Education Next Issue Cover

Spring 2004 / Vol. 4, No. 2

A Kibbutz Education

The collective farm was a powerful educational tool

By AMITAI ETZIONI  
Features  

Book Alert

Doing Our Own Thing: The Degradation of Language and Music and Why We Should, Like, Care by John H. McWhorter (Gotham Books) “We must have the attitude that every child in America, regardless of where they’re raised or how they’re born, can learn,” President George W. Bush once observed. The president talks funny. So do […]

By Education Next  
Books  

Just the Facts

School Figures: The Data Behind the Debate
by Hanna Skandera and Richard Sousa
Hoover Institution, 2003, $15; 342 pp.


Uncivil War

California Dreaming: Reforming Mathematics Education by Suzanne M. Wilson Yale University Press, 2003, $29.95; 320 pages. Reviewed by Ralph A. Raimi California’s “math wars,” the struggle over what is sometimes called the “new New Math,” illustrate all the ills and disagreements that have plagued American education for the past century. They have been but a […]

By RALPH A. RAIMI  
Reviews  

Teachers Unions

The Worm in the Apple: How the Teacher Unions Are Destroying American Education by Peter Brimelow HarperCollins, 2003, $24.95; 320 pages. As reviewed by George Mitchell Peter Brimelow aims high. In The Worm in the Apple, he seeks to emulate The History of Standard Oil, the legendary effort by Ida Tarbell that helped to usher […]

By George Mitchell and Julia E. Koppich  
Reviews, Unions and Collective Bargaining  

Rod Paige on teachers who cheat; the benefits of inclusion

It is shameful that a small minority of teachers feel the need to help their students cheat on tests. The issue says something larger about our society that is very hard to fathom and is simply unacceptable.

By Rod Paige  
Features  

Tough Love

The value of high grading standards


Voucher Research Controversy

New looks at the New York City evaluation


The Open Classroom

Like automotive models, women’s hemlines, and children’s toys, pedagogical fads come and go, causing an immediate stir but rarely influencing teaching practice in any significant way. The notion that every innovation dreamed up by reformers inside and outside public schools makes its way into the nation’s classrooms is popular among those hunting for reasons to […]

By Larry Cuban  
Features  

The Gentleman’s A

New evidence on the effects of grade inflation


The Race Connection

Are teachers more effective with students who share their ethnicity?


A Building Need

Charter schools in search of good homes

By KIM SMITH & JAMES WILLCOX  
Features  

The Sun Sets on the West

Social studies, the politically correct way

By JONATHAN BURACK  
Features  

A Board’s Eye View

Lessons from life in public office


Exploring the Costs of Accountability

No Child Left Behind is no unfunded mandate


Faulty Engineering

The diversity of values within American society renders public schools ill-equipped to produce the engaged citizens our democracy requires


Crafting Good Citizens

Public schools can —and should— teach students to become active participants in democratic life

By STEPHEN MACEDO  
Features  

Teaching Citizenship

Can public schools teach good citizenship?

By Education Next  
Features  

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