A Few More Questions for the National History Teacher of the Year

Sara Ziemnik answers some practical questions from teachers about how she teaches history.

Top Charter Networks Turning Attention to Curriculum

Rather than viewing curricular uniformity as a straightjacket, KIPP decided to build a coherent curriculum as a resource for its teachers.

The Power of Teacher Expectations

How racial bias hinders student attainment

When Classroom Technology Impedes Student Learning

Today’s frenzied enthusiasm for computer-assisted “personalized learning” could lead us to charge into some all-too-predictable pitfalls.

Straight Up Conversation: 2017 National History Teacher of the Year Sara Ziemnik

A chat with Sara Ziemnik about teaching history and how to nurture open and respectful debate in an era of polarization and general nastiness.

In the News: ‘Open’ Curricula Offerings Expand to Social Studies

The Core Knowledge Foundation has released a free online social studies curriculum for grades 3 to 5.

Should We Limit “Screen Time” in School?

Debating the wisest use of technology in the classroom

Putting Dialogue over Devices Shapes Mind and Character

As we sober up from the tech-infused party of the past 20 years, we should think about what should come first in our schools: shaping not just our students’ ability to persevere and solve difficult problems but also their character—their empathic connection with others, their capacity to see our shared humanity, and their ability to problem solve with others for a common good.

The Problem Is Wasted Time, not Screen Time

The emerging generation of educational technology has the power to accelerate learning productivity in ways we can scarcely imagine. If we can ensure that students are connected to it through the help of teachers, a natural balance between online and offline experiences will develop.

What We Know About Career and Technical Education in High School

States have been very active in passing laws about CTE. They now need to step up and support research that can help ensure these new initiatives are successful.

In the News: Hispanic Dropout Rate Hits New Low, College Enrollment at New High

New data from the Census Bureau show that the high school dropout rate among U.S. Hispanics has fallen to a new low, and that the reduction has come alongside a long-term increase in Hispanic college enrollment.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

Government Accountability Goes Unaccountable: Chilling WGU’s Innovation Engine

The Department of Education’s Office of the Inspector General released a faulty audit of a highly innovative model that complies with both the spirit and letter of the law.

Big Data Transforms Education Research

Can machine learning unlock the keys to great teaching?

Teachers Unions Blow an Easy Chance to Walk the Walk

Why are the unions not more concerned about a new study finding that 28% of district teachers miss more than ten days of school for personal and sick leave?

Race, Poverty, and Interpreting Overrepresentation in Special Education

Research shows that racial and ethnic minority students are less likely to be identified for special education than white students when you take other student characteristics into account.

Public Schools’ Billion-Hour Teacher Absenteeism Problem

28.3 percent of teachers in traditional public schools miss eleven or more days of school for illness or personal reasons.

CUNY’s New Approach to Transferring College Credit

An excerpt from Pathways to Reform: Credits and Conflict at the City University of New York

How to Avoid Getting Ripped Off by Ed-Tech Vendors

Ten tips for school districts from an industry insider

Educators’ Time Loss and the Invisible Cost of Reform

A survey of school leaders that found they were spending 19 days a year on superfluous paperwork due to the state’s new teacher-evaluation system.

Should Teachers Be Allowed to Promote Commercial Products?

The New York Times ran an interminable front-page piece on Sunday raising doubts about the ethics and propriety of teachers who promote commercial products.

EdNext Podcast: Curriculum Is Key in Louisiana

Robert Pondiscio joins Marty West to discuss the curriculum-driven reform efforts led by the Louisiana Department of Education.

For Better Learning in College Lectures, Lay Down the Laptop and Pick Up a Pen

Step into any college lecture and you’ll find a sea of students with laptops and tablets open, typing as the professor speaks.

The Play’s the Thing

What do students learn from field trips to see live theater? As it turns out, quite a lot.

A Vision for the Future of K-3 Reading Policy – Personalized and Mastery-Based

We need more nimble systems that can accommodate flexible and timely progression decisions based on clear learning objectives, transparent definitions of proficiency and a strong embedded formative assessment system.

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