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What We’re Watching: What Will the 2016 Election Mean for Education?

On Thursday, November 10, AEI held a panel discussion on how the results of the election will affect federal and state education policies.


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What We’re Watching: What Will the 2016 Election Mean for Education?

On Thursday, November 10, AEI held a panel discussion on how the results of the election will affect federal and state education policies.

Podcast

EdNext Podcast: School Suspensions and Teacher Race

Students of color are suspended more often than their white peers, but the rates of suspension and expulsion change when students have a teacher of the same race.

Photos

Learning from the International Experience: Conference Photos

In August 2011, Education Next and the Program on Education Policy and Governance co-hosted a conference to examine whether U.S. students are ready to compete in a global economy.

Video Archive

What We’re Watching: What Will the 2016 Election Mean for Education?

On Thursday, November 10, AEI held a panel discussion on how the results of the election will affect federal and state education policies.


What We’re Watching: American Public Opinion on K-12 Education Policy

On September 16, Education Next hosted an event to discuss the results of its 10th annual survey of public opinion on K-12 education.


What We’re Watching: Jeb Bush at Harvard

On October 13, Governor Jeb Bush spoke at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) Askwith Forum on new opportunities for state leadership on K-12 education policy


What We’re Watching: Charter Schools at Twenty-Five: Humdrum or Revolutionary?

On Wednesday, October 12, Fordham hosted a discussion on the state of charter schooling. Chester E. Finn, Jr. and Richard Whitmire spoke about what has been accomplished, what has been learned, and what the future may hold.


What We’re Watching: Building a Learning Culture in America

On Tuesday at 10 am, AEI will host a conversation between Gerard Robinson and Kevin Chavous about Chavous’s new book, Building a Learning Culture in America.



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Podcast Archive

EdNext Podcast: School Suspensions and Teacher Race

Students of color are suspended more often than their white peers, but the rates of suspension and expulsion change when students have a teacher of the same race.

By 12/07/2016

EdNext Podcast: Charter Schools for the Preschool Set

Why has it taken so long for charter schools to start serving kids younger than kindergarten?

By 11/30/2016

EdNext Podcast: Will New Orleans’ Education Reforms Stick?

The governing arrangements that made New Orleans a darling of education reformers will soon be a thing of the past. Is this the beginning of the end of the nation’s most promising experiment in non-traditional education governanace?

By 11/16/2016

Trumpcast: What does Trump’s Victory Mean for Education Policy?

Education Next’s Paul E. Peterson and Martin West talk about what education reforms they expect from President-Elect Donald Trump. Will he move on school choice, the Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights, Title I portability, charter schools, or something entirely unexpected?

By 11/10/2016

EdNext Podcast: Why Do Field Trips Matter?

Randomized experiments that send some students to visit art musuems and live theater performances find that these field trips help children develop critical thinking skills and values like empathy.

By 11/02/2016

EdNext Podcast: Will Open Educational Resources Disrupt the Textbook Industry?

Teachers can now access a wealth of free resources online—from one image to a whole curriculum. But the growing reliance on open educational resources raises questions—who will produce them, how will they be compensated, how will educators be able to find the best ones, and how will all this affect the market for textbooks?

By 10/26/2016

EdNext Podcast: Test Prep or True Learning?

There’s plenty of evidence that students attending “no excuses” charter schools can do extremely well on standardized tests, but do the benefits of this approach to education extend beyond test scores?

By 10/19/2016

EdNext Podcast: What Does the Research Say about School Discipline Policies?

Minority students are more likely to be suspended or expelled from school. What does the research say about the consequences of exclusionary discipline policies and alternatives to it?

By 10/12/2016

EdNext Podcast: Jeb Bush on Fixing School Accountability

Under ESSA, states have new freedom to design their own accountability systems for schools. Will they innovate or will they retreat from real accountability?

By 10/05/2016

EdNext Podcast: What Will the Election Mean for Charter Schools?

What voters decide on November 8 will matter for education policy in general and school choice especially. Will federal support for charter schools continue? Will charter schooling remain a bipartisan issue? Who will win the battle over lifting the charter cap in Massachusetts?

By 09/28/2016

EdNext Podcast: Should Massachusetts Allow More Charter Schools?

In November, voters will have a chance to weigh in directly on the state’s charter school policy. Should they vote to allow more charter schools? Which direction does the evidence point?

By 09/21/2016

EdNext Podcast: Bill de Blasio’s Strategy for Fixing New York City’s Public Schools

When Mayor Bill de Blasio took office in 2014, he launched several new programs to boost student achievement in New York City schools. Has he succeeded in crafting a progressive alternative to predecessor Michael Bloomberg’s “education reform” agenda?

By 09/14/2016

EdNext Podcast: Should School Start Later?

Now that summer vacation is over, American students are trading sleeping in for morning alarms. Are early start times a mistake? Would students perform better in school if classes started later?

By 09/07/2016

EdNext Podcast: What Does The Public Think About Policies Affecting Teachers?

