The Education Exchange: Dispelling Myths about CTE

What kind of students choose career and technical education? In this episode, Paul E. Peterson talks with Albert Cheng, the author of a new paper that finds that the students who choose CTE may not be as engaged in their academic courses but have strong non-cognitive skills. Other studies find that CTE may boost attainment and improve labor market outcomes for students.

What We’re Watching: Rural Education in America – Challenges and Promise

On Thursday, December 7, 2017, starting at 9 am, AEI hosts a day-long research conference on rural education.

EdNext Podcast: Why This Mom Sent Her Son to a Chinese School

Lenora Chu, an American journalist, decided to send her son to a local public school when she and her family relocated to Shanghai. In this episode of the podcast, she talks with Marty West about what she learned about the Chinese education system, which is also the topic of her new book, Little Soldiers: An American Boy, A Chinese School, and the Global Race to Achieve.

The Education Exchange: Chris Cerf on a New Chapter for School Reform in Newark

The state of New Jersey is returning to the city of Newark the power to run its school system. Chris Cerf, who served as state superintendent of New Jersey and then district superintendent of Newark, joins Paul Peterson to talk about the changes that have taken place in the Newark school district and what lies ahead.

Last year, EdNext published “Continuing Change in Newark: To Protect Reform, Chris Cerf Builds Collaborative Relationships,” by Richard Lee Colvin.

What We’re Watching: How Did Massachusetts Pull Off Its Educational Miracle?

On December 7, 2017 from 3–5 p.m., Fordham hosts a discussion with David Driscoll, the man behind many of the reforms that led to the Massachusetts Miracle, and the author of a new book, Commitment and Common Sense: Leading Education Reform in Massachusetts.

What We’re Watching: A Little Help Goes a Long Way in Doubling the Community College Grad Rates

Soledad O’Brien reports on the ASAP program, an innovative program of wrap-around support services launched at CUNY.

EdNext Podcast: How Teacher Expectations Directly Impact Students

The expectations teachers have for how far students will go with their education have an impact on how much education those students actually complete. And white teachers have lower expectations for black students than for similarly situated white students.

To better understand these dynamics, Marty West talks with Seth Gershenson about his new study, “The Power of Teacher Expectations: How racial bias hinders student attainment,” co-authored with Nicholas Papageorge.

What We’re Watching: Examining the State Role in Financing Public Schools

On Wednesday, November 29, 2017, the Urban Institute hosted a panel discussion on school finance policies and inequality.

The Education Exchange: How Safe Do Students Feel in School?

Daniel Hamlin talks with Paul E. Peterson about his research on whether there’s any difference in student perception of safety between district and charter schools in Detroit.

What We’re Watching: Better Buses — Three Ways to Improve School Transportation

Bellwether Education Partners believes we need to think differently about school transportation. In this 3-minute video they explain what needs to change.

The Education Exchange: Should Unions Sell Health Care?

Michael Podgursky joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss the role of public sector unions in negotiating and sometimes even selling health care and other benefits to their members.

EdNext Podcast: Local Election, National Setback for School Choice

On election day last week, voters in Douglas County, Colorado elected a slate of school board members who want to undo the reforms embraced by the last board.

Max Eden joins Marty West to discuss the results of the election, and in particular, what they mean for school choice efforts nationwide.

What We’re Watching: Improving Career and Technical Education by Reforming High Schools and Community Colleges

On Wednesday, November 15, 2017 AEI hosted two panel discussions on new ways to prepare students for the world of work.

The Education Exchange: A Master’s Degree from a Top University at a Fraction of the Cost

Josh Goodman of the Harvard Kennedy School sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss a new master’s degree in computer science offered by Georgia Tech. The computer science department, one of the top 10 programs in the country, has set up a flexible, online program for working adults that charges only 1/6 of what an in-person master’s degree costs.

What We’re Watching: Millennials in Ed Reform

As millennials grow up and become parents, find schools for their kids, and move into positions of leadership, what’s apt to change on the education reform front? The Fordham Institute and the Walton Family Foundation are convening a panel to discuss this on November 14 at 4 pm.

What We’re Watching: Outcomes and Challenges in US Cities with Public School Choice

On November 14, the Brown Center at Brookings and CRPE will host two panels on the current state of public school choice in our nation’s cities.

EdNext Podcast: Changing How We Study Summer Learning Loss

David Quinn joins Marty West to discuss how researchers analyze summer learning loss and how it varies by student background.

The Education Exchange: The Impact of School Choice on School District Resources

Martin Lueken of EdChoice and Benjamin Scafidi of Kennesaw State University sit down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss their reasearch on the effect of the Indiana Choice Scholarship Program on school district resources.

What We’re Watching: Dan Willingham on Reading Comprehension

Dan Willingham explains why reading comprehension tests don’t actually test reading comprehension.

EdNext Podcast: The Education of Eva Moskowitz

Eva Moskowitz, the founder of Success Academy Charter Network, joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss her new memoir, The Education of Eva Moskowitz, and the role of charter schools in New York City.

The Education Exchange: Why is Opposition to Charter Schools Growing?

Demand for seats in charter schools remains high among families but public enthusiasm for continued growth of the charter sector seems to be slipping.

Jason Riley, Wall Street Journal columnist and senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss where the opposition to charter schools is coming from.

What We’re Watching: Over a Million Teachers Aren’t Covered by Social Security

Why are so many teachers not covered by social security? The answers are in this explainer created by TeacherPensions.org

EdNext Podcast: Innovative University Gets Yellow Light from DOE

Western Governors University has earned praise for its innovative model of competency-based learning. But the U.S. Department of Education’s Inspector General has called for the government to bar WGU students from federal student aid programs.

In this episode, Michael Horn of the Christensen Institute joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the WGU model and why a government audit found it wanting.

The Education Exchange: Which Voucher Models Should Be Expanded?

Dennis Epple, Professor of Economics at the Carnegie Mellon Tepper School of Business, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss how states can expand their school choice programs, and whether those programs have been effective.

What We’re Watching: A Year of Love and Struggle at Ron Brown College Prep

In August 2016, a new public school opened in Washington, D.C. specifically to meet the needs of boys of color. A three-part audio documentary looks at how things went for the students and the school in its first year.

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