Reading and Wronging

A review of “Language at the Speed of Sight” by Mark Seidenberg

Measuring Up

Assessing instructor effectiveness in higher education

Time to Help Teachers Generate and Use Their Own Evidence on Digital Tools

Teachers tend to rely on their colleagues for advice. That’s understandable, but it means that teachers have little assurance of a product’s effectiveness.

Rigorous Preschool Research Illuminates Policy (and Why the Heckman Equation May Not Compute)

Let’s avoid big and irrevocable bets on conclusions and recommendations that are far out in front of what a careful reading of the underlying evidence can support.

Time to Connect Professional Development and Teacher Training to Curriculum

Why is it so rare that thoughtfully vetted instructional materials form the foundation of professional learning for teachers?

Why School “Empowerment” Is Tough: United Edition

In too many schools and systems, empowerment tends to feel like an empty phrase.

Lessons From the End of Free College in England

The English experience suggests that making college free is hardly the only way to increase quantity, quality, and equity in higher education.

Boosting Hispanic College Completion

Does high-school recruiting help more students graduate?

Why Do Private School Teachers Have Such High Turnover Rates?

Federal data from NCES offers a potentially surprising revelation: Private school teachers have higher turnover rates than their public school counterparts, and it’s not particularly close.

Making Student Data More Usable: What Innovation Theory Tells Us About Interoperability

Imagine an ideal world in which all student data flows seamlessly and securely between software applications:

Making Equity a First Principle of Personalized Learning

It can be tempting for many to talk about equity as a byproduct of personalized and blended learning, but we need to push on that assumption.

Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

Redshirting may do more harm than good

Curriculum Becomes a Reform Strategy

It’s too soon to declare that curriculum has made its way solidly into the ed-reform arsenal, but the evidence is mounting that it’s entering.

Make Teaching More Doable

Many teachers find themselves on a pathway to burnout, but it doesn’t have to be this way.

What We’re Watching: Improving Federal Student Aid

Earlier this week, Matt Chingos testified at a hearing on “Improving Federal Student Aid to Better Meet the Needs of Students” before the House Subcommittee on Higher Education and Workforce Development.”

EdNext Podcast: Designing a Blended Learning School

What should schools look like in order to succeed with blended learning? Marty West talks with Larry Kearns about how he and his team designed two charter schools to support their blended learning models.

New Blueprints for K–12 Schools

Innovative design supports blended learning

One More Time Now: Why Lowering Class Sizes Backfires

A large-scale reduction requires hiring massively more teachers, dipping deeper and deeper into the applicant pool.

Why the Federal Government Should Subsidize Childcare and How to Pay for It

There is broad public support for more government spending on childcare as long as that spending does not result in another unfunded entitlement that worsens the deficit

EdNext Podcast: Rebooting Professional Development

Can professional development for teachers be personalized? Michael Horn joins EdNext editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss a new way of doing professional development. Teachers identify the skills they want to acquire, receive specialized training, and are certified as having these new competencies, receiving a micro-credential, something akin to a merit badge.

Universities Gone Innovating

Higher education is capable of innovating, but each institution will have to figure out what is right for its circumstance.

Competency-Based Learning for Teachers

Can micro-credentials reboot professional development?

What We’re Watching: Busting the School Bureaucracy

Rick Hess and a panel of expert teachers talk about how teachers can bust out of the “cage” of misguided policies, inattentive administrators, and inadequate funding.

A Cage-Busting Curriculum for Teachers

How teachers can navigate bureaucracy and the shoals of policy in order to make schools and systems more supportive of their work.

Don’t Forget Private, Non-Profit Colleges

The private, non-profit sector may be in a position to contribute even more to the nation’s educational attainment and economic mobility than it currently does.

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