Conservatives and the Common Core

When a group of state leaders, many of them Republicans, can come together to set expectations for the curricular core that surpass what most of them set on their own, conservatives ought to applaud, not lash out

Will the Assessment Consortia Wither Away?

If ACT and College Board scarf up much state business, there won’t be a lot left for the consortia.

The Right Response to the Atlanta Cheating Scandal

The burden rests on those who want to eliminate testing and accountability to provide assurance that the system won’t revert back to its bad old ways.

The Truth about Common Core

Why are prominent conservatives criticizing a set of rigorous educational standards?

By Guest Bloggers Kathleen Porter-Magee and Sol Stern    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability  

What We’re Watching: StudentsFirst’s 2013 State Policy Report Card

Eric Smith, Tom Luna, Ulrich Boser and Rick Hess discuss the grades given to the 50 states by StudentsFirst in its state policy report card.

Can Bad Schools Be Good For Neighborhoods?

Might there be compelling civic or social reasons for keeping open persistently failing or unsafe inner-city schools?

The Common Core Implementation Gap

A new report on state-level implementation of Common Core merits some attention—but less for its top-line findings and more for how it confirms what I’m now calling the “Common Core Implementation Gap.”

It Can Be Done

Charter successes show how all schools might improve

A review of Born to Rise, by Deborah Kenny, and Mission Possible, by Eva Moskowitz and Arin Lavinia

Science Standards 2.0

If states are going to make rational decisions to replace their own science standards with these new ones, it’s only right to insist that the new ones be stronger

By Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Kathleen Porter-Magee    Blog, Editorial, Standards, Testing, and Accountability  

Revelations from the TIMSS

Half or more of student achievement gains on NAEP are an illusion

Half or more of student achievement gains on NAEP are an illusion

The Seattle MAP Flap

Teachers of Seattle’s Garfield High School are “boycotting” the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessment, which is required by the district, though the MAP is precisely the type of “good” assessment that many educators claim to favor.

We Know the Answer, But What Is the Question?

We cannot paper over the fact that a large number of other countries have shown that it is possible to develop considerably higher skills in their youth than we are doing

Reform Agenda Gains Strength

The 2012 EdNext-PEPG survey finds Hispanics give schools higher grade than others do

The 2012 EdNext-PEPG survey finds Hispanics give schools a higher grade than others do

How the Common Core Changes Everything

Implementation, done right, must be comprehensive. Which means what?

Is the U.S. Catching Up?

International and state trends in student achievement

International and state trends in student achievement

Florida Defeats the Skeptics

Test scores show genuine progress in the Sunshine State

Test scores show genuine progress in the Sunshine State

What We’re Watching: Does it Matter That the U.S. is Not Catching Up?

Paul Peterson and Eric Hanushek discuss their new report, which finds that the gains made by students in the U. S. are only middling compared to the gains being made by students in other countries.

Do We Need National Standards to Prevent a Race to the Bottom?

If a race to the bottom is fueled by the desire to satisfy federal bureaucratic rules, why would we think the solution is in the adoption of more federal bureaucratic rules?

International Benchmarking of Student Achievement

Most educational standard setting, performance assessment, and judgments about appropriate levels of achievement today are based on history and custom with a little bit of “professional dreaming.” The process generally lacks any context of what our international competitors are doing.

Is the Common Core Just a Distraction?

All of the intense pushing and shoving about the Common Core leaves one simple question: should we care?

We Don’t Judge Teachers By Numbers Alone; The Same Should Go For Schools

Why not add a human component to the process, via school inspectors like those in England?

The War Against the Common Core

It will be ironic as well as unfortunate if the Common Core ends up in the dustbin of history as a result of actions and comments by its supporters. But in March 2012 there can be little doubt that the strongest weapons in the arsenal of its enemies are those that they have supplied.

What We’re Watching: Teacher Test Scores Go Public

Eric Hanushek talks with the Wall Street Journal about why teachers’ value-added scores should be made public.

Common Core Quality Debated

If they agree that Common Core is sort of mediocre, why does Wilson support them while Wurman oppose them?

The Test Score Hypothesis

Student achievement matters a lot. But does it matter the most?

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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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