Featured Topic

Standards, Testing, and Accountability

Accountability was widely embraced as a reform strategy in the 1990s, but skepticism has grown about whether the approach is working. Amid mounting evidence that state-level accountability systems have been built on wildly differing expectations for student performance, there has been increased interest in the development of common academic standards that could be adopted by all 50 states.

Recent Topics

School Policy

Ten Things To Know About The CCSSO-CGCS Testing Plan

The organization of state superintendents and the organization of big urban school districts will work together to audit the number and types of tests administered and develop new systems that are leaner and more integrated.

Inside Schools

Teachers Would Prefer Cash

A common perception about how we pay public sector workers is fundamentally flawed.

Government and Politics

What the 2014 Senate Elections Might Mean for Education

If the Republicans take the Senate, Senator Lamar Alexander would take the helm of the Senate HELP Committee, which is a big deal.

Government and Politics

What the 2014 Senate Elections Might Mean for Education

If the Republicans take the Senate, Senator Lamar Alexander would take the helm of the Senate HELP Committee, which is a big deal.

New OCR Guidance on Equitable Resources: A Godsend for Charter Schools?

I’d love to see charter associations ask OCR to investigate states that don’t do enough to provide equitable funding to charter schools serving high proportions of poor and minority children.

Behind the Headline: How the Education Spendthrifts Get Away With It

In an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal, Paul Peterson looks at why it is so popular for politicians to call for more spending on schools.

Where Does Government Education Research Really Come From?

When Congress convenes in lame-duck status between November and January, taking up the future of NCES would be timely.

Demonstrate College Readiness If You Want a Federal Grant or Loan

Before receiving a federal grant that never needs to be repaid (as is the case with Pell grants and some loans), the recipient should demonstrate that they are worthy of support by passing an appropriate set of examinations.

Inside Schools

Teachers Would Prefer Cash

A common perception about how we pay public sector workers is fundamentally flawed.

School Reform, Philadelphia Style

On Monday, the Philadelphia School Reform Commission shocked the city by announcing that it would unilaterally cut health care benefits to city teachers rather than continue to negotiate with the teacher’s union.

How To Kill Reading Achievement

Complaints about close reading bother me less than its potential overuse, or the creeping notion that close reading is what all reading instruction should look like under Common Core. That would be bad for the standards, and even worse for reading achievement in the U.S.

Behind the Headline: Parent Says No Mush For His First-Grader

In his column, Jay Mathews highlights a blog entry by Mike Petrilli about the weak, content-free curriculum being taught to his first grader in the Montgomery County, Md. public schools.

Teach for America’s Retirement Gap

While most TFA teachers may not realize it, almost all are losing out on retirement benefits for their time in the classroom.

School Policy

Ten Things To Know About The CCSSO-CGCS Testing Plan

The organization of state superintendents and the organization of big urban school districts will work together to audit the number and types of tests administered and develop new systems that are leaner and more integrated.

Let’s Tell the Truth: High-Stakes Tests Damage Reading Instruction

It’s long past time to recognize that reading tests don’t measure what we think they do.

Teachers Would Prefer Cash

A common perception about how we pay public sector workers is fundamentally flawed.

The Twenty-Five Richest Elementary Schools in the Richest Region of the Country

At one elementary school, the average income is almost $250,000 per year. Is this school really more “public” than an inner-city Catholic school serving poor minority children? The public spends $12,000 per child on the former and $0 per child on the latter. Tell me again why that’s fair?

A Bad Idea Whose Time Has Come

Before we retreat to the pre-NCLB era of grade-span testing or revert to some other testing-light position, let’s at least recall some of the benefits of annual testing of all kids.

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