The Forgotten Students

Over one million students drop out of college each year, and colleges do little to bring them back.

Evidence-Based Reforms in College Remediation Are Gaining Steam – and So Far Living Up to the Hype

A number of large-scale reforms have given students more options for completing remediation quickly, and more ways to avoid it altogether.

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year

Georgia Tech’s online program is the largest computer-science master’s degree program in the United States—and possibly the world.

In the News: I’d Be an ‘A’ Student if I Could Just Read My Notes

When college professors ban laptops, students complain about hand cramps and an inability to read their own handwritten notes.

An Elite Grad-School Degree Goes Online

Can Georgia Tech’s virtual master’s increase access to education?

Incremental Steps Toward Bold Student Loan Reforms

Congress can take significant steps in the next Higher Education Act toward designing a system that will better serve both borrowers and taxpayers and generate evidence to support bolder policymaking in the future.

Lessons from Chile’s Transition to Free College

Supporters of free college proposals in the U.S. often look to Europe for case studies, but Chile may actually provide a better comparative study.

Simplifying Grants for College Students: Who Wins and Who Loses?

Making federal student aid programs simpler and easier for students to navigate is a key goal of efforts to reauthorize the Higher Education Act .

Consolidation, Collaboration or Closure? How Colleges Stay Alive in 2018

What will 2018 bring? I asked some experts for their best predictions on four key questions.

What We’re Watching: Reauthorizing the Higher Education Act – Financial Aid Simplification and Transparency

At a hearing on student debt held last week by the Senate HELP Committee, Matt Chingos suggested some changes to the way student loans work.

The Looming Student Loan Crisis Is Worse Than We Thought

New data allow for the most comprehensive assessment to date of student debt and default.

Bridging the College Completion Gap with Comprehensive Systems of Support

The Dell Scholars program improves students’ year-over-year college persistence, academic achievement, and bachelor’s degree attainment.

Two Student Loan Studies Everyone Missed

Perhaps these studies went widely unnoticed because they contradict popular narratives about student debt that imply the loan program ought to be more generous and lenient.

College Needs a Rethink

Higher education today gives analysts, policymakers, and critics so much to fret about that we haven’t been paying nearly enough heed to the quality and value of the product itself.

Partisanship and Higher Education: Where Republicans and Democrats Agree

In our most recent public-opinion survey, we find sharp differences between Democrats and Republicans about the value of a bachelor’s degree (as distinct from a two-year associate’s degree).

In the News: Hispanic Dropout Rate Hits New Low, College Enrollment at New High

New data from the Census Bureau show that the high school dropout rate among U.S. Hispanics has fallen to a new low, and that the reduction has come alongside a long-term increase in Hispanic college enrollment.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

Government Accountability Goes Unaccountable: Chilling WGU’s Innovation Engine

The Department of Education’s Office of the Inspector General released a faulty audit of a highly innovative model that complies with both the spirit and letter of the law.

CUNY’s New Approach to Transferring College Credit

An excerpt from Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at the City University of New York

For Better Learning in College Lectures, Lay Down the Laptop and Pick Up a Pen

Step into any college lecture and you’ll find a sea of students with laptops and tablets open, typing as the professor speaks.

EdNext Podcast: Should Laptops Be Allowed in College Classrooms?

Susan Payne Carter talks with Marty West about her new study which found that students whose professors banned laptops and tablets from class outperformed students whose professors allowed the devices.

Free College Is Now Here … Really

For the first time, any student anywhere can take free, top-quality courses online that lead to full academic credit at 2,900 traditional colleges.

EdNext Podcast: Which Parents Want a Four-Year College for their Children?

In the 2017 EdNext poll on school reform, parents were asked whether they would rather send their child to a two-year college, a four-year college, or neither. When respondents are given information about the costs and benefits of the different options, this changes the decisions of some respondents, but not others.

Winners and Losers in President Trump’s Student Loan Plan

President Trump proposed major changes to the federal student loan program in his first budget request to Congress.

Should Congress Take a Page from the Gainful Employment Playbook?

Instead of targeting institutions of higher education, the government should consider targeting individual programs.

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