Amidst Edtech Horror Stories, Some Blended-Learning Schools Shine

A growing number of examples show that used well, blended learning—and hence education technology—can help boost student achievement in both charter and district school settings.

Montgomery County’s Elementary School Curriculum: Where’s the Beef?

The MCPS curriculum is weak when it comes to content in science and extremely weak in history.

Unions Praise Social Security, But Like Pensions Even More

Public sector unions praise Social Security. Except they don’t want it for all of their workers.

Look to Course Access to Expand Students’ Horizons

Course access is a powerful tool to make particular courses available to students who otherwise wouldn’t be able to take them.

Charter School Teachers Subsidize State Pension Plans

Charter schools and their teachers pay the same high employer and employee contribution rates as all other schools, but higher turnover rates mean their teachers will get much less in return.

How California Superintendents Can Bust Through Policies to Implement Blended Learning

We need more opportunities for education leaders to help their peers with solutions to the problems and barriers they confront as they move toward blended learning.

Administrators Get Disproportionately Large Pensions

The Empire Center and several other organizations have published a database of New York teacher and administrator pensions that lists the pensions and service years of every member.

Is Character Education the Answer?

Developing teenagers’ self-regulation may require something other than parables, slogans, inspirational banners, and encouragement from compassionate teachers.

Classroom Observations Offer Biggest Room for Improvement in Teacher Evaluations

Addressing the design flaws we have identified in teacher evaluation systems will bring districts closer to achieving the primary goal of meaningful teacher evaluation: assuring greater equity in students’ access to good teachers.

Empirical Proof on the Politics of Pensions

Pension benefit increases have been a painless way for politicians from both parties to provide something tangible to powerful interest groups without having to pay the costs immediately.

The First Hard Evidence on Virtual Education

Florida high school students taking Algebra or English I online perform at least as well on state math and reading tests as do students taking the same courses in a traditional format.

A Quick Note to Dana Goldstein About Pensions

No one is seriously advocating for reducing the pensions of any individual teachers or retirees.

The Challenges of AP History: Are You Sure You Want College Credit?

The trickle downward of university curricular mischief into our schools and other institutions continues unabated, and it’s not a problem that the College Board alone can solve.

Connecting the Dots: E. D. Hirsch, Jr., and Common Core

On Politico’s list of fifty “thinkers, doers and dreamers who really matter,” sharing the number eight spot are E.D. Hirsch and David Coleman, the principal author of the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts.

The Inconsistent Implementation of Teacher Evaluation Reforms

Contrary to claims that teacher evaluation reforms are leading to strict, one-size-fits-all policies, data suggests that local districts are implementing state-based teacher evaluation reforms inconsistently.

Who Are Your Teachers? New Technology for Humanity

We are witnessing a particularly exciting breed of edtech that focuses on relationships and networks as much as academic content and assessment.

Ed Next Book Club: Elizabeth Green on Building a Better Teacher

Mike Petrilli interviews Elizabeth Green about her new book on great teaching.

Five Reasons Districts Should Love Course Access

Course Access is still a new policy, but for many students, no matter where they live or what school they attend, it will give them a significantly greater chance to fulfill their potential.

Pre-Kraziness

What is the benefit conferred by preschool if there’s no school after the pre?

The Politics of Teacher Evaluation Formulas

As states revamp their teacher evaluation systems, they continue to search for that magic number: the percentage of a teacher evaluation rating that should be based on student academic performance.

Not Teacher Quality, but Quality Teaching

Any pedagogy, curriculum, approach, or technology has to be within the skills of ordinary teachers to implement well and effectively. If it takes a superstar teacher it’s a nonstarter.

Can We Strike 1-to-1 from the Edu-Dictionary?

A 1-to-1 laptop or iPad roll out is not a new instructional model. Whether a student can or cannot carry a machine around all day tells us little to nothing about a school’s actual pedagogy, about the quality of interactions between students and teachers, or about the rigor of the software programs delivered through those devices.

Americans Stink at Math (But We’re Much Better Now)

Elizabeth Green’s story for Sunday’s New York Times Magazine, “Why Do Americans Stink at Math?” is a must-read. But for all the time Green spends documenting the ways Americans stink at math, she never mentions that we’ve gotten much better.

Rosetta Stone, MegaStudy and Educational Software in Korea

In Korea, where popular teachers become millionaires by broadcasting their lectures online, schools and families are only very slowly warming up to other kinds of online learning.

Teacher Retention and Quality in Tennessee

Some Tennessee districts are much better at retaining highly effective teachers than others.

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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