What We’re Watching: Teaching Rich and Poor Alike

Amanda Ripley and Robert Pondiscio discuss whether poor kids should be taught using the same methods as rich kids. This discussion was part of the New York Times’ Cities of Tomorrow event.

EdNext Podcast: Summer Melt — Why College-Bound Kids Don’t End Up in College & How to Help

At least ten percent of students who graduate from high school and plan on going to college never show up on campus in the fall, a phenomenon called “summer melt.” Ben Castleman of the University of Virginia has studied the causes of summer melt and is testing some innovative interventions to help get at-risk students to college.

What We’re Watching: Debate Over Changes to Democratic Platform on Education

At a meeting last weekend, the Democratic Party amended its education platform in a way that amounts to a rejection of the many of the policies of the Obama administration. C-Span broadcast the debate over the changes.

EdNext Podcast: Teachers Unions Around the World

Stanford University’s Terry M. Moe sits down with EdNext editor Marty West to discuss how political debates over education reform have unfolded around the world, with a focus on the role played by teachers unions.

What We’re Watching: Teachers Like Common Core Math. Why Don’t Parents?

On Thursday, July 14 at 4 pm, Fordham will host a discussion of the results of a recent survey that found that, while teachers have begun to embrace Common Core math, parents (as perceived by teachers) seem less enamored.

What We’re Watching: Maps Showing How School Funding Works in Each State

EdBuild has created a website that shows, state-by-state, how schools are funded. (Clicking on the above map will take you to EdBuild’s interactive maps.)

EdNext Podcast: Politicians Taking On Chronic Absenteeism

Leslie Cornfeld, former special advisor to both the Secretary of Education and to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, speaks with Paul E. Peterson about chronic absenteeism and how data can be used to identify kids who are at risk.

EdNext Podcast: Do Vouchers Reduce Incarceration Rates?

Paul E. Peterson speaks with Patrick Wolf of the University of Arkansas about his study finding that students in Milwaukee who received vouchers to attend private schools were 2-5 percentage points less likely to be accused or convicted of crimes than comparable students who attended public schools.

What We’re Watching: Fordham Event on Education Reform’s Common Ground

The Fordham Institute hosted a discussion on Monday, June 20, 2016 about what the education reform community agrees on.

EdNext Podcast: Partisan Politics in Education

Paul Peterson interviews Robert Shapiro, an expert on public opinion, about how the partisan divide in education policy is shifting, as issues of school quality and accountability have produced “conflicted liberals,” at the same time that the presidential election is creating “conflicted conservatives.”

What We’re Watching: Brookings Event on Inequality

On June 8, 2016, Brookings hosted a panel discussion on the topic “Bringing education disparities to the forefront of the political debate.” Among the panelists were Gerard Robinson of AEI, DeRay Mckesson of Black Lives Matter, and Peggy McLeod of La Raza.

EdNext Podcast: How to Tackle Chronic Absenteeism

A report released by the U.S. Department of Education this week finds that 6.5 million students missed at least three weeks of school last year. On this week’s podcast, Bob Balfanz talks with EdNext’s Paul Peterson about the problem of chronic absenteeism.

What We’re Watching: Core Knowledge Performance at Icahn Charter School

At Icahn Charter Schools in the South Bronx, students learn the Core Knowledge curriculum developed by E.D. Hirsch. Here they demonstrate some of the things they’ve learned in an end-of-year Core Knowledge Assembly program.

EdNext Podcast: The Shared Legacy of Bush and Obama in Education Policy

Paul E. Peterson discusses his recent article, “The End of the Bush-Obama Regulatory Approach to School Reform,” with host Marty West.

What We’re Watching: Online Course on Using PISA to Drive Progress

EdPolicy Leaders Online has launched a new online course that will take a close look at PISA data and explore how the data can be used to improve education policymaking in the U.S.

EdNext Podcast: Can Non-Cognitive Skills Be Taught?

Journalist Paul Tough talks with Education Next editor Marty West about his new book, Helping Children Succeed.

What We’re Watching: Match Minis

Match education has produced a series of 3-5 minute videos, Match Minis, to share what they have learned about classroom teaching, teacher training, and more. There are videos for teachers, for teacher coaches, and for school leaders.

EdNext Podcast: How Will Accountability Change Under ESSA?

Randall Reback, professor of economics at Barnard College and Columbia University, talks with EdNext’s Paul Peterson about flexibility for states under the new Every Student Succeeds Act.

What We’re Watching: Middle School Math Competition on ESPN

Earlier this week, top middle-school mathletes competed in the Mathcounts national championship. The final round aired on ESPN3

EdNext Podcast: Free College Tuition: Lessons from Germany

With the prospect of free college tuition attracting many young voters to the candidacy of Bernie Sanders, EdNext’s Paul Peterson talks with Ludger Woessmann of the Ifo Institute in Munich about free higher education in Germany.

What We’re Watching: The Reading Paradox and the ESSA Solution

On Tuesday, May 11, 2016, at 10 am, Fordham will host an event to examine how the Every Student Succeeds Act gives states an opportunity to boost reading comprehension.

What We’re Watching: Personalized Learning Event at Harvard

On Thursday, May 5 at 5:30, the Harvard Graduate School of Education will host an event about a new online personalized learning platform that has been developed by teachers from Summit Public Schools with help from Facebook engineers.

EdNext Podcast: How Much Economic Growth Can We Get If We Improve Our Schools?

Eric Hanushek talks with Paul E. Peterson about the findings of his new study, which calculates the impact we would see on the economy if states improve their schools and students improve their skills.

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