Education Next Issue Cover

Fall 2003 / Vol. 3, No. 4

The Near End of Bilingual Education

In the wake of California’s Prop 227

By CHRISTINE H. ROSSELL  
Features  

Ignorance and Confidence

Mark Twain once said, “To succeed in life, you need two things: ignorance and confidence.” Despite the irony, Twain may have been on to something when it comes to standards-based education reform. Ignorance and confidence were about all I had going for me when I was elected to serve as president of the Virginia Board […]

By KIRK T. SCHRODER  
Features  

Sensitivity Training

The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn

by Diane Ravitch

By REVIEW by NATHAN GLAZER  
Features  

Progressively Worse

Getting It Wrong from the Beginning: Our Progressivist Inheritance from Herbert Spencer, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget

by Kieran Egan

By LYNNE V. CHENEY  
Books, Reviews  

Amrein and Berliner defend their study; so does the AFT

One would think that economist Michael Podgursky ("Fringe Benefits," Check the Facts, Summer 2003) would analyze teachers' salaries through the lens of supply and demand.

By Education Next  
Features  

Let’s Not Play Favorites

Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the city of Cleveland’s school voucher program constitutional because it took a neutral stance toward religion. Both religious and secular schooling options were available to parents. Now the political and legal struggle shifts to the states, where opponents of vouchers are pinning their hopes on the so-called Blaine […]

By The Editors  
From the Editor  

Critical Demagogues

To the egoistic and asocial being that has just been born, [society] must, as rapidly as possible, add another, capable of leading a moral and social life. Such is the work of education. -Emile Durkheim, 1911 “Critical pedagogy,” a body of education theory represented by the writings of Henry Giroux, Peter McLaren, Michael Apple, and […]

By MARTIN ROCHESTER  
Features  

Tug of War

A fierce debate over civic education in America’s public schools has erupted in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Broadly speaking, liberal approaches to civic education have emphasized the need to resist jingoism and to explore why America induces such hatred in certain parts of the world. By contrast, conservative responses to […]

By JAMES B. MURPHY  
Character Education, Research  

The Politics of No Child Left Behind

The scene in January 2002 was a civics text come to life. Flanked by jubilant members of Congress and standing in front of a cheering crowd, President George W. Bush declared the start of a “new era” in American public education with the signing of the No Child Left Behind Act. The new law represented […]

By ANDREW RUDALEVIGE  
Features, No Child Left Behind, State and Federal  

Puzzled States

In January 2002, President George W. Bush signed a comprehensive revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. Known popularly as the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act and passed with strong bipartisan support in Congress, this new legislation promises an important shift in efforts at all levels to improve the quality of […]

By GARY W. RITTER & CHRISTOPHER J. LUCAS  
Features, No Child Left Behind  

Disabling the SAT

The College Board undermines its premier test


The Neutrality Principle

Joshua Davey was once intent on becoming a minister, a plan that cost him his publicly funded scholarship to Northwest College. Now the plaintiff in a high-profile case before the Supreme Court, Davey decided to attend Harvard Law School upon graduating from Northwest. The law regarding vouchers is in the midst of fundamental change. About […]

By JAMES E. RYAN  
Courts and Law, Features, School Choice  

The Power to Perform

Attracting nontraditional leaders to education will require increasing their authority and compensation, conditioned on getting results

By THE THOMAS B. FORDHAM INSTITUTE & the BROAD FOUNDATION  
Forum  

Out with the Old

University-based school administration programs are incoherent, undercapitalized, and disconnected from the districts where graduates are most likely to seek employment. There is much to be learned from the way business and the military train their leaders

By  
Forum  

Lifting the Barrier

Eliminating the state-mandated licensure of principles and superintendents is the first step in recruiting and training a generation of leaders capable of transforming America’s schools


Who Should Lead?

Most states require that school principals and superintendents be licensed. To earn a license, they must take courses in administration at a college of education. Are these rules really necessary? Clearly, nothing is more critical to a school’s success than the ability of the principal to establish a sense of mission, set goals, and motivate […]

By Education Next  
Forum  

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