Challenging the Gifted

Nuclear chemistry and Sartre draw the best and brightest to Reno

Nuclear chemistry and Sartre draw the best and brightest to Reno

What Did Klein Learn? Not Much, Apparently

I love Joel Klein. He made New York City a magnet for reform-minded entrepreneurs, sent forth more than a few excellent leaders to other big city school systems, and is never afraid to speak his truth. But his Wall Street Journal op-ed today is really lame.

All Together Now?

Educating high and low achievers in the same classroom

Educating high and low achievers in the same classroom

The College Board and Foreign Languages

Italian professors all across the country should salute the College Board and the advocates who pressed for reviving the course, including Dr. Margaret Cuomo, the Italian Language Foundation, and the Italian Government.

Holding Students Accountable for Changing into Their Gym Clothes

Are traditional P.E. classes likely to be an effective tool in fighting obesity? What little research there is finds no association between PE and weight loss and obesity. One reason more P.E. has not led to weight loss might be that traditional PE classes do not always offer students a real workout, particularly in high school. Students don’t like having to change into gym clothes and get sweaty in the middle of the day. So P.E. teachers may end up grading students in part based on whether they change into their P.E. clothes. The 25th Hour PE class at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia is different.

Advocating for Arts in the Classroom

Academic discipline or instrument of personal change?

Academic discipline or instrument of personal change?

A Language Arts Curriculum for Students in Jail

In “School on the Inside: Teaching the incarcerated student,” just posted on the Ed Next website, David Chura writes about teaching language arts for 10 years in a New York county penitentiary. Chura is the author of I Don’t Wish Nobody to Have a Life Like Mine: Tales of Kids in Adult Lockup. While the […]

When Schools Shun Competition, Middle Class Families Seek It Out After School

June Kronholz writes that the self-esteem movement in the 1990s made many educators squeamish about competi­tion. In fact, American educators have had a love/hate relationship with it over the past century. But what we have seen is that as schools move away from promoting competition, those parents who think schools are not providing enough competitive outlets go outside of the traditional education system.

By Guest Blogger Hilary Levey    Blog, Curriculum, Editorial  

Edutopia: Inside George Lucas’ Quixotic Plan to Save America’s Schools

It was just about a year ago that I first started paying attention to Edutopia. They’ve been around for years, but they weren’t on my radar screen. Then suddenly, they wouldn’t stay off it. You couldn’t listen to the radio without hearing their ubiquitous underwriting credit on NPR, with its sublimely confident tagline “What Works in Public Education.”

By Guest Blogger Robert Pondiscio    Blog, Curriculum, Editorial  

E.D. Hirsch, Cultural Literacy and American Democracy

In a new book, The Making of Americans, E.D. Hirsch explicitly connects the idea of cultural literacy to the subject of civics—“the role of a common system of public schools in educating a citizenry to the level necessary to maintain a democracy.”

High School 2.0

Can Philadelphia’s School of the Future live up to its name?

Can Philadelphia’s School of the Future live up to its name?

By Dale Mezzacappa    Curriculum, Features, Homepage, On Top of the News, Technology  

Finding Time for Tennis and Thoreau

My online education

My online education

By Brett Ellen Keeler    Briefs, Curriculum, School Life, Technology  

Book Excerpt: Richard Whitmire Reads from Why Boys Fail

Ed Next is teaming with authors of newly released books to provide 15-minute audio excerpts from those books for your listening pleasure. First up, Richard Whitmire, author of Why Boys Fail, reads from the introduction of his book. You can listen to the excerpt from the book through your computer’s speakers or download the excerpt […]

Can Tracking Improve Learning?

Evidence from Kenya

Evidence from Kenya

By Esther Duflo, Pascaline Dupas and Michael Kremer    Curriculum, Features, Research, Teachers and Teaching  

Return of the Thought Police?

The history of teacher attitude adjustment

The history of teacher attitude adjustment

By Laurie Moses Hines    Curriculum, On Top of the News, Research  

Book Alert: Intelligence and How to Get It

There is no end to the debate over intelligence. The latest book-length entry into this debate is University of Michigan psychology professor Richard Nisbett’s “Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count.”

Florida’s Online Option

Virtual school offers template for reform

Virtual school offers template for reform

E Pluribus Unum?

Two longtime school reformers debate the merits of a national curriculum

Two longtime school reformers debate the merits of a national curriculum

Happy T-1 Peoples Day

Controversies surrounding the celebration of Columbus Day raise a number of interesting questions. Unfortunately, many of the new answers offered are at least as simplistic and historically false as the established answers they are meant to replace.

Does Teaching More Science Content Produce Better Scientists?

A new study does not demonstrate what the authors believe it demonstrates: that teaching more science content leads only to more content knowledge, not to higher-level science competence.

If Students Are Career-Oriented, It Doesn’t Show Up in Majors

With all the talk about workplace-readiness in education reform, one would think that students who enter college would look carefully at the coursework that leads to high-paying jobs.

Bahrain, Exeter Offer Clues About the Gender Gap in Math

Why do boys outperform girls in math, especially at the highest levels of math achievement? Two sets of economists released papers this summer examining the size of the gender gap in math achievement and investigating some possible contributing factors.

More and More, School Just Isn’t ‘Meaningful’

Most educators probably aren’t surprised that more than two-thirds of high school seniors don’t recognize the value of what they have to learn.

The College Cruise

The New York Times this week hosted a forum on summer homework, and while I voted “Yea!” many contributors and commenters thought summer homework a terrible intrusion on June, July, and August.

No More Revenge of the Nerds

According to the Wall Street Journal, Texas high school students can now receive additional course credit toward graduation for participation in athletics.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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