The Importance of a Diverse Teaching Force

Bachelor’s degree completion gaps make it much harder to achieve a teaching force whose diversity mirrors that of the student population.

A Few More Questions for the National History Teacher of the Year

Sara Ziemnik answers some practical questions from teachers about how she teaches history.

The Power of Teacher Expectations

How racial bias hinders student attainment

Straight Up Conversation: 2017 National History Teacher of the Year Sara Ziemnik

A chat with Sara Ziemnik about teaching history and how to nurture open and respectful debate in an era of polarization and general nastiness.

Teachers Unions Blow an Easy Chance to Walk the Walk

Why are the unions not more concerned about a new study finding that 28% of district teachers miss more than ten days of school for personal and sick leave?

Public Schools’ Billion-Hour Teacher Absenteeism Problem

28.3 percent of teachers in traditional public schools miss eleven or more days of school for illness or personal reasons.

Educators’ Time Loss and the Invisible Cost of Reform

A survey of school leaders that found they were spending 19 days a year on superfluous paperwork due to the state’s new teacher-evaluation system.

Should Teachers Be Allowed to Promote Commercial Products?

The New York Times ran an interminable front-page piece on Sunday raising doubts about the ethics and propriety of teachers who promote commercial products.

The Education Exchange: Public Opinion on Teacher Quality

The 2017 Education Next poll asked the public, parents, and teachers what share of teachers at your local public school are excellent, good, satisfactory and unsatisfactory.

Do Principals Really Think All Teachers are Effective?

A new study finds that principals do differentiate their teachers’ performance, but formal personnel ratings don’t reflect this differentiation.

How D.C. Schools Are Revolutionizing Teaching

Teaching has been transformed into a performance-based profession that provides recognition, responsibility, collegiality, support, and significant compensation

In the News: Consumer Agency Condemns Abuses in Loan Forgiveness Program

A report released by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau warns of problems with a federal program that forgives some student loans for people who take public service jobs.

Technology Doesn’t Drive Blended Learning Success … or Does It?

When I observed classrooms and interviewed teachers and administrators, the thing that stood out was high-quality teaching practices, inspired and supported by effective school leadership.

The Tangled World of Teacher Debt

Clashing rules and uncertain benefits for federal student-loan subsidies

Blended Learning’s Unfulfilled Promise: Saving Teachers Time

Here are a few reasons why blended learning may not live up to its time-saving potential.

Teachers Don’t Need to Go It Alone on Personalized Learning

In some school systems, teachers can network and support each other in the effort to radically remake the classroom.

Reading and Wronging

A review of “Language at the Speed of Sight” by Mark Seidenberg

Why School “Empowerment” Is Tough: United Edition

In too many schools and systems, empowerment tends to feel like an empty phrase.

Why Do Private School Teachers Have Such High Turnover Rates?

Federal data from NCES offers a potentially surprising revelation: Private school teachers have higher turnover rates than their public school counterparts, and it’s not particularly close.

Make Teaching More Doable

Many teachers find themselves on a pathway to burnout, but it doesn’t have to be this way.

One More Time Now: Why Lowering Class Sizes Backfires

A large-scale reduction requires hiring massively more teachers, dipping deeper and deeper into the applicant pool.

EdNext Podcast: Rebooting Professional Development

Can professional development for teachers be personalized? Michael Horn joins EdNext editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss a new way of doing professional development. Teachers identify the skills they want to acquire, receive specialized training, and are certified as having these new competencies, receiving a micro-credential, something akin to a merit badge.

Competency-Based Learning for Teachers

Can micro-credentials reboot professional development?

What We’re Watching: Busting the School Bureaucracy

Rick Hess and a panel of expert teachers talk about how teachers can bust out of the “cage” of misguided policies, inattentive administrators, and inadequate funding.

In the News: How Farmers, Engineers, and Artists Are Becoming Substitute Teachers

Substitute teachers are almost always put in sink-or-swim situations. Parachute Teachers is trying to change the way substitutes work.

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