The Top Twitter Feeds in Education Policy 2014



By 08/06/2014

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It’s August, which can only mean one thing: it’s time for our annual list of top education-policy Twitter feeds. (Click for the 2013, 2012, and 2011 versions.) Klout scores are the primary metric (with ties broken by the number of Twitter followers); a main focus on K–12 education policy is the only eligibility requirement.

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See this list on Twitter

This year’s list is remarkably consistent with last year’s (and the years’ before that), though a couple of newcomers might be an indication of the changing education-policy debate. The Badass Teachers Association is on the board at number 15, and its founder, Mark Naison, is at number 21. And news anchor-turned-education-reformer Campbell Brown jumps to Twitter prominence at number 24. (Keep in mind that Klout looks at all forms of social media; some of the feeds on our list are particularly strong on Facebook, for example, not just Twitter.)

Of course, the list above mixes apples and oranges—both people and organizations. In many respects, it’s easier as a person to achieve a higher Klout score, which offers big points for “engagement.” (Few organizational feeds will get into a Twitter debate.) On the other hand, many of the feeds have huge numbers of followers that are hard for real live people to replicate. So let’s deconstruct this fruit salad and look at people and organizations separately.

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See this list on Twitter

Here the list starts to look more interesting, with more newcomers on the charts. Chalkbeat’s Elizabeth Green is no doubt helped by timing (her new book, Building a Better Teacher, is getting buzz at just the right moment for this exercise). Vox’s Libby Nelson has built a strong following and receives high marks for engagement. And USC assistant professor Morgan Polikoff edges his way onto the list too—a source of pride for the Fordham/AEI Emerging Education Policy Scholars program.

How about organizations and media outlets?

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See this list on Twitter

There are more newbies on this list too, including the Network for Public Education and the education programs of two big Washington think tanks (AEI and CAP). When I look at the list I think, “Yup, those are most of the big players in the education policy debates today.” But who’s missing?

As always, I’m sure I’ve overlooked someone. Tell me at @michaelpetrilli, and I’ll update the list if appropriate. And by doing so, you’ll help to boost my Klout score!

—Mike Petrilli




Comment on this article
  • Jill W. says:

    Just curious. How does American Federation for Children rate a nod? What about @ILRaiseYourHand which has 3,224 followers and over 22,000 tweets? They have an active private Facebook group (not a page) but don’t have it connected on Klout, leaving their influence solely measured by Twitter. As well, can you/do you differentiate between orgs that use sponsored tweets and orgs that don’t?

  • Jill W. says:

    Or @ParentsUnitedPA with > 4000 followers and 15,000 tweets?

  • xian says:

    Yeah, under your methodology Michael, you might want to look at Helen’s page: @parentsunitedPA and don’t forget @chrislehmann.

    I believe that Parents United PA would be the only grassroots parent group on the list.

  • Sue Roffey says:

    This seems to be all the US – do you have info on Europe or Australia?

  • Gene V Glass says:

    You can buy Twitter followers. Everybody knows that.

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