No Child Left Behind and Testing Help Hold Schools Accountable



By 02/25/2015

1 Comment | Print | NO PDF |

The controversial education law known as No Child Left Behind is up for reauthorization, and amid the nuances under debate one question stands out: Will pressures from the left and right force the federal government to abandon its annual, statewide testing requirements?

When enacted into law in 2002, NCLB had widespread, bipartisan backing including support from President George W. Bush and Sen. Edward “Ted” Kennedy . Nonetheless, it had numerous creaky provisions, not least of which were the testing provisions that held schools accountable for student achievement.

Its measure of whether a school was failing was too bizarre for most people to understand and placed schools with the most challenged students at a disadvantage. Other mandates were equally meaningless. Giving students at failing schools a choice among other schools in their district simply shuffled children around the city. Requiring after-school programs did nothing to improve the school day itself.

All such provisions were potentially up for revision in 2007, but Congress couldn’t agree on how to bring the law up to date. As a fix, Obama’s education secretary, Arne Duncan, waived for most states the law’s most onerous provisions. Still, the administration continues to support testing every student in math and reading in grades three through eight and again in high school.

Continue reading this in the Los Angeles Times

– Paul E. Peterson




Comment on this article
  • Michael Umphrey says:

    But accountable to the wrong people–or, more accurately, agencies.

  • Comment on this Article

    Name ()


    *

         1 Comment
    Sponsored Results
    Sponsors

    The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

    Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

    Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

    Sponsors