Higher Ed, Lower Spending

As States Cut Back, Where Has the Money Gone?

EdStat: Parents Pay a Median Price of $8,320 a Year for Eight Hours a Week of Center-Based Care for a Child Under Five Who Does Not Have a Disability

Parents spend more in the Northeast and West and less in the South and Midwest.

The Tax Benefits for Education Don’t Increase Education

Taxpayers have filed for over thirty billion dollars in credits and deductions for college expenses they paid in 2017.

EdStat: According to the 2017 EdNext Poll, 61 Percent of Respondents Support the General Concept of Standards that are the Same Across the States

Far fewer support “Common Core.”

EdStat: The U.S. Federal Government Spends Roughly $26 Billion Annually on Programs and Tax Expenditures to Support the Care and Education of Young Children

But how much are individual households spending to send a child to a center-based program when no one is helping them pay?

EdStat: Over 1,000,000 Students Drop Out of College Each Year

Students who drop out rack up debt without getting the benefits that come with having earned a degree.

What is the Market Price of Daycare and Preschool?

Knowing what families of different income and educational levels are currently paying for daycare can inform policy debates over how much taxpayers should spend to help families afford it.

Straight Up Conversation: Math Guru Richard Rusczyk

Richard Rusczyk is the founder of the Art of Problem Solving (AoPS), a math curriculum and online learning community that supports students who excel in math.

EdStat: On Average, over the Past 10 Years, Teacher Compensation has Increased by 7.8 Percent for Retirement Benefits

During the same period of time, salaries increased by 1.4 percent a year, on average.

The Forgotten Students

Over one million students drop out of college each year, and colleges do little to bring them back.

EdStat: A Study of 639 Charter School Applications in Four States Found That Applications That Included Plans to Hire a Management Organization Were 10 Percentage Points More Likely to Be Approved

Increasingly, single-site charter schools appear to suffer a higher burden of proof to justify their existence, relative to CMOs.

Teachers Have the Nation’s Highest Retirement Costs. But They’ll Never See the Benefits

Teachers can’t buy food, afford child care, or pay their mortgages with the promise of future benefits — especially ones that never come.

Who Is in Special Education and Who Has Access to Related Services?

New Evidence From the National Survey of Children’s Health

Screening for the Strongest Teachers

Katharine Strunk and Paul Bruno find a link between how prospective teachers rate on a tool used to screen them and their later performance on the job.

Evidence-Based Reforms in College Remediation Are Gaining Steam – and So Far Living Up to the Hype

A number of large-scale reforms have given students more options for completing remediation quickly, and more ways to avoid it altogether.

EdStat: 1,700 Students Begin a Computer-Science Master’s Degree Through Georgia Tech’s Online Program Each Year

Georgia Tech’s online program is the largest computer-science master’s degree program in the United States—and possibly the world.

Unpacking Teacher Shortages

States should work with teacher prep programs to produce candidates that are more aligned to their needs.

EdStat: Only 54 Percent of School Principals Rate Their Teachers’ Understanding of How Children Learn as “Moderately” or “Very” Good

Though teachers are required to learn some basic principles of psychology as part of their training, many report that their education is too theoretical.

Teacher Preparation and the Diversity-Validity Dilemma

We are facing some real challenges in obtaining the high-quality, diverse teacher workforce that we need.

In 2015, 14 Percent of U.S. College Students Were Enrolled in Online-Only Programs

Who takes online classes? Does online education simply substitute for in-person education or does it serve students who would not otherwise enroll in an educational program?

Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think

A new proposal for reforming teacher education

EdStat: West Virginia Teachers Secured a 5 Percent Pay Raise by Striking

Maybe we need to rethink how teachers’ pay schedules are structured.

In the News: I’d Be an ‘A’ Student if I Could Just Read My Notes

When college professors ban laptops, students complain about hand cramps and an inability to read their own handwritten notes.

EdNext Podcast: Could Voice-Activated Technology Transform the Classroom?

As the use of smart speakers like Google Home and Amazon Echo becomes widespread in homes, some wonder whether voice-activated technology technology could prove useful in the classroom. Michael Horn joins Marty West to discuss how this might work and what the challenges might be.

EdStat: By 2016, 44 States Had Passed Legislation Mandating Major Teacher Evaluation Reforms

Have these new evaluation systems had a net positive or negative effect on our nation’s schools?

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