Behind the Headline: Virginia Gov. Robert Mc­Don­nell vetoes P.E. bill

Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell vetoed a bill that would have required elementary and middle school students to participate in at least 150 minutes of physical education each week. A study that was published in Ed Next in 2006 found that mandating more time in PE classes does not always result in more exercise for kids.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Ed Next Book Club

In-depth interviews by Mike Petrilli with authors of new and classic books about education.

Behind the Headline: Detroit Plan Makes Big Charter School Bet

In a bid to prevent massive school closings, Detroit will consider converting nearly a third of its district-run schools into charter schools. In an article that appeared in the Spring 2008 issue of Ed Next, Andy Smarick urged charter school advocates to embrace a strategy of large-scale replacement of failing district schools with charter schools.

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Behind the Headline: Cuts to Head Start Show Challenge of Fiscal Restraint

Republicans are pushing to cut the budget for Head Start by $2 billion. The program is popular, but studies have raised questions about its effectiveness. The current budget for the program is $7.2 billion. An article by Ron Haskins that appeared in the Winter 2004 issue of Ed Next looked at earlier efforts to reform Head Start.

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Behind the Headline: Gates Says Benefits Costs Hit Schools

Bill Gates will outline how flawed pension accounting hampers the ability of states to pay for education, and will call for states to rethink their pension systems, in a talk to be presented at the TED conference tomorrow. Gates has created a website that shows the funding status for pension obligations and retiree health-care benefits for each state. In the Spring 2009 issue of Ed Next, Mike Podgursky and Bob Costrell wrote about the high cost of teacher pensions.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Full-Time E-Learning Not Seen as Viable Option for Many

In Ed Week, Michelle Davis describes what the school day is like for parents whose children attend virtual school full-time. (Hint: it’s a lot of work!) In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Bill Tucker wrote about Florida Virtual School, which offers supplemental courses to students attending brick-and-mortar schools but also allows students to enroll in an online school full-time.

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A Battle Begun, Not Won

The following essay is part of a forum, written in honor of Education Next’s 10th anniversary, in which the editors assessed the school reform movement’s victories and challenges to see just how successful reform efforts have been. For the other side of the debate, please see Pyrrhic Victories? by Frederick M. Hess, Michael J. Petrilli, […]

Pyrrhic Victories?

The following essay is part of a forum, written in honor of Education Next’s 10th anniversary, in which the editors assessed the school reform movement’s victories and challenges to see just how successful reform efforts have been. For the other side of the debate, please see A Battle Begun, Not Won by Paul E. Peterson, […]

Behind the Headline: Whittle Starts A City School

Edison Schools co-founder Chris Whittle has announced that he will open a for-profit, elite private school in New York City in September 2012. A study by Matt Chingos and Paul Peterson that was published in Ed Next in 2009 looked at what happened when for-profit firms, including Edison Schools, were given control of some public schools in Philadelphia.

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Behind the Headline: GWU launches online prep school

In partnership with K12.com, George Washington University has launched a high school that will operate entirely online. In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Bill Tucker wrote about Florida Virtual School, which offers supplemental courses to students attending brick-and-mortar schools but also allows students to enroll in an online school full-time.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Can Rhee’s reforms work without Rhee’s toughness?

In the Washington Post this weekend, Richard Whitmire worries that the race to embrace a style of school reform he calls “Michelle Light” — the kinds of teacher quality reforms identified with Michelle Rhee, but pursued in a gentle, cooperative way–may not be able to accomplish much. Rhee was profiled by June Kronholz in the Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Why Teacher Pensions Don’t Work

In the Wall Street Journal, Joel Klein argues that the structure of traditional pensions discourages talented young people from becoming teachers. The Winter 2010 issue of Ed Next included a study by Bob Costrell and Mike Podgursky that showed how teacher pensions concentrate benefits on teachers who spend their entire careers in a single state, penalizing younger teachers, who change jobs and move more often than did previous generations.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Poll: Predictions for 2011

