The Importance of a Diverse Teaching Force

Bachelor’s degree completion gaps make it much harder to achieve a teaching force whose diversity mirrors that of the student population.

New Evidence That Students’ Beliefs About Their Brains Drive Learning

Experimental research has found that developing a growth mindset can improve academic achievement and that schools can affect students’ mindset.

State Plans Under the Every Student Succeeds Act: Where Is the Research?

State plans mostly ignored research on what works and what does not to achieve particular outcomes.

Online Schooling: Who Is Harmed and Who Is Helped?

A review of studies that measure the causal impact of online courses.

Will Tax Reform Provide More Support for Children and Their Families? Follow the Money

Plans for federal tax cuts and reforms need to be fleshed out in ways that provide greater benefits for children in families most in need.

The Pell Grant Proxy: A Ubiquitous But Flawed Measure of Low-income Student Enrollment

Policymakers use the Pell Grant program to measure the share of low-income students enrolled at specific universities, but the reliability of this measure is rarely scrutinized.

What We Know About Career and Technical Education in High School

States have been very active in passing laws about CTE. They now need to step up and support research that can help ensure these new initiatives are successful.

Thinking “Beyond the Box”: The Use of Criminal Records in College Admissions

The overlap in the population between those applying to college and those with a criminal record is bigger than many realize,

Race, Poverty, and Interpreting Overrepresentation in Special Education

Research shows that racial and ethnic minority students are less likely to be identified for special education than white students when you take other student characteristics into account.

Summer Learning Loss: What Is It, and What Can We Do About It?

Many students start the academic year with achievement levels lower than where they were at the beginning of summer break.

For Better Learning in College Lectures, Lay Down the Laptop and Pick Up a Pen

Step into any college lecture and you’ll find a sea of students with laptops and tablets open, typing as the professor speaks.

Winners and Losers in President Trump’s Student Loan Plan

President Trump proposed major changes to the federal student loan program in his first budget request to Congress.

Chronic Absenteeism: An Old Problem in Search of New Answers

Roughly 14 percent of students nationwide miss at least 18 days of school.

Some Schools Much Better Than Others at Closing Achievement Gaps Between Their Advantaged and Disadvantaged Students

Policymakers should pay much closer attention to the practices of individual schools rather than concentrating exclusively on policies and interventions typically enacted at the district level.

More Findings About School Vouchers and Test Scores, and They are Still Negative

Four recent rigorous studies—in the District of Columbia, Louisiana, Indiana, and Ohio—used different research designs and reached the same result.

How State ESSA Accountability Plans Can Shine a Statistically Sound Light on More Students

Pooling data across years and grades may provide an opportunity to include students in accountability systems in cases where subgroup size is otherwise too small.

Federal Work-Study: Past Its Prime, or Ripe for Renewal?

The Trump administration seeks to cut funding for the Federal Work-Study program by nearly 50 percent, from $990 million to $500 million, and to reform the program.

How Progressive is School Funding in the United States?

The fact that overall funding progressivity remains low despite two decades of reforms suggests a troubling lack of progress on equitable funding of public schools.

Promises and Pitfalls of Online Education

Online courses for college students can improve access, yet they also are challenging, especially for the least well-prepared students.

The Disinvestment Hypothesis: Don’t Blame State Budget Cuts for Rising Tuition at Public Universities

Surprisingly, researchers and the media have demanded very little evidence before concluding that state funding cuts are causing tuition to rise.

Start High School Later for Better Academic Outcomes

Changing school start times could boost learning at a very low cost.

By   05/30/2017 Blog, Editorial  

What We Don’t Know About High Schools Can Hurt Us

There are few studies going on about effective approaches for helping students graduate.

By   05/22/2017 Blog, Editorial  

How is Policy Affecting Classroom Instruction?

If greater attention is not paid to supporting teachers to implement new standards and reduce coverage of deemphasized content, the standards may not have much effect.

Rigorous Preschool Research Illuminates Policy (and Why the Heckman Equation May Not Compute)

Let’s avoid big and irrevocable bets on conclusions and recommendations that are far out in front of what a careful reading of the underlying evidence can support.

Lessons From the End of Free College in England

The English experience suggests that making college free is hardly the only way to increase quantity, quality, and equity in higher education.

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