EdStat: The U.S. Federal Government Spends Roughly $26 Billion Annually on Programs and Tax Expenditures to Support the Care and Education of Young Children

But how much are individual households spending to send a child to a center-based program when no one is helping them pay?

EdStat: Only Five of the Country’s 13,600 Districts Have Applied to the Weighted Student Funding Pilot, Part of the Every Student Succeeds Act

Why have only five of the country’s 13,600 districts applied to the weighted student funding pilot, part of the Every Student Succeeds Act?

EdStat: On Average, over the Past 10 Years, Teacher Compensation has Increased by 7.8 Percent for Retirement Benefits

During the same period of time, salaries increased by 1.4 percent a year, on average.

EdStat: West Virginia Teachers Secured a 5 Percent Pay Raise by Striking

Maybe we need to rethink how teachers’ pay schedules are structured.

EdStat: Charter Schools Received $3,509 Less on Average in Annual Funding per Student Than District Schools in 2011

Even though charter schools and district schools receive equal funding from the state, charters generally receive less funding per student.

EdStat: 93 Percent of Charters Opting Out of State Pension Plans Offer an Alternative

When charter schools opt out of state retirement plans, they usually offer their teachers an alternative.

EdStat: States’ Teacher Pension Plans Are Now Underfunded by $500 Billion

States’ teacher pension plans have been managed so poorly that they’re now underfunded by $500 billion.

EdStat: 19 States Permit Charter Schools to Opt Out of State Retirement Plans

In 19 states, charter schools can offer their teachers an alternative to state retirement plans.

EdStat: $1,220 per Pupil Was Spent by School Districts on Teachers’ Pension Benefits in 2017

Pension costs, excluding Social Security and retiree health insurance, have grown from $520 per student in 2004 to $1,220 today.

In the News: How Are Schools Funded and Why Does It Matter?

Marguerite Roza is interviewed by Christine Schneider of the Walton Family Foundation about how school spending is related to efforts to improve schools.

How Progressive is School Funding in the United States?

The fact that overall funding progressivity remains low despite two decades of reforms suggests a troubling lack of progress on equitable funding of public schools.

The Tangled World of Teacher Debt

Clashing rules and uncertain benefits for federal student-loan subsidies

That’s Not Fair!

Students in public charter schools receive $5,721 or 29% less in average per-pupil revenue than students in traditional public schools.

EdNext Podcast: Unmasking School Spending

As of December 2018, school districts nationwide will be required to report exactly what they spend on each of their schools. Will that information kick off a new wave of school finance research and reform? Could it become one of the law’s most important legacies? Marty West discusses the change with Marguerite Roza of Georgetown University.

Charters Must Avoid Recreating the Failed School District Financial Model

It’s troubling to see that many charter schools and CMOs are steadily accumulating fixed costs.

With New Data, School Finance is Coming Out of the Dark Ages

A sleeper provision in the Every Student Succeeds Act will serve up a motherlode of never-before-available school-level financial data.

Why Teachers Need Portable Benefits

Traditional pension benefits aren’t portable. When a teacher moves to a new state, her previous service years don’t automatically rollover for free. Instead, she starts back at zero.

What’s at Stake in the Ongoing Fight About School Spending Comparability?

Today’s dispute over comparability marks the midpoint in a decades-long struggle over whether districts have a right to skimp on funding their most troubled schools.

What Should States Do About School Districts In Financial Trouble?

Communities rarely embrace tough trade-offs. We need to lean on school boards and superintendents to take their fiduciary responsibilities seriously.

School Pension Costs Have Doubled Over the Last Decade, Now Top $1,000 Per Pupil Nationally

Employer pension costs represent a significant drain on resources that might otherwise have been available for classroom expenditures.

Not in the Right Ballpark

A continuation of the debate over a study on the impact of school spending by C. Kirabo Jackson, Rucker C. Johnson, and Claudia Persico

Money Does Matter After All

A response to Eric Hanushek

Money Matters After All?

A response to Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings by C. Kirabo Jackson, Rucker C. Johnson, and Claudia Persico

Boosting Educational Attainment and Adult Earnings

Does school spending matter after all?

Pension Debt Crowds Out Other School Spending in Michigan

In Michigan, school funding has increased, but schools aren’t seeing much of the money. Instead, most of the funding increases are going toward paying off the state’s retirement debt.

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