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What We’re Watching: Are State Proficiency Standards Falling?

On Tuesday, May 22, Education Next presented the results of its latest evaluation of the rigor of state proficiency standards at an event hosted by the Hoover Institution.


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What We’re Watching: Are State Proficiency Standards Falling?

On Tuesday, May 22, Education Next presented the results of its latest evaluation of the rigor of state proficiency standards at an event hosted by the Hoover Institution.

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EdNext Podcast: Motivating American Students to Work Harder

In the United States, we don’t expect most kids to work very hard, and they don’t. So write Mike Petrilli and Adam Tyner of the Fordham Institute in a new EdNext article about student motivation. Should we try to make schools more engaging? Use external exams to hold students accountable for their learning? Adam Tyner sits down with Marty West to discuss some options that he and Mike Petrilli explore in their article, “The Case for Holding Students Accountable.”

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Learning from the International Experience: Conference Photos

In August 2011, Education Next and the Program on Education Policy and Governance co-hosted a conference to examine whether U.S. students are ready to compete in a global economy.

Video Archive

What We’re Watching: Are State Proficiency Standards Falling?

On Tuesday, May 22, Education Next presented the results of its latest evaluation of the rigor of state proficiency standards at an event hosted by the Hoover Institution.


What We’re Watching: School Funding – Stories from the States

On Wednesday, May 30, 2018, the Urban Institute will host a panel discussion on how states can make changes to their school funding systems.


What We’re Watching: Learning from the Long-Term Effects of School Choice in America

The Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard hosted a conference last month on the long-term effects of choice.


What We’re Watching: Beyond the Classroom

The Education Without Walls program run by the National Center for Outdoor and Adventure Education gives chronically homeless students in North Carolina the chance to learn from outdoor experiences like camping trips.


What We’re Watching: NAEP, A Nation at Risk, and the Future of Education Reform

On April 25, 2018, the Hoover Institution, the Fordham Institute, and Education Next hosted a panel discussion on the progress ed reform has made since the 1980s and what the latest NAEP scores suggest about America’s future.



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Podcast Archive

EdNext Podcast: Motivating American Students to Work Harder

In the United States, we don’t expect most kids to work very hard, and they don’t. So write Mike Petrilli and Adam Tyner of the Fordham Institute in a new EdNext article about student motivation. Should we try to make schools more engaging? Use external exams to hold students accountable for their learning? Adam Tyner sits down with Marty West to discuss some options that he and Mike Petrilli explore in their article, “The Case for Holding Students Accountable.”

By 05/23/2018

The Education Exchange: Understanding the Social Aspect of Truancy

Schools are paying increasing attention to the problem of truancy, and many states are including an indicator measuring chronic absenteeism in their accountability plans for the Every Student Succeeds Act. In this episode, Paul E. Peterson talks with Peter Bergman about the phenomenon of joint absences, when students have a peer with whom they systematically skip class.

By 05/21/2018

EdNext Podcast: The Trouble with Ranking Teacher-Prep Programs

For a brief period, states were required to rank their teacher education programs based in part on how much their graduates were boosting student test scores. But when Paul von Hippel and Laura Bellows took a close look at the evaluations of teacher education programs in six states, they found that the differences between the programs in their graduates’ impact on student learning were negligible.

By 05/16/2018

The Education Exchange: When For-Profit Colleges Lose Access to Federal Aid

The Trump administration may undo regulations that punish for-profit colleges if their graduates are unable to earn enough money to repay their student loans. The authors of a new study discuss the impact on student enrollment in for-profit colleges and community colleges when the federal government cracks down on for-profit colleges with high rates of students defaulting on their loans.

By 05/14/2018

EdNext Podcast: When Benefit Costs Rise, Teacher Salaries Bear the Brunt

In many states, teacher pay has stagnated or even declined in recent years. The rising cost of maintaining teacher retirement systems is part of the problem. Chad Aldeman joins Marty West to discuss the increasing cost of teacher benefits, how this affects teacher take-home pay, and what teachers gain and lose under the current system.

By 05/09/2018

The Education Exchange: Phonics Makes a Comeback in England

A little over a decade ago, a new government in the United Kingdom issued a report recommending that early reading instruction include phonics. What has been the impact of that change in approach to teaching reading?
Martina Viarengo, the author of a study on this topic, joins Paul Peterson to discuss her research.

By 05/07/2018

EdNext Podcast: Changes in State Spending on Higher Ed

The cost of college is rising, in part because of declines in state support for higher education. But what explains those declines?

Douglas Webber, associate professor in the Temple University Department of Economics, joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss his article, “Higher Ed, Lower Spending: As States Cut Back, Where Has the Money Gone?”

By 05/02/2018

The Education Exchange: Effects of Refugee Students on Non-Refugee Students

After a devastating earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, thousands of Haitians moved to the U.S. and enrolled their children in school here. David Figlio, Dean of the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss his research on the impact these Haitian refugee students had on the non-refugee students who were already attending those schools.

By 04/30/2018

EdNext Podcast: A More Diverse Charter Sector

As the charter school sector grows, there is more emphasis on replicating school models with a track record of success and less emphasis on single-site schools that increase the variety of schooling options. So argues Derrell Bradford in a new article for Education Next, “Strengthening the Roots of the Charter-School Movement.”

This week, Derrell Bradford joins EdNext editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss his article, what can be done to support single-site schools, and why it matters.

