Featured Topic

Standards, Testing, and Accountability

Accountability was widely embraced as a reform strategy in the 1990s, but skepticism has grown about whether the approach is working. Amid mounting evidence that state-level accountability systems have been built on wildly differing expectations for student performance, there has been increased interest in the development of common academic standards that could be adopted by all 50 states.

Recent Topics

School Policy

Squeezing the Public School Districts in Louisiana

Governor John Bel Edwards recently cut funding of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP), claiming that it was necessary to save money.

By Guest Blogger

Inside Schools

What Does it Mean to ‘Raise the Bar’ for Entry Into the Teaching Profession?

Policymakers have few useful tools to screen out “bad” teachers from the profession. The current screening tools are doing little more than unnecessarily limiting the supply of new teachers.

Government and Politics

Title I Flexibility and Micro ESAs

Instead of continuing with a complex and ineffective maze of Title I regulations, states should have the opportunity to let parents decide how to use Title I dollars.

Government and Politics

Title I Flexibility and Micro ESAs

Instead of continuing with a complex and ineffective maze of Title I regulations, states should have the opportunity to let parents decide how to use Title I dollars.

ESSA Didn’t Settle Federal Education Policy. Far From It.

Our next President will be forced to make a number of important education policy decisions almost immediately upon taking office.

What’s at Stake in the Ongoing Fight About School Spending Comparability?

Today’s dispute over comparability marks the midpoint in a decades-long struggle over whether districts have a right to skimp on funding their most troubled schools.

Could ESSA Spark an Overhaul of How We Fund Schools?

Three provisions in the new law might help states and school districts improve their systems of school finance.

Proposed ESSA Regulations Limit States on Accountability

Like No Child Left Behind, the proposed ESSA regulations are going to stand in the way of some promising approaches to state accountability. What’s the point of that?

Inside Schools

What Does it Mean to ‘Raise the Bar’ for Entry Into the Teaching Profession?

Policymakers have few useful tools to screen out “bad” teachers from the profession. The current screening tools are doing little more than unnecessarily limiting the supply of new teachers.

A Strong Case for a Knowledge-Centric Curriculum

Why Knowledge Matters, E. D. Hirsch, Jr.’s fifth book on education, is as important as his first.

As Google Steals its Education Thunder, What Can Microsoft Do?

It would be great to see Microsoft focus on three things that will transform our education system into a more student-centered one.

The Many Ways Teacher Diversity May Benefit Students

At least three distinct theories have been proposed about how moving away from a majority-white teacher workforce would be beneficial for students of color.

The Wrong and Right Ways to Ensure Equity in IDEA

Are U.S. schools over-identifying children for special ed based on their race or ethnicity? The best-available studies find that the opposite is occurring.

By Guest Bloggers and

School Policy

Squeezing the Public School Districts in Louisiana

Governor John Bel Edwards recently cut funding of the Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP), claiming that it was necessary to save money.

By Guest Blogger

ESSA Didn’t Settle Federal Education Policy. Far From It.

Our next President will be forced to make a number of important education policy decisions almost immediately upon taking office.

Arizona’s First Audit of Education Savings Accounts is Instructive

Education Savings Accounts have gained popularity among supporters of parental choices in education, and lawmakers in four other states have enacted laws similar to Arizona’s since 2011.

By Guest Blogger

California’s Too-Colorful Accountability Plan

California’s new accountability system for schools and districts is complicated beyond imagining and does not lend itself to useful interpretation by parents, taxpayers, voters, or policymakers.

Summative Ratings Are All Around Us. Why Are We Afraid of Them in K-12 Education?

Cars, colleges, neighborhoods, restaurants, you name it — if there’s some sort of choice that people can make, there’s probably a rating system to help them decide.

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