In the News: The Real Threat to Common Core May Come Not From a Trump White House but From Many Statehouses



By 11/16/2016

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Donald Trump pledged during his campaign to eliminate the Common Core state standards, but many have noted that Common Core is not an issue President Trump will have any say over, as academic standards are now under the firm control of the states.

ednext-nov2016-blog-ototn-common-core-trump-statesIn an article for The 74, Matt Barnum writes that

The biggest threat to the academic standards — which seem to be constantly under siege, but which have proved surprisingly resilient — comes with a number of state-level results.

Education Week reports that 36 states have kept the Common Core intact. Moreover, some states that have “rewritten” the standards have replaced the Common Core with something substantially similar.

But the success of anti–Common Core candidates in multiple states suggests the standards may be at risk — although it’s not clear how much power or desire these politicians will have to repeal Common Core.

In the article, Barnum goes on to review the results of state elections that may have an impact on the Common Core.

An article in the Fall 2016 issue of Education Next, “The Politics of the Common Core Assessments,” by Ashley Jochim and Patrick McGuinn, looks at political pressures within the states that are affecting state involvement with the standards and tests.

– Education Next




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