Education Policy Under Donald Trump

What will education policy look like under a Trump administration? Education Next editors and contributors offer their thoughts.

In the News: Protesters Interrupt NAACP Board Meeting in Cincinnati

On Saturday, the national board of the NAACP ratified a resolution adopted this summary calling for a moratorium on charter school expansion.

Massachusetts Charter Cap Holds Back Disadvantaged Students

This November, Massachusetts voters will go to the polls to decide whether to expand the state’s quota on charter schools.

In Schools, Teacher Quality Matters Most

Today’s research reinforces Coleman’s findings

Today’s research reinforces Coleman’s findings

Non-Cognitive Measures Not Ready for Accountability

Non-cog or character skills are incredibly important but if we are going to use these and other ideas to improve education, we are going to need a significant shift toward funding research and greater patience to bring those ideas to fruition.

So Far Only Ohio is Backing Off A High Standard for Proficiency

Outside of Ohio, most states are living up to their commitments to provide more honest information to parents. A key promise of the Common Core is being kept.

EdNext Podcast: Arne Duncan’s Legacy

Michael B. Horn and Paul E. Peterson discuss Arne Duncan’s decision to resign and what his legacy will be as Secretary of Education.

Charter Schools: Taking Stock

It’s time to review the progress of the charter movement and the challenges that lie ahead, what we’ve done right as well as where we’ve gone astray..

What the Republican Presidential Contenders Should Be Saying About Education

On Wednesday, Campbell Brown and the American Federation for Children will host an education policy summit in New Hampshire with at least six of the GOP presidential contenders. Here’s what I hope they will say.

Good News for New Orleans

Early evidence shows reforms lifting student achievement

Early evidence shows reforms lifting student achievement

Public Supports Testing, Opposes Opt-Out, Opposes Federal Intervention

If those in our nation’s capital want to modify federal education policy along lines preferred by the public at large, they will enact a law that resembles the bipartisan bill passed by the Senate.

The Contours of a Deal on ESEA Are In Sight

What will survive, what will be eliminated, and what’s still up in the air

Faith, Hope, and Hard Work: Reflections on Year One of Partnership Schools

June marked the end of my first year as superintendent of Partnership Schools, a nonprofit school management organization that was granted broad authority to manage and operate six K–8 urban Catholic schools.

A Checklist for Fixing ESEA

Things are moving rapidly here in DC. Yesterday, on a 218-213 vote, the House narrowly passed the Student Success Act.

Summer School is Coming, Get Parents Involved

Parents who are given actionable feedback on how their kids are doing in summer school are more likely to talk with their kids and their kids are more likely to earn course credit.

Big Impact: Supreme Court Housing Decision Could Have Significant Effect on Education

The education community should be watching to see how the Supreme Court rules on a housing case from Dallas which considers whether plaintiffs can bring “disparate impact” claims under the Fair Housing Act (FHA).

Want More College Graduates? Improve Our K–12 System

We have already closed the gap between college readiness and college attainment.

Four Lessons from the Opt-Out Debate

It’s still too soon to gauge whether the opt-out movement is a true groundswell of opposition, a union-driven blip on the radar, or something in between.

Education Savings Accounts Turn 5 Years Old

Some 3,000 students in Arizona and Florida are now using education savings accounts, more than half of them children with special needs.

Memo to Teachers’ Unions: Now Might Be a Good Time to Start Panicking

In Friedrichs, ten California teachers are arguing that agency fees (combined with onerous “opt-out” procedures) violate their rights to freedom of speech and association

Backfilling Charter Seats: A Backhanded Way to Kill School Autonomy

I respect schools that welcome students at any grade when space opens up, but whether to do this should remain the prerogative of the school, not the state or its regulators.

Fixing No Child Left Behind: Oral Testimony of Martin West

Congress should maintain the law’s current annual testing requirements while restoring to states virtually all decisions about the design of their accountability systems.

Testing, Testing 1-2-3

Ending statewide, comparable, annual testing is an overreaction that creates more problems than it solves.

School Vouchers Help Low-Income Minority Students Earn a College Degree

For the first time, we are able to show that vouchers may have a long-term positive impact on college graduation rates.

Common Core Standards Aren’t So Easy To Replace

For all the hoopla, just a handful of states have proposed significant changes to Common Core, and none of them has written higher standards.

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