makes us one country.

Cultural Literacy in the Age of the Hashtag

Last month, on the heels of the Supreme Court’s decision in Fisher v. University of Texas, the hashtag ‪#‎BeckyWithTheBadGrades began trending on Twitter.

The Bronx is Learning

Content-rich curriculum drives achievement at Icahn Charter School

How To Create Accountability Systems that Build Knowledge and Increase Reading Ability

Accountability plans must ensure that every student gets the broad knowledge and vocabulary that remain the unacknowledged drivers of language proficiency

The Case for a Broader Approach to Education

A broader education, including the arts, may be essential for later success in math and reading as well as the proper development of civic values and character skills,

Will the Decline of AP Course Offerings Spur the Rise of Course Access?

If we believe that the school you attend should not determine the limits of the courses you can take, then states, rather than individual schools, must step in to ensure that all students can benefit from innovations in online learning to access coursework.

ESEA and the Return of a Well-Rounded Curriculum

The sooner schools see building knowledge across the curriculum as Job One in strengthening reading comprehension, the better.

Curriculum: The Great Divide Among Education Reformers

For some education reformers, other reforms seem much more important than curriculum battles. Here’s what they are missing.

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