By 04/25/2018

EdNext Podcast: Teacher Education Reboot – An Expert Proposal

Do teachers know enough about how students think and what motivates them? Daniel Willingham thinks that ed schools are not giving teachers enough useful information about how children learn. He laid out his argument in an Education Next article, “Unlocking the Science of How Kids Think.”

By 04/18/2018

The Education Exchange: New Research on the Impact of Teachers

Instead of just looking at the effect teachers have on the test scores of their students, researchers have expanded their focus to include the impact of teachers on student attendance and the long-run outcomes of their students. Seth Gershenson joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss the latest findings on the impact teachers have on their students.

By 04/16/2018

EdNext Podcast: A Lost Decade for U.S. Education?

The results of the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress have just been released and the news is not good. National trends are mostly flat, and as Mike Petrilli notes, it’s now been almost a decade since we’ve seen strong growth in either reading or math, with the slight exception of eighth grade reading. Mike Petrilli joins Marty West to take a close look at the results and to consider what lessons we can draw from them.

By 04/11/2018

The Education Exchange: Studying a Large-Scale Voucher Program in Colombia

In Colombia, a voucher program has awarded over 125,000 poor children scholarships to help them attend private high schools. Eric Bettinger of Stanford University talks with Paul Peterson about the program, which has been found to have positive long-term impacts on participating students, including better labor market outcomes.

By 04/09/2018

EdNext Podcast: One University Enters Innovative New Territory in Online Learning

Georgia Tech already offered a highly regarded master’s degree in computer science. In 2014, the school added a fully online version of the degree. In this episode, Josh Goodman joins Marty West to discuss the impact of the program.

By 04/04/2018

The Education Exchange: Checking In on Support for Charter Schools

Results from a survey released last week showed that support for charter schools has come back up after a sharp drop last year. In this week’s episdode, Nina Rees of the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss what might have caused support for charters to dip and then rise and to consider the results of some recent studies on charter schools.

By 04/02/2018

EdNext Podcast: Charter Schools and Teacher Retirement Benefits

In some states, charter schools can design their own retirement plans for teachers. In this episode, Michael Podgursky, professor of economics at the University of Missouri–Columbia, joins Marty West to discuss what we can learn from charter innovation in this area.

By 03/28/2018

The Education Exchange: Looking Beyond Test Scores

School choice researchers are finding that vouchers may impact student test scores and later attainment outcomes in different ways. In this episode, Patrick Wolf joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss why researchers should consider other outcomes besides test scores when evaluating school choice programs.

By 03/26/2018

EdNext Podcast: Could Voice-Activated Technology Transform the Classroom?

As the use of smart speakers like Google Home and Amazon Echo becomes widespread in homes, some wonder whether voice-activated technology technology could prove useful in the classroom. Michael Horn joins Marty West to discuss how this might work and what the challenges might be.

By 03/21/2018

The Education Exchange: Latino Views on Politics and Education

In this episode, David L. Leal, professor at the University of Texas, sits down with Paul E. Peterson to discuss how Latinos vote, what Latinos think of their kids’ schools, and whether the views of Latinos differ significantly from the views of other Americans.

By 03/19/2018

EdNext Podcast: A Reformer’s Legacy in New Mexico

“As public education secretary of New Mexico, Hanna Skandera dug in fast, set an ambitious agenda, and broke a lot of china.” So writes Michael McShane in a new article for Education Next about Skandera’s seven years of leadership. Michael McShane joins Marty West to discuss the lessons education reformers can learn from Skandera’s successes and challenges.

By 03/14/2018

The Education Exchange: The Long-term Effects of Voucher Programs

Three new studies released by the Urban Institute look at how private school choice has affected nearly 13,000 students in three different states.

Matt Chingos of the Urban Institute joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss what we’re learning about how school choice participants do when it comes to college enrollment and graduation.

By 03/12/2018

EdNext Podcast: 50 Year Old Curriculum Still Works

A new meta-analysis documents a half-century of “strong positive results” for Direct Instruction. Robert Pondiscio of the Fordham Institute joins Marty West to talk about Direct Instruction, which he calls “the Rodney Dangerfield of education. It gets no respect.”

By 03/07/2018

The Education Exchange: The ABCs of School Choice

Paul DiPerna, the vice president of research and innovation for EdChoice, joins Paul E. Peterson to discuss “The ABC’s of School Choice,” a comprehensive guide to school choice programs in the U.S.

By 03/05/2018

EdNext Podcast: Oral Arguments Heard by Supreme Court in Janus v. AFSCME

Josh Dunn, an associate professor of political science at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, joins EdNext Editor-in-chief Marty West to discuss the Supreme Court’s oral arguments on Janus v. American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees.

By 02/26/2018


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Photo Archive

Learning from the International Experience: Conference Photos

In August 2011, Education Next and the Program on Education Policy and Governance co-hosted a conference to examine whether U.S. students are ready to compete in a global economy.

By 12/02/2011

School Advocacy Groups

Additional images of school advocacy groups from Education Reform Now, Parent Revolution, and Stand for Children. For more on school advocacy groups see “Not Your Mother’s PTA” by Bruno V. Manno. Education Reform Now Parent Revolution Stand for Children

By 10/26/2011

Performance Learning Centers

Photos: Additional images of Performance Learning Centers (PLCs) in Hampton and Richmond, VA.

By Education Next 08/11/2011

Hybrid Schools

Photos: Additional images of the Denver School of Science and Technology, High Tech High in San Diego, Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary School in San Jose, and School of One in New York City.

By Education Next 03/15/2011

Catalyst Schools

Photos: Additional images of the Catalyst Schools in Chicago.

By Education Next 02/25/2011


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