What will 2011 bring to the world of education reform? Vote now for the two developments you think are most and least likely

Behind the Headline – Detroit Public Schools: 40,000 kids to get laptops from stimulus funds

Detroit Public Schools will spend $49 million in federal stimulus funds to buy laptops for 40,000 students in grades 6-12.  In the Fall 2004 issue of Ed Next, Rick Hess wrote about other attempts by states and districts to boost achievement by passing out laptops. ” The tendency,” he noted, “has been to sprinkle computers and Internet connections across classrooms in the pleasant hope that teachers will integrate them into their lessons.”

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Poll: Best and Worst Developments for K-12 Education

New Ed Next Readers Poll: Vote now on the best and worst events in 2010 for education.

Behind the Headline: Tough as Nails, but Always Ready for a Bearhug

At De La Salle Academy, a private school in New York City for high-performing low-income children profiled in today’s New York Times, rules are strict and expectations are high, but the school becomes like a family for students. An article by David Whitman that appeared in the Fall 2008 issue of Ed Next explored the phenomenon of paternalistic schools, “highly prescriptive institutions that teach students not just how to think, but also how to act according to what are commonly termed traditional, middle-class values.”

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Blending Computers Into Classrooms

Barbara Martinez of the Wall Street Journal visits a Bronx elementary school where students spend two hours per day engaged in computer-directed instruction.  In the Summer 2009 issue of Ed Next, Gerald Huff and Bror Saxberg imagined what computer-assisted learning might look like in 2025 and described some ways that technology is being used to customize learning today.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Chicago Public Schools CEO Ron Huberman to step down

Ron Huberman, who was appointed Chicago Schools CEO by Mayor Richard Daley after Arne Duncan became Secretary of Education, has told Mayor Daley that he will leave his position before the mayor leaves office in May rather than serve under another mayor, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. In the Winter 2003 issue of Ed Next, Alexander Russo wrote about the early days of mayoral control of education in Chicago.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: KIPP leaders unworried by test score drop

Fifth grade test scores are down at KIPP schools in Washington, DC, but KIPP leaders are not concerned, and the network is continuing to add schools and grade levels, reports Jay Mathews. In Spring 2009, Ed Next published an excerpt from Jay’s book about KIPP, Work Hard. Be Nice.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Making Math Lessons as Easy as 1, Pause, 2, Pause …

Winnie Hu writes in the New York Times about school districts adopting Singapore Math, which is thought to provide a better foundation for higher-order math skills by teaching fewer topics but in more depth. Barry Garelick investigated Singapore Math in the Fall 2006 issue of Ed Next.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Ed Next Poll: Top Books of the Decade

Please vote for the top three books of the decade.

Behind the Headline: Hurricane Katrina swept away years of dysfunction in New Orleans public schools

Five years after Hurricane Katrina hit, Cindy Chang of the New Orleans Times Picayune describes the transformation that has taken place in the city’s school system. In the Fall 2006 issue of Ed Next, Kathryn Newmark and Veronique de Rugy wrote about the changes that were underway.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

The 2010 Education Next-PEPG Survey

Complete Results

Complete Results

Behind the Headline: Unions Lose Election Bid

In New York, a judge has rejected a demand by the teachers union that the union be allowed to spend significantly more money on a Senate race than is permitted under the state’s current campaign finance law. In an article that appears in the Fall 2010 issue of Ed Next, Mike Antonucci took a close look at campaign spending by teachers unions.

By Education Next    Web-Only  

Behind the Headline: Unions’ Tactics Diverge in Engaging Obama Agenda

In Ed Week, Stephen Sawchuk looks at how the NEA and the AFT are responding to the reforms being advanced by the Obama administration, and at what might explain the different responses from the two unions. In the Winter 2009 issue of Ed Next, Linda Seebach wrote about the two teachers unions, which had just chosen new presidents at their national conventions.

By Education Next    Web-Only  
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The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

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