Why Is Race to the Top Rewarding States With Low Proficiency Standards?



By 05/03/2010

Print | NO PDF |

Education Next’s Paul Peterson and Chester E. Finn, Jr. talk this week (May 6) about why Tennessee and Delaware, which received very low scores in a new evaluation of state proficiency standards, nonetheless were the big winners of round 1 of Race to the Top.

Listen to the Podcast

For more on this topic, see “State Standards Rising in Reading but Not in Math,” by Paul Peterson and Carlos Xabel Lastra-Anadon, from the Summer 2010 issue of Education Next.


Peterson and Finn’s previous podcasts:
Do U.S. Students Spend Enough Time Learning?
(4/21/10)
Florida Governor Vetoes School Reform Bill
(4/15/10)
Will NCLB be reauthorized this year?
(3/23/10)
The New Normal for Federal Education Spending
(3/4/10)
Choice and Residential Segregation
(2/23/10)
Studies Find No Effects
(1/7/10)
Focus of School Reform Shifting to Teachers
(12/17/09)
Are Middle Schools or Middle Schoolers the Problem?
(12/10/09)
Biggest Spender in Politics: The NEA
(12/4/09)
Saving Jobs or Stimulating Reform?
(11/24/09)
Election Postmortem
(11/19/09)
Will Congress Reroute the Preschool Juggernaut?
(11/4/09)
Voters Choose Neighborhood Schools over Socioeconomic Diversity
(10/29/09)
The Nobel Committee Isn’t the Only One Giving Speculative Prizes
(10/22/09)
Will Michelle Rhee Triumph?
(10/14/09)
Will the Federal Role in Education Double?
(10/8/09)
Charter Schools Narrow Achievement Gaps in New York City (10/1/09)
What Congress Is Not Working On
(9/24/09)
Charter Schools, Unions, and Linking Teachers with Student Achievement Data
(9/17/09)




Sponsored Results
Sponsors

The Hoover Institution at Stanford University - Ideas Defining a Free Society

Harvard Kennedy School Program on Educational Policy and Governance

Thomas Fordham Institute - Advancing Educational Excellence and Education Reform

Sponsors