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Standards, Testing, and Accountability

Accountability was widely embraced as a reform strategy in the 1990s, but skepticism has grown about whether the approach is working. Amid mounting evidence that state-level accountability systems have been built on wildly differing expectations for student performance, there has been increased interest in the development of common academic standards that could be adopted by all 50 states.

Recent Topics

School Policy

EdNext Podcast: ESSA — What You Need to Know

The Every Student Succeeds Act, the federal education law passed in 2015, is part of what would seem to be a dying breed: major pieces of domestic policy legislation passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. How did ESSA come to be? And what does it mean for American students?

Inside Schools

What We’re Watching: Busting the School Bureaucracy

Today (Thursday) at 4 pm, Rick Hess and a panel of expert teachers will talk about how teachers can bust out of the “cage” of misguided policies, inattentive administrators, and inadequate funding.

Government and Politics

Making Evidence Locally

Rethinking education research under the Every Student Succeeds Act

Government and Politics

Making Evidence Locally

Rethinking education research under the Every Student Succeeds Act

How the U.S. Department of Education Can Foster Education Reform in the Era of Trump and ESSA

By shining a spotlight on states with particularly low student performance, the department can bring attention to the struggles facing public education in these states.

A Weak SIG-nal: Subpar Research Design Means We Don’t Really Know if SIG Worked

Even if SIG achieved the same effects as urban charter schools the study may not have been able to detect these effects.

Strange Days, My Friend

I don’t know what comes next, but we’ll all be well-served to keep our wits about us.

The Teacher Evaluation Revamp, In Hindsight

What the Obama administration’s signature reform got wrong

Inside Schools

What We’re Watching: Busting the School Bureaucracy

Today (Thursday) at 4 pm, Rick Hess and a panel of expert teachers will talk about how teachers can bust out of the “cage” of misguided policies, inattentive administrators, and inadequate funding.

A Cage-Busting Curriculum for Teachers

How teachers can navigate bureaucracy and the shoals of policy in order to make schools and systems more supportive of their work.

Don’t Forget Private, Non-Profit Colleges

The private, non-profit sector may be in a position to contribute even more to the nation’s educational attainment and economic mobility than it currently does.

EdNext Podcast: Will Students with Disabilities Receive Meaningful Benefits?

On January 11, 2017 the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the most important special education case in thirty-five years, Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. At issue was the level of services federal law requires school districts to provide students with disabilities. Marty West discusses the case with Josh Dunn, Ed Next’s legal beat columnist.

In the News: How Farmers, Engineers, and Artists Are Becoming Substitute Teachers

Substitute teachers are almost always put in sink-or-swim situations. Parachute Teachers is trying to change the way substitutes work.

School Policy

EdNext Podcast: ESSA — What You Need to Know

The Every Student Succeeds Act, the federal education law passed in 2015, is part of what would seem to be a dying breed: major pieces of domestic policy legislation passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. How did ESSA come to be? And what does it mean for American students?

Making ESSA Work in the States

States and school districts may find it tricky to navigate what is required and how money can be spent, which can lead to funds being used in “safe” and “permissible” ways rather than the ways that educators deem most useful.

The Long Path to ESSA

An excerpt from “The Every Student Succeeds Act: What It Means for Schools, Systems, and States”

More Money or More Charter Schools?

Letting great educators open up schools is much more cost effective than increasing spending by billions of dollars, which will yield very modest results.

Making Sense of ESSA’s New ‘Direct Student Services’

Direct Student Services gives states new leeway to use some of their federal Title I dollars to expand instructional choice for students.

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