Should teachers be paid more? Should it be harder for teachers to get tenure? Are teacher evaluation systems working?

In this episode of the EdNext podcast, Paul E. Peterson and Martin West take a close look at the differing views of teachers, parents, and the general public on polices that affect teachers, based on data from 2016 EdNext survey.

By 08/31/2016

EdNext Podcast: A Closer Look at Public Opinion on School Reform

The just-released 2016 Education Next poll identified changes in public support for the Common Core, testing, opting out, and school choice. Paul Peterson and Marty West discuss what the public says it wants and why these opinions are changing.

By 08/24/2016

EdNext Podcast: Will Virtual Reality Be Just Another Classroom Fad?

Using inexpensive new technology, students can take virtual reality field trips without leaving their classrooms. What will schools, teachers, and curriculum developers need to do for virtual reality to live up to the hype? In this episode of the EdNext podcast, Marty West talks with Michael Horn, whose article, “Virtual Reality Disruption: Will 3-D technology break through to the educational mainstream?” appears in the Fall 2016 issue of Education Next.

By 08/17/2016

EdNext Podcast: Are Minority Students Actually Underrepresented in Special Ed?

It is widely believed that minority students are overrepresented in special ed programs, possibly due to racial bias. But controlling for other factors that might put students at risk for problems at school, Paul Morgan and George Farkas find that minority students are actually less likely to receive special ed services than similarly situated white students.

By 08/10/2016

EdNext Podcast: Common Standards without Common Tests

The Common Core standards initiative was launched in 2009 but by the time new tests aligned with those standards were rolled out 4 to 5 years later, there was mounting opposition to using those tests to evaluate teachers and schools. To preserve support for the standards, many states began throwing the assessments overboard. Will abandoning the tests in order to save the standards actually work?

By 08/03/2016

EdNext Podcast: Will Leaked Plans to Boost L.A. Charter Schools Harm Them Instead?

Los Angeles has over 41,000 students on charter school wait lists. But when the school district and teachers union got wind of the Broad Foundation’s plan to help launch schools to serve those students, simmering tensions over charter school expansion exploded.

By 07/27/2016

EdNext Podcast: Summer Melt — Why College-Bound Kids Don’t End Up in College & How to Help

At least ten percent of students who graduate from high school and plan on going to college never show up on campus in the fall, a phenomenon called “summer melt.” Ben Castleman of the University of Virginia has studied the causes of summer melt and is testing some innovative interventions to help get at-risk students to college.

By 07/20/2016

EdNext Podcast: Teachers Unions Around the World

Stanford University’s Terry M. Moe sits down with EdNext editor Marty West to discuss how political debates over education reform have unfolded around the world, with a focus on the role played by teachers unions.

By 07/13/2016

EdNext Podcast: Politicians Taking On Chronic Absenteeism

Leslie Cornfeld, former special advisor to both the Secretary of Education and to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, speaks with Paul E. Peterson about chronic absenteeism and how data can be used to identify kids who are at risk.

By 06/29/2016

EdNext Podcast: Do Vouchers Reduce Incarceration Rates?

Paul E. Peterson speaks with Patrick Wolf of the University of Arkansas about his study finding that students in Milwaukee who received vouchers to attend private schools were 2-5 percentage points less likely to be accused or convicted of crimes than comparable students who attended public schools.

By 06/22/2016

EdNext Podcast: Partisan Politics in Education

Paul Peterson interviews Robert Shapiro, an expert on public opinion, about how the partisan divide in education policy is shifting, as issues of school quality and accountability have produced “conflicted liberals,” at the same time that the presidential election is creating “conflicted conservatives.”

By 06/15/2016

EdNext Podcast: How to Tackle Chronic Absenteeism

A report released by the U.S. Department of Education this week finds that 6.5 million students missed at least three weeks of school last year. On this week’s podcast, Bob Balfanz talks with EdNext’s Paul Peterson about the problem of chronic absenteeism.

By 06/08/2016


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Photo Archive

Learning from the International Experience: Conference Photos

In August 2011, Education Next and the Program on Education Policy and Governance co-hosted a conference to examine whether U.S. students are ready to compete in a global economy.

By 12/02/2011

School Advocacy Groups

Additional images of school advocacy groups from Education Reform Now, Parent Revolution, and Stand for Children. For more on school advocacy groups see “Not Your Mother’s PTA” by Bruno V. Manno. Education Reform Now Parent Revolution Stand for Children

By 10/26/2011

Performance Learning Centers

Photos: Additional images of Performance Learning Centers (PLCs) in Hampton and Richmond, VA.

By Education Next 08/11/2011

Hybrid Schools

Photos: Additional images of the Denver School of Science and Technology, High Tech High in San Diego, Rocketship Mateo Sheedy Elementary School in San Jose, and School of One in New York City.

By Education Next 03/15/2011

Catalyst Schools

Photos: Additional images of the Catalyst Schools in Chicago.

By Education Next 02/25/2